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Local News Archives for 2020-04


Oregon reports two new COVID-19 deaths, 64 new COVID-19 cases

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed two more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 103, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 64 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 2,510. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (8), Coos (5), Deschutes (1), Klamath (1), Linn (4), Malheur (1), Marion (17), Multnomah (11), Umatilla (5), Washington (10).

To see more case and county-level data, Oregon Health updates its website once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 102nd COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive April 7 and died on April 26 at Legacy Emanuel Hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 103rd COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old man in Marion County, who tested positive April 25 and died on April 25 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



BEND, OR -- The Bend Water Department urging the owners of closed businesses and empty vacation homes to flush water pipes. Bend Water Quality Manager Drexell Barnes says city water will stagnate if just sitting in the plumbing of businesses and homes. He says that stagnant water can give rise to bacteria that cause of Legionnaires disease. He says vacation home owners should remove aerators from faucets and let cold and then hot water run  for about 30 minutes.

Barnes says business owners can go to the City of Bend Utility Department webpage for information from the CDC to learn how to flush commercial water systems. Barnes says contact plumbing professionals if you need help flushing pipes in a home or business.



BEND, OR -- Bend Fire and Rescue responded to a brush fire on Northeast Purcell on a vacant lot near Saint Charles Medical Center Wednesday morning. Battalion Chief Trish Connolly says fire crews put a stop to the fire and it only got to about a quarter of an acre. She says the cause was determined to be a cooking fire by a transient that got away. Connolly also urges homeowners to clear their property and create defensible space to reduce the risk of wildfire.



PRINEVILLE, OR -- Starting tomorrow federal agencies, will increase flows in the Crooked River. Biologist Brett Hodgson with Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife says juvenile steelhead are being held in pens in Ochoco Creek. He says when the water is released from Bowman Dam into the Crooked River it should boost the juvenile salmon on their journey to the ocean. Hodgson urges anglers to be careful and stay close to the bank of the Crooked River. He says the flow will jump from 330-to-550-cubic feet per second between Friday and Sunday. All of this is an effort to restore Chinook Salmon and Steelhead in the Upper Deschutes Basin


 



Oregon reports two new COVID-19 deaths, 61 new COVID-19 cases

PORTLAND, Ore.— COVID-19 has claimed two more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 101, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 61 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 2,446. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (1), Hood River (1), Jefferson (4), Linn (1), Marion (18), Multnomah (19), Polk (1), Umatilla (8), Washington (7), Yamhill (1).

To see more case and county-level data, Oregon Health updates its website once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 100th COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 20th and died on April 22nd at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 101st COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old female in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 11th and died on April 20th at Adventist Hospital. She had underlying medical conditions.




BEND, OR -- Shepherd’s House Ministries has distributed 18-thousand meals in the last 7 weeks to the homeless and the community. Development Director Dave Ntari says they are giving food boxes out every Monday, Wednesday and Friday starting at 1p.m. He says the food helps many people who are unemployed and, for whatever reason, unable to get unemployment. Natari says Shepherd’s House is also now offering their Community Shower Truck for the homeless and those in need. The shower truck available Tuesdays and Thursdays from 1-to-3pm

 



PRINEVILL, OR -- The Crook County Court will hold a Special Public Session at 1-this afternoon in the County Annex in Prineville. The purpose of the meeting is to consider implementing county employee furloughs due to the current COVID-19 outbreak.

 



WARM SPRINGS,  OR -- Indian Head Casino has announced they will remain closed until further notice. Belinda Chavez at the casino says they are continuing to monitor the COVID-19 Pandemic and at this time cannot provide a definite date to reopen the facility. She says the casino is working to develop and implement a strategy with stringent safety protocols for when the doors re-open. 



SUNRIVER, OR -- Two people were arrested Monday and charged with burglary by Sunriver Police. Chief Cory Darling says a man did a security check on a home because the owner is in Arizona. He spotted a man inside who answered the door and said he was able to live there, then shut the door and locked it. Darling says the man inside the home and a woman were then seen running out the back door and into the woods. Police located the couple near the Sunriver Commons Area. 28 year old David Manzeko of Sacramento and 30 year old Deanne Clair Young of Hawaii are lodged in the county jail on burglary charges.

 



BEND, OR -- The software and hardware in the computers that control signal lights along Highway 97 at the north end of Bend are being upgraded. ODOT’S Peter Murphy says the work begins tonight about 8 o’clock at the signal at Robal and Highway 97. He says when the computer is being upgraded, the traffic signals will switch to flashing red for all directions of traffic. Next Wednesday ODOT will work at Cooley and Highway 97. When the Bend work is finished ODOT will make similar signal light improvements in Redmond.  



The Mayors of Bend and Redmond will hold a virtual news conference once a week starting Thursday morning. Mayors Sally Russell and George Endicott will discuss the latest news about COVID-19 and the local response. They will talk this week about how public meetings have been moved to the virtual environment. They will also outline the involvement of the local business communities in developing reopening strategies.

 



Oregon reports 7 new COVID-19 death, 31 new COVID-19 cases

PORTLAND, Ore.— COVID-19 has claimed seven more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 92 to 99, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 31 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 2,385. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (1), Coos (1), Harney (1), Klamath (1), Linn (2), Marion (9), Morrow (1), Multnomah (13), Umatilla (1), Wasco (1), Yamhill (1).

Note: A case originally reported as a Washington County case was later determined to be a Multnomah County case. The case count in Multnomah county includes the case to reflect this change. However, the case that moved from Washington County to Multnomah County is not reflected in the total of new cases statewide for today.

To see more case and county-level data, Oregon Health updates its website once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 93rd COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old female in Clackamas County, who tested positive on April 17 and died on April 27 in her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 94th COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old man in Marion County, who tested positive on March 30 and died on April 26 at Salem hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 95th COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old man in Marion County, who tested positive on April 20 and died on April 25 at Salem hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 96th COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old female in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 17 and died on April 26 at Legacy Mt. Hood Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 97th COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old female in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 17 and died on April 23 at Adventist Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 98th COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 24 and died on April 26 at Legacy Mt. Hood Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 99th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old man in Yamhill County, who tested positive on April 25 and died on April 26 at Providence Newberg Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

 

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



BEND, OR -- The state of Oregon has reached a 22-million dollar agreement to sell the 382-acre Stevens Road Tract in northeast Bend. The group, Lands Bend Corporation will move forward towards building a complete community with a mix of housing and businesses. Sale proceeds go to the Common School Fund for Oregon’s K-12 schools.  Central Oregon Daily reports the City of Bend annexed the land in 2016 bringing it into the Urban Growth Boundary.  For the full story go here...https://centraloregondaily.com/stevens-road-tract-in-ne-bend-to-sell-for-22-million/

 



BEND, OR -- There’s been a lot of demand for federal money due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Mid-Oregon Credit Union’s Vice President Kyle Frick says the Paycheck Protection average loan amount is $251,615. The average number of employees per borrower is 21. Mid-Oregon has an additional 90 applicants waiting on more money from the federal government.



CENTRAL OREGON --  During the month of May, the Deschutes and Ochocos National Forests and Crooked River National Grassland is offering free firewood cutting. Cutters can take up to 4 cords of firewood for personal use only without obtaining a permit. The forest service plans to return to its regular process of issuing tags after this timeline but may extend it due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The Prineville BLM is not included in this initiative so for more info, contact the Prineville BLM office.



Micheal Franti show cancelled
 

Michael Franti's July 17 concert at the Les Schwab Amphitheater has been cancelled.

Tickets will be fully refunded wherever you made your purchase. Fans that purchased tickets online through Etix will have their money refunded automatically in the coming weeks. Folks that bought their tickets in-person with cash at the Ticket Mill in the Old Mill District should return there for a refund. The Ticket Mill is currently open Monday, Wednesday and Friday, from 3-5 p.m.

Thank you for your understanding and please call our office at 541-312-8510 if you have any questions.



SISTERS, OR -- The final phase of the Highway 20 tree removal process starts today. ODOT’s Peter Murphy says they used an herbicide along the highway that got into trees. He says last year ODOT had to cut down 21-hundred trees, using some for wood products and leaving some for wildlife habitat. Murphy says starting today ODOT will be remove stumps along both sides of Highway 20 on the west side of Sisters to eliminate traffic hazards. The work could take six weeks and  everyone asked to drive carefully through the area.

 



BEND, OR -- Deschutes County Commissioners have started putting together a plan outlining what it will take to open businesses and services. But before anything can open the county will have to show they have supplies and medical capacity to handle a surge in virus cases. The county will also have to conduct about 600 COVID-19 tests per week, which is double what is happening now. The county may also have to hire up to 27 people whose job it will be to trace the spread of the disease. As of now there are only six people doing tracing work in Deschutes county. Commissioners will hold another meeting Wednesday to hear from retail, restaurant, child care and personal care industries about what it will take to safely reopen.

 



BEND, OR -- Deschutes County Health is urging people to be aware of the risk of suicide during a Pandemic. Prevention Coordinator Whitney Schumacher says some of the warning signs include…social isolation…despair caused by loss of income or a job…high levels of anxiety, panic and depression…increased use of alcohol or drugs and access to lethal means to end one’s life. Schumacher says Deschutes county has a 24/7 Crisis Line, and a Senior Loneliness Line for people over 55 and a Youth Line for people 21 or younger.

 

 



BEND, OR -- The Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act, known as CARES has awarded $3,800,000 to the Central Oregon intergovernmental Council (COIC) for transit operations. Executive Director Tammy Baney says she expects to learn soon specifically how the money can be used..but says they need the money as they haven’t charged bus fares for weeks. In addition the transit agency had to hire a new employee to help clean all vehicles. Baney also says some of the money can be used for preventive maintenance as well as security services and security equipment.



PORTLAND, Ore.— COVID-19 has claimed four more lives in Oregon, raising the state death toll to 91, the Oregon Health Authority reported as of 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 58 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 2,311. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (3), Coos (4), Deschutes (2), Jefferson (1), Josephine (1) Linn (3), Marion (4), Multnomah (29), Polk (1), Umatilla (1), Washington (7), Yamhill (1).

To see more case and county-level data, Oregon Health updates its website once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 88th COVID-19 death is a 51-year-old man in Wasco County, who tested positive on April 19 and died on April 24 at Mid-Columbia Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 89th COVID-19 death is a 70-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 12 and died on April 18 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 90th COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 18 and died on April 25 at Adventist Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 91st COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old woman in Marion County, who tested positive on April 9 and died on April 22 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying medical conditions.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



Oregon reports 51 new COVID-19 cases; 3 new deaths; updated model indicates Stay Home, Save Lives is flattening the curve

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 86, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 51 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 2,177. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (5), Lane (2), Marion (20), Multnomah (14), Umatilla (2), Washington (8).

During routine data reconciliation, a case originally reported as a Douglas County case was later determined not to be a case. It was subtracted from Thursday's state total, and the total number of cases in Douglas County went down by one to reflect this change.

To provide more case and county-level data, Oregon Health updates its website once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 84th COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 14 and died April 20 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 85th COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 12 and died April 19 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 86th COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old man in Linn County, who tested positive on March 15 and died April 22 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Updated modeling report shows flattened curve

OHA also released a modeling report update today that indicates the efforts of Oregonians to stay home and practice physical distancing has helped prevent as many as 70,000 COVID-19 cases in Oregon.

“The epidemic would have continued to grow exponentially, doubling every week,” the report states. “By April 16th, the number of cumulative infections would have been about 80,000, including 2,000 hospitalizations. Hence, the interventions are estimated to have averted over 70,000 infections, including over 1,500 hospitalizations (450 instead of 2,000), by April 16th.”

“Our modeling continues to show that our collective efforts are working,” said Dean Sidelinger, MD, state epidemiologist. “And despite the very real hardships these sacrifices have cost Oregonians, we have to keep it up even as we move toward easing restrictions. We need to build on our success in limiting the spread of COVID-19.”

OHA has worked with the Institute for Disease Modeling on the weekly reports, which use Oregon outbreak data with IDM research and modeling techniques to present policy makers with projections for the trajectory of the disease. The models are updated weekly.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



A couple of Bend businesses were the target of arson early yesterday morning. Crews were called out to Enterprise Rent-A-Car around 4:30 yesterday morning. A second fire was reported at the nearby El Sancho restaurant about the same time. The suspect unsuccessfully tried to ignite numerous propane canisters at the restaurant.  When that didn’t work, he threw a concrete umbrella stand through one of the windows. At the car rental business, he attempted to light a propane tank, which did not ignite, but the deck caught fire. Over a thousand dollars in damages was done to each building. Surveillance video led police to 37-year-old Demetrios Tsitsilianos who was taken into custody near Hill and Hawthorne. 



Oregon reports 68 new COVID-19 cases; 5 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore -- COVID-19 has claimed five more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 83, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 68 new cases of COVID-19 bringing the state total to 2,127. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (8), Coos (1), Deschutes (4), Douglas (1), Hood River (1), Klamath (3), Linn (4), Malheur (1), Marion (9), Multnomah (16), Umatilla (1), Wasco (1), Washington (18).

To see more case and county-level data, Oregon Health updates its website once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 79th COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old female in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 3 and died on April 22 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 80th COVID-19 death is a 78-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 30 and died on April 19 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 81st COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 20 and died on April 22 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 82nd COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 9 and died on April 21 at Adventist Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 83rd COVID-19 death is a 70-year-old man in Clackamas County, who tested positive on April 1 and died on April 21 at Kaiser Sunnyside Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



The Oregon Health Authority reported 2 new cases in Deschutes county making for 66 confirmed cases locally. 1 new case confirmed in Jefferson County makes 2 there. And still the one case in Crook County. The OHA says statewide there were 57 new cases for a total of 2-thousand-59.


 



bend, or -- Deschutes County Commissioners discussed opening the economy at their meeting yesterday. Commissioner Tony DeBone says the Phase One effort would be based on federal and state guidelines. It could lead to reopening of things like hair salons, day spas, yoga studios, art galleries, theaters and skating rinks. Phase 2 could be larger gatherings for groups, restaurants and possibly events. Deschutes County Commissioners will hold a special meeting at 230, Friday afternoon to discuss a possible Phase One reopening.



BEND, OR -- The COVID-19 Pandemic is creating problems related to everyday living. People are working from home…kids attending school on-line…and of course workers unemployed because businesses have closed. Sheriff Shane Nelson says they noticed a decrease in call volumes for a while. However he says between March and early April there was a spike in domestic calls…90 this year compared to 70 last year in the same time frame . Nelson says it is something we’ll keep an eye on. Nelson also says so far none of his deputies or staff have become infected with COVID-19.

 



BEND, OR -- The Executive Director of Summit Medical Group, Justin Sivill, had good news for commissioners about COVID-19….positive tests are slowing down. He says they’ve conducted 350 tests with 12 positive and 18 pending. Sivill says they have had only one positive test for the virus in the last 2 weeks. He warned however that a large percentage of the Central Oregon population on Medicare face multiple chronic health issues…including heart and lung disease. Sivill says treatments were stopped after being classified non-essential. He said getting treatment for these patients is becoming a critical need.



About 3:45 yesterday aftenoon a dump truck towing a backhoe with its boom extended up in the air dragged down power lines onto Highway 97 just south of the Deschutes Market-Tumalo Road interchange. The driver of the Central Oregon Irrigation District truck just kept on going north on 97.  One of the live wires struck the hood of car driven by 64-year-old Joseph Zimmer of Bend, causing him serious but non-life-threatening injuries. Sheriff's deputies caught up with the dump truck and driver about a half hour later near the Redmond Airport. Authorities say 55-year-old Stuart Keyte of Redmond was aware he hit the power lines with the excavator but left the scene anyway.  He was issued a felony criminal citation for leaving the scene.



Around 4:30 yesterday afternoon Bend fire crews responded to a fire on the back deck of a home on Moonlight Drive in northeast Bend. The 4 adults and 1 child, along with their pets, had all evacuated the home safely. Crews were able to quickly stop the fire. The back deck and back bedroom were damaged. Cause of the blaze was improperly disposed of smoking materials into dry fuels on the ground. Bend Fire reminds everyone that even the hot ash that drops off the end of a cigarette can cause a fire.  



Oregon reports 57 new COVID-19 cases; no new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore.— Oregon Health Authority reported 57 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 2,059. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (10), Coos (1), Deschutes (2), Jefferson (1), Linn (1), Marion (7), Multnomah (24), Washington (10) and Yamhill (1).

To see more case and county-level data, Oregon Health updates its website once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Note: Test reports were received yesterday but due to a technical issue, negative test results were not able to be processed overnight and are being processed today. The number of negatives is classified as “pending” in today’s data table.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



BEND, OR -- The Bend La Pine Schools are urging parents to register their children for kindergarten as soon as possible. Elementary Program Director Gary Timms says this will help with planning and staffing. He says they expect about 12-hundred new children in Kindergarten this coming school year. Children must be 5-years old on or before September 1st to enter Kindergarten.



BEND, OR -- The City of Bend is trying to give people in neighborhoods the opportunity to walk or bike closer to their home. Bend transportation Director David Abbas says they are using the Neighborhood Greenways Network and he says most are low volume traffic streets. Abbas says they’ll will have barricades, cones and signs out and urge drivers to slow down. He says streets won’t be closed completely and will be open to homes and businesses just no through traffic. Go to the City of Bend webpage to find all the Stay Healthy Streets.



BEND, OR -- The March unemployment numbers sound like a bad joke. Deschutes county with 3-point-4-per cent…Crook county with 4-point-9-per cent and Jefferson county at 4-point-4-per cent. Economist Damon Runberg says the numbers are so low because the March report reflects what was happening as of March 12th. He says the following week, the governor issued the Stay-At-Home order and unemployment has jumped since then.  Runberg says the April report will show how much the unemployment picture has really changed.



Oregon reports 3 new COVID-19 deaths, 46 new COVID-19 cases

PORTLAND, Ore.— COVID-19 has claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 78, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 46 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 2,002. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (2), Coos (1), Klamath (2), Linn (1), Marion (10), Multnomah (22), Umatilla (2), Wasco (1), and Washington (7).

After receiving updated residency information, Benton and Yamhill Counties both transferred cases to other Oregon counties yesterday. This led to an overall increase of 46 new cases statewide, and an increase of 48 new cases for the counties.

To see more case and county-level data, Oregon Health updates its website once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 76th COVID-19 death is a 47-year-old man in Washington County, who tested positive on March 16 and died on April 17 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 77th COVID-19 death is a 61-year-old woman in Washington County, who tested positive on March 24 and died on April 18 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 78th COVID-19 death is a 65-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive and died on April 20 at Adventist Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.



BEND, OR -- Republican State Representative Cheri Helt of Bend is working to funnel part of the federal COVID-19 relief funds for increasing internet access for Oregon students. Helt told the state board of education that statewide broadband access should be a standard when it comes to education. Helt says public education’s share of the one-time money for COVID-19 relief should also go to purchasing tablets or laptops for students.

 



BEND, OR -- The Valor Foundation of Bend is teaming up with COVO, the Central Oregon Veterans Outreach, to help men and women who served our country now being impacted by COVID-19. Dave Worden at the Foundation says they focus on helping veterans with the basics…food, shelter and clothing. He says the Valor Foundation has launched Backpacks for Vets which will be distributed at the Central Oregon Veterans Outreach office this Friday 11am to 3pm. Log onto THE-VALOR-FOUNDATION-DOT ORG for more information if you want to help.

 

 



BEND, OR -- A U-S Supreme Court ruling Monday, tossed out non-unanimous jury verdicts in Oregon as unconstitutional. Deschutes County D-A John Hummel is pleased. He says only Oregon and Louisiana allowed the non-unanimous verdicts but that’s over.  Hummel says Oregon voters approved a ballot measure years ago allowing less than unanimous verdicts. He says the measure was intended and designed to disenfranchise immigrants. Hummel says there are four Deschutes County cases on appeal and he expects the courts will order re-trials in those cases.

 



BEND, OR -- The COVID-19 Pandemic has attracted scammers trying to take your money. Danielle Kane at the Better Business Bureau says scammers rely on fear and confusion. She also says scammers are well aware of what is being reported on the news and know what gets people’s attention. Kane says they use email, text messages and Facebook. She says scammers also will often identify themselves as being from well-known organizations or agencies like  the IRS, Social Security or the CDC. Kane says none of those agencies will ever contact you by phone, email or social media. 



The Oregon Health Authority reported 1 new COVID-19 death bringing the state total to 75. No new cases were reported in Central Oregon. The OHA also reports 47 new cases bringing the state total to 1-thousand-956. The latest death from COVID-19 was a 45 year old man with underlying medical conditions. 



BEND, OR -- In a weekly update email, St. Charles President and CEO Joe Sluka said his father-in-law died from COVID-19 this past Friday. “Some of you have already watched loved ones struggle to recover, while others have experienced devastating losses,” Sluka said. “For me, that wasn’t the case until last Friday when COVID hit home.”

Sluka said he heard his father-in-law was sick and would be moved to comfort care early Friday morning. He passed away by late afternoon, Sluka said. “This is a man that loved and was loved,” Sluka said. “I lost someone I considered a friend, father and one of my biggest supporters.” Sluka said he understood Central Oregonian’s frustration with being out of work and staying home. He referenced a protest against Gov. Brown’s executive order held in Redmond last week. But Sluka urged Central Oregonians to continue abiding by social distancing guidelines. “While everyone wants to get back to work, relaxing our social distancing measures requires thoughtful planning and consideration to ensure who don’t throw ourselves right back into the eye of the storm,” Sluka said.Sluka said St. Charles is developing guidelines for virus testing, working to ensure they have enough personal protective equipment and supporting contact tracing efforts. St. Charles in Bend has begun processing COVID-19 tests locally for patients with results available in 40 minutes, Sluka said.

While he outlined a roadmap to recovery and thanked the public for social distancing, Sluka emphasized the fight against COVID-19 isn’t over yet. “You have bought us precious time and we thank you,” Sluka said. “But that doesn’t mean the storm is over.” For the full story click here: https://centraloregondaily.com/st-charles-ceo-loses-father-in-law-to-covid-urges-social-distancing/



Oregon reports 1 new COVID-19 death, 47 new COVID-19 cases

PORTLAND, Ore.— COVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 75, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 47 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 1,956. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (10), Douglas (1), Klamath (1), Lincoln (1), Linn (2), Marion (13), Multnomah (6), Polk (1), Umatilla (1), Washington (9), and Yamhill (1).

A case previously reported in Jackson County was transferred out of state during routine data reconciliation, reducing the cumulative statewide cases by one.

To see more case and county-level data, Oregon Health updates its website once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 75th COVID-19 death is a 45-year-old man in Marion County, who tested positive on April 14 and died on April 18 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



BDEND, OR -- BEND, OR -- The COVID-19 Pandemic will have a negative impact on the Bend budget. City Manager Eric King he expects some big hits to revenues the city relies on. He says with people driving much less, the city’s share of gas taxes will drop. King says another hit is the money the city gets from the transient room tax. He says with the state under a stay-at-home order, there’s going to be a big drop in those revenues. King says he has asked all departments to come up with 5-to-10-per cent budget cuts to be considered by the city council in June.   



BEND, OR -- COCC is offering what are called late-start, online classes during spring term. The Vice President of Student Instruction, Betsy Julian says seven online courses are offered. She says however, online classes are offered in a condensed format over a much shorter time frame with tight deadlines. Julian says the online classes provide flexibility because students can take them any time of day or night depending on their schedule. The registration deadline is May 6th and classes start May 11th.  Go to the  COCC home page to apply and register.



BEND, OR -- Starting today, Cascades East Transit (CET) will require all bus risders to wear a face covering or a mask, effective today, Monday April 20. The agency also announced service changes until further notice: Community Connector services will operate on Saturday schedules during weekdays. One round trip per weekday will be implemented on Route 28 (Redmond to Sisters). All Saturday Bend fixed route and Community Connector services are suspended as are weekend Dial-A-Ride services. Bend fixed route weekday service will continue to operate on a Saturday Schedule, which went into effect April 6.  .



The Oregon Health Authority reported 4 new COVID-19 deaths over the weekend bringing the state toal to 74. The report says the state recorded 125 new COVID-19 cases for a statewide total of 1,910. Deschutes county has had 3 new cases since last Friday. No deaths from COVID-19 have been reported in Central Oregon. The people who died from the virus ranged in age from 62-to-84, all with underlying medical conditions.



BEND,L OR -- State Representative Cheri Helt of Bend wants Governor Kate Brown to allow essential medical procedures in Central Oregon. In a letter to Brown, Helt says, I am confident that leaders in the health and medical fields, in consultation with state and local public health officials, can work together to determine the guidelines and specific procedures to govern this process. Helt’s letter also says she is not referring to cosmetic surgery, rather surgery that is essential for people to live their daily lives. She says delaying necessary procedures will have long term physical and mental health impacts for real people.

 



Oregon reports 6 new COVID-19 deaths, 49 new COVID-19 cases

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed six more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 70, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 49 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 1,785. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (3), Deschutes (2), Jackson (1), Lane (1), Linn (3), Marion (8), Multnomah (19), Polk (1), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (1), Washington (7), and Yamhill (2) . To see more case and county-level data, go to the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 65th COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old woman in Clackamas County, who tested positive on April 15 and died April 16 at Adventist Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 66th COVID-19 death is a 95-year-old man in Linn County, who tested positive on April 2 and died April 14 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 67th COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old man in Linn County, who tested positive on April 6 and died April 15 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 68th COVID-19 death is a 65-year-old woman in Marion County, who tested positive on March 26 and died April 6 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 69th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old woman in Marion County, who tested positive on April 12 and died April 16 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 70th COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 7 and died April 11 at Adventist Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Epidemic modeling report indicates physical distancing measures are working

Today OHA released an update to its epidemic modeling report, which helps Oregon’s leaders understand the progression and the projections for the COVID-19 outbreak.

"Today’s modeling update tells us that statewide mitigation efforts are keeping the caseload and hospitalizations well below the numbers we would have seen absent our efforts as a state," said state epidemiologist Dean Sidelinger, MD. "We are encouraged by the continued success of our mitigation efforts, which are allowing us to begin planning for suppression strategies for when the statewide measure can begin to be lifted."

View the report.

Summary data tables are downloadable now

The summary tables of OHA’s “epi curve” and “persons tested tables” are now live on our website.

To view the summary tables, use a desktop computer to open the OHA Data Dashboard. Click the link for "Summary Table" in the top right corner (the summary tables and data download are best viewed from a desktop, not mobile).

To download the data, click the download button at the bottom of each table (square icon with arrow pointing down). Choose "Crosstab" as the file format to export the data.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



BEND, OR -- With so many struggling due to the weakened economy, the City of Bend is offering to help businesses with utility bills. City Manager Eric King says they have dedicated 50-thousand dollars from the water and sewer agencies to pay for the help. He says businesses can get a 500-dollar utility credit based on simple criteria. King says it’s small program but it will help some who are struggling. 



BEND, OR -- A Bend-based volunteer organization has launched an app to help local businesses impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. SOS Bend-dot-com will allow people to purchase store credit from local businesses currently closed or minimally operating and redeem it later. Matt Abrams with the group says people are desperate to do something but they feel overwhelmed when it comes to where to go or what to do.



REDMOND, OR -- Mayor George Endicott says there has been a 90-per cent drop in air passenger traffic at the Redmond airport. He says there will be a 60-per cent decrease in of flights with Alaska cancelling all flights to Portland in the month of May. Endicott says the almost 9 million dollars from the federal government can be used for payroll, utilities, operating expenses and capital expenditures. Endicott says the money should cover the airport budget for about a year



BEND, OR -- The Bend City Council voted not to ban short term rentals of less than 30 days. If approved the ban would have carried fines of 750-dollars a day for rental operators and guests. Council members voiced concern that the hotel industry is already hurting, there would be more job losses and there’s no sign that tourists are crowding into the area. Other council members voiced concerns that allowing short-term visitors could spread the virus. The vote was 4-to-3.



Oregon reports 6 new COVID-19 deaths, 73 new COVID-19 cases

PORTLAND, Ore.— COVID-19 has claimed six more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 64, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 73 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 1,736. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (8), Deschutes (4), Douglas (2), Klamath (3), Lane (1), Linn (1), Malheur (1), Marion (15), Multnomah (18), Umatilla (5), Washington (12), and Yamhill (1). To see more case and county-level data, Oregon Health updates its website once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 59th COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 24 and died on April 13 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 60th COVID-19 death is a 56-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 28 and died on April 14 at Legacy Mount Hood Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 61st COVID-19 death is a 78-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 30 and died on April 14 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 62nd COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 13 and died on April 15 at Kaiser Sunnyside Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 63rd COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old woman in Benton County, who tested positive on April 2 and died on April 14 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 64th COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old man in Marion County, who tested positive on April 14 and died on April 11 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



PRINEVILLE, OR  -- Crook County Firefighters were all over the place Tuesday, fighting three different fires in less than 2-hours. Division Chief Russ Deboodt says crews responded to a hay fire just before noon. It was caused by welding which lit grass on fire then spread to 60 tons of hay, all of which was destroyed. Shortly after noon crews responded to a field burn that got away when there was a sudden wind shift, damaging trees and utility lines. Then about 1-45 a travel trailer fire on Southeast Pecos Lane in Prineville. Deboodt says the trailer was a complete loss but crews were able to limit damage to a nearby stick home to an exterior wall.



BEND, OR -- The popular South Canyon section of the Deschutes River Trail has new, temporary rules. Julie Brown at Parks and Rec says the trail will be one way with no bikes allowed and dogs only on leashes. She says the trail will be a one-way…counter-clockwise…direction. There are lots of signs along the South Canyon section of the Deschutes River Trail to help you out.

 



MADRAS, OR  -- Jefferson county continues to report one case of COVID-19. The person is out of state, under care and not hospitalized. Jefferson County Health Information Officer Tami Kaypaa says the person is also under a 14-day quarantine. She says regardless of where a virus test is conducted, the county of residence remains the primary reporting classification. 

 



REDMOND, OR -- The Redmond City Council met virtually this week and Mayor George Endicott says they discussed the negative impacts on the city budget due to COVID-19. Endicott says he and the council expect a big drop to the transient room tax due to a much less tourism. He says however, the Redmond City Council has made no move to ban short term rental stays. Endicott says on the positive side, manufacturing and construction are two strong sectors of the Redmond economy.

 



April 15, 2020

Oregon reports 3 new COVID-19 deaths, 33 new COVID-19 cases

PORTLAND, Ore.— COVID-19 has claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 58, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 33 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 1,663. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (7), Columbia (3), Douglas (1), Lane (2), Linn (1), Marin (5), Multnomah (10), Umatilla (1), and Washington (2).  

Three cases previously reported in Washington County were reclassified during routine data reconciliation. Two of the cases were removed and one was transferred to Washington state after residency was confirmed. These modifications reduce the cumulative statewide total by three. To see more case and county-level data, Oregon Health updates its website once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 56th COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old man in Marion County, who tested positive on April 3 and died on April 10 at Santiam Hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 57th COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 30 and died on April 12 at Adventist Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 58th COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 9 and died on April 12 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The U-S Department of Transportation's Federal Aviation Administration has awarded $8,900,000 to the Redmond Airport to help respond to the COVID-19 Pandemic. The money will support continuing operations and replace lost revenue from a sharp drop in passenger traffic and other airport business. The money can be used for airport capital expenditures, operating expenses, including payroll, utilities and airport debt payments.  The federal agency is awarding more than $140,000,000 to 55 airports in Oregon.



BGEND, OR -- The non-profit Saving Grace organization helps victims to heal and recover from domestic violence and sexual assault. Ryan Stillwell at Saving Grace says staying at home isn’t safe for everyone.  He said the number of calls to their hotline hasn’t changed much, but callers are now requesting more references for help or how to get an immediate restraining order. Saving Grace is working to set up a chat line so victims can be more discreet when they reach out for help.



SALEM, OR -- The Oregon Health Authority reports 2 more COVID-19 deaths bringing the state total to 55. The report shows 1 new case in Deschutes county and 1 case in Jefferson county. The Jefferson county case is the first COVID-19 case reported. The OHA also reports 50 new cases of COVID-19 bringing the state count to 1-thousand-633 cases. The two people who died were a 71-year-old man and an 88-year-old woman, both with underlying medical conditions.

 



BEND, OR -- Saint Charles will start offering drive-up COVID-19 testing starting tomorrow. The testing will be outside the Family Care Clinic on Neff Road weekdays from 9am to 3pm. Mike Richards, the Operations Vice President at Saint Charles, says the test uses a nasal swab. He says people must meet Oregon Health Authority criteria and have a doctor’s order to get the test. Those who want to be tested must make an appointment with St Charles. The results come back within 2-to-4 business days.

 



Oregon reports 2 new COVID-19 deaths, 50 new COVID-19 cases

 

PORTLAND, Ore.— COVID-19 has claimed two more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 55, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 50 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 1,633. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (3), Deschutes (1), Douglas (3), Jefferson (1), Klamath (1), Lane (1), Marion (9), Multnomah (22), Tillamook (1), Washington (5), and Yamhill (2) .

A case previously reported in Columbia County was reclassified to negative based on revised test results, reducing the cumulative statewide total by 1 case. To see more case and county-level data, Oregon Health Authority updates its website once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 54th COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 1 and died on April 12 at Legacy Mount Hood Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 55th COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old woman in Benton County, who tested positive on April 11 and died on April 13 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

 

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



Brandi Carlile show postponed

We recently received word that Brandi Carlile is postponing all of her May concerts, including her May 23 show at the Les Schwab Amphitheater.  Thank you for all your patience and understanding as we deal with these unprecedented times together. We'll let you know the new reschedule date as soon as it's released.

If you have questions, please call 541-312-8510.



The Oregon Health Authority reports one new COVID-19 death bringing the state total to 53 as of Monday morning. The OHA reported 57 new cases bringing the state total to 1-thousand-584. The report shows no new cases in Deschutes, Jefferson or Crook counties. The OHA reports the latest death from the virus was a 66-year-old woman with underlying medical conditions.

 



Starting today at 9 a.m. and continuing through Friday, crews will be striping U.S. 20 from the Santiam Junction to just east of Santiam Pass. Flaggers will be present.  Travelers should expect delays each day between 9-to-5. The project completes a paving project during last summer and fall.  The wet weather in September and October prevented crews from doing the striping.  



BEND, OR -- A nurse who killed her grandmother in 2015, has pleaded guilty to criminally negligent homicide and sentenced to 5 years in prison. Deschutes County D-A John Hummel says 49-year-old Angela Judd confessed to a social worker that she killed 92-year-old Nada Bodholdt. He says the social worker told police, leading to Judd’s arrest and conviction. However, the Oregon Court of Appeals overturned the conviction because the confession was privileged and couldn’t be used. Hummel worked out a resolution with defense attorneys. Photo Credit Central Oregon Daily News

 



BEND, OR -- A Bend area transient was arrested Saturday afternoon following a violent confrontation with police. Bend Police Lieutenant Juli McConkey says 26-year-old Jonathan Emanuel Solis was reported drunk and aggressively threatening people near Brentwood Avenue and Brosterhous Road. She says police tried to divert Solis’s attention and instead he charged at them. A K-9 was deployed. McConkey says Solis choked, punched and kicked the dog, then tried to hit it with a large rock. She says an officer knocked the rock out of Solis’s hand and the dog was not hit. She says police used Tasers multiple times and eventually got Solis in handcuffs and then a WRAP restraint. Solis was cited for multiple crimes.

 



CENTRAL OREGON -- On April 1st, the snowpack in the Upper Deschutes and Crooked River Basin showed snowpack at 94-per cent. Today it is down to 88-per cent. Hydrologist Scott Oviatt at the Natural Resources Conservation Service says it’s pretty much the same story, statewide. He says snowpack begin to melt out in April but is accelerating faster year due to warm weather. Oviatt says the long-range forecast for the Pacific Northwest for the next 1-to-3-months is for above average temperatures and below level precipitation.



California, Oregon & Washington Announce Western States Pact

West Coast States Agree Region Will Move Toward Reopening Based On Health Outcomes 
 

(Portland, OR) — Today, California Governor Gavin Newsom, Oregon Governor Kate Brown and Washington Governor Jay Inslee announced an agreement on a shared vision for reopening their economies and controlling COVID-19 into the future.

Joint statement from the Governors:

COVID-19 has preyed upon our interconnectedness. In the coming weeks, the West Coast will flip the script on COVID-19 – with our states acting in close coordination and collaboration to ensure the virus can never spread wildly in our communities.

We are announcing that California, Oregon and Washington have agreed to work together on a shared approach for reopening our economies – one that identifies clear indicators for communities to restart public life and business.

While each state is building a state-specific plan, our states have agreed to the following principles as we build out a West Coast framework:

Our residents’ health comes first. As home to one in six Americans and gateway to the rest of the world, the West Coast has an outsized stake in controlling and ultimately defeating COVID-19.

Health outcomes and science – not politics – will guide these decisions. Modifications to our states’ stay at home orders must be made based off our understanding of the total health impacts of COVID-19, including: the direct impact of the disease on our communities; the health impact of measures introduced to control the spread in communities—particularly felt by those already experiencing social disadvantage prior to COVID-19; and our health care systems’ ability to ensure care for those who may become sick with COVID-19 and other conditions. This effort will be guided by data. We need to see a decline in the rate of spread of the virus before large-scale reopening, and we will be working in coordination to identify the best metrics to guide this.

Our states will only be effective by working together. Each state will work with it’s local leaders and communities within its borders to understand what’s happening on the ground and adhere to our agreed upon approach.

Through quick and decisive action, each of our states has made significant progress in flattening the curve and slowing the spread of COVID-19 among the broader public. Now, our public health leaders will focus on four goals that will be critical for controlling the virus in the future.

  • Protecting vulnerable populations at risk for severe disease if infected. This includes a concerted effort to prevent and fight outbreaks in nursing homes and other long-term care facilities.
  • Ensuring an ability to care for those who may become sick with COVID-19 and other conditions. This will require adequate hospital surge capacity and supplies of personal protective equipment.
  • Mitigating the non-direct COVID-19 health impacts, particularly on disadvantaged communities.
  • Protecting the general public by ensuring any successful lifting of interventions includes the development of a system for testing, tracking and isolating. The states will work together to share best practices.


COVID-19 doesn’t follow state or national boundaries. It will take every level of government, working together, and a full picture of what’s happening on the ground.

In the coming days the governors, their staff and health officials will continue conversations about this regional pact to recovery.
 

###



Oregon reports 1 new COVID-19 death, 57 new COVID-19 cases

PORTLAND, Ore.— COVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 53, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 57 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 1,584. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (7), Columbia (2), Douglas (2), Jackson (1), Josephine (1), Lane (4), Marion (4), Multnomah (24), and Washington (12). To see more case and county-level data, Oregon Health updates its website once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 53rd COVID-19 death is a 66-year-old Washington County resident, who tested positive on March 30 and died on April 12 at Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



BEND, OR -- Deschutes County Commissioners and Sheriff Shane Nelson have allocated one-half million dollars to COVID-19 response needs. Commissioner Patti Adair says there remains a need for critical supplies, Personal Protection Equipment, or PPE’s for health care workers. She says the money will also be used for ventilators and other supplies. Adair says the money will be used for hotel housing for First Responders, some of whom are now in a special location. She says they are also working on housing for the homeless who are particularly vulnerable to the virus.

 



BEND, OR -- Deschutes County D-A John Hummel has ruled a shooting incident March 9th  involving Bend Police Officers was justified under Oregon law. Hummel says the decision by Danielle Bowers to drive drunk and then flee from police constituted crimes. Hummel says that Bowers was shot because when her car was stopped after a pursuit, she put her minivan in reverse and floored the accelerator. The minivan headed directly at an officer and his K-9 when police fired. The officers escaped injury and Bowers, who was shot, is recovering.

 



BEND, OR -- A three year battle between COCC and the federal VA has moved to a federal court. The V-A claims COCC has been given overpayments of $3,000,000 for veterans enrolled in the college’s Aviation Program. The Vice President for Student Affairs, Alicia Moore, says they have reached out to the  Congressional delegation…have traveled to Washington D.C. for face-to-face meetings with V-A leadership…all to no avail. Moore says the V-A has applied legal standards that were written for trade schools, not colleges and has repeatedly ignored evidence presented by COCC. Moore says they have now asked a federal court in Eugene to order the VA to give the college the same appeal rights as allowed and required under VA regulations.

    



Starting on Tuesday, April 14 at 9 a.m. and continuing through Friday, crews will be striping U.S. 20 from the Santiam Junction to just east of Santiam Pass (mileposts 74.5 to 88).  Flaggers will be used to control two-way traffic.  Travelers should expect delays each day between 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The project completes a paving project during last summer and fall.  The wet weather in September and October prevented crews from doing the striping.  



Oregon COVID-19 infections projected to remain level into May, stay within current hospital capacity, if Oregonians continue social distancing

PORTLAND, Ore. — New projections from health researchers estimate that Oregon’s “aggressive” social distancing measures have prevented as many as 18,000 cases of COVID-19 and 500 hospitalizations, however these restrictions must be maintained into May to prevent new cases from rising above current daily levels of active coronavirus cases. By following Governor Brown’s stay at home executive orders, Oregonians are preventing a surge in new infections that could overwhelm hospital beds if left unchecked. Researchers noted that Oregon’s “health care systems would likely have become overburdened by late April in the absence of these sustained interventions to keep the number of infections under control.”

The latest model is based on the latest actual COVID-19 infection, hospitalization and death data. Researchers lengthened their assumptions on hospital length-of-stay based on the accumulation of additional data from Oregon cases. The results are used to aid in planning the state’s response. According to the latest report, which extends modeling until May 18:

  • Cumulative COVID-19 infections: Under current social distancing conditions, the total cumulative infections with COVID-19 in Oregon on May 18 would be fewer than 20,000. However, if the state were to return to moderate social distancing (i.e., reopen non-essential businesses while keeping schools closed), the number of new infections would quickly climb to more than 60,000 by May 18.
  • Active infections: Active infections would stay at currently projected levels of more than 2,000 cases per day through mid-May and then begin to slowly subside, if the state maintains current social distancing measures. However, if the state were to return to moderate social distancing, the number of active infections each day would spike to more than 17,000 per day.
  • Hospital beds needed: The projected adult acute care and intensive care bed usage will remain below the available capacity in Oregon through the model period (through May 18).

The models were prepared by the Institute for Disease Modeling in Washington. Based on the data, researchers predict there are approximately 7,000 cases of active infection in Oregon at this time. 

Dr. Dean Sidelinger, state health officer at OHA, said: “Staying at home and maintaining physical distancing is difficult and has had serious economic impacts that have affected many people, but the data continue to show that Oregonians are saving lives by staying home. The latest projections are more conservative than previous versions of the model because they account for variables such as longer hospital stays or the likelihood that COVID-19 has been in Oregon longer than we initially estimated. However, even these estimates, show we can slow new COVID-19 infections and ultimately begin to drive them down if we can sustain today’s social distancing measures.”

According to the model released today, the state should expect to see fewer than 500 hospitalizations per day due to COVID-19 if social distancing remains in place and hospitals in Oregon would use fewer than 200 intensive care unit beds per day. However, Oregon hospitals would need nearly 2,000 beds per day by May 18, if current stay home orders were relaxed. 

State officials continue to focus on strengthening the health care system’s ability to meet the coming surge. State health officials are working with hospitals and other health care partners to mobilize the health care workforce and keep workers safe, expand bed capacity and secure more ventilators in the event COVID-19 cases begin to rapidly escalate.




Oregon reports 4 new COVID-19 deaths, 51 new COVID-19 cases

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed four more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 48, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 51 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 1,371. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (7), Clatsop (1), Deschutes (1), Hood River (1), Josephine (1), Klamath (4), Lane (1), Marion (11), Multnomah (15), and Washington (9).

A previously reported Yamhill County case was reclassified based on a revised laboratory result, reducing the cumulative statewide case count by 1. To provide more case and county-level data, Oregon Health Authority updates its website once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 45th COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 24 and died April 4 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 46th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 30 and died April 5 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 47th COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 2 and died April 9 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 48th COVID-19 death is an 83-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 3 and died April 7 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

 Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



Bend Garbage/Republic Services and Cascade Disposal/Waste Management are temporarily suspending the collection of curbside glass within the city of Bend until at least May 15. Glass is collected by hand and may pose health and safety risks to collection service employees who need to observe physical distancing and other COVID-19 safety protocols.

For the time being, individuals should do one of the following for glass disposal:

·         Keep recyclable glass until recycling resumes.

·         Take recyclable glass to one of these drop off sites:

o    Cascade Disposal, 1300 SE Wilson Ave., Bend, Mon. – Fri., 7 a.m. – 4 p.m.

o    Deschutes Recycling at Knott Landfill, 61050 SE 27th St., Bend, Mon. – Sat., 7 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

·         Place glass in the trash cart.

NOTE: Please do not place glass in recycling carts. This causes issues with sorting and processing recycling. Customers will be notified when curbside glass collection resumes.



From Bend La Pine Schools

Grab and Go Meals Expanding to 10 School Sites

Free meals now include breakfast, lunch and supper items

 

Bend-La Pine Schools is adding two new school sites – for a total of 10 school locations - to its free Grab and Go meal locations beginning Monday, April 13. The two new school locations are Three Rivers School in Sunriver and Westside Village Magnet at Kingston School in Bend. Additionally, each meal will now include items for supper, as well as breakfast and lunch. The free meals are available to children age 0 to 18, Monday to Friday, from 10:30 a.m. to noon.

 

“We are excited to add two new sites and begin to offer items for supper,” said Garra Schluter, Nutrition Supervisor for Bend-La Pine Schools. “We are proud of the work our staff members are doing to help serve our community at this time.”

 

Schluter says Nutrition Services is currently serving approximately 1,600 breakfasts and 1,600 lunches every day.

 

Pick up sites are available:

 

Amity Creek Magnet at Thompson School

437 NW Wall St, Bend

 

Bend Senior High School

230 NE Sixth St., Bend

 

Elk Meadow Elementary School

60880 Brookswood Blvd., Bend

 

Ensworth Elementary School

2150 NE Dagget Lane, Bend

 

La Pine High School

51633 Coach Road, La Pine

 

Mountain View High School

2755 NE 27th St., Bend

 

Pilot Butte Middle School

1501 NE Neff Road, Bend

 

R.E. Jewell Elementary School

20550 Murphy Rd, Bend

 

Three Rivers School

56900 Enterprise Drive, Sunriver

 

Westside Village Magnet at Kingston School

1101 NW 12th St, Bend

  

Visitors are asked to enter through designated doors, pick up a meal from the cafeteria and then take the meal to go. Gathering inside the school is discouraged.

 

Bend-La Pine Schools custodial staff will be cleaning before and after each meal. Adults can purchase a meal for $4.  

 

Bend- La Pine Schools is an equal opportunity provider.

 

#END#

 



REDMOND, OR -- Redmond Firefighters responded to a house fire in the 17-hundred block of Southwest Juniper Avenue yesterday morning. Occupants were outside of the home when crews arrived. The fire was in the front of the home with power lines down in the front yard. Firefighters got the fire out and then determined no family members were injured. Damage to the home estimated at 75-to-100-thousand dollars with the cause determined to be an unattended burning candle in a bedroom.



REDMOND. OR -- The decision to have Oregon students take online classes through the end of the school year will present challenges. Redmond Superintendent Mike Mcintosh says he has 11-hundred students who have no access to online education at home, a problem he hopes to resolve by Monday. Mcintosh says they have a plan to help all students get through the on-line school year with special attention to seniors. He says this week Redmond schools will finish the second trimester that would have ended at the start of spring break. McIntosh says the third trimester will start Monday and the school year will end, as planned, on June 11th.



BEND, OR -- Officials from Saint Charles held a virtual Town Hall yesterday and answered a range of questions, several focusing on testing for COVID-19. They said anyone who has worsening symptoms regardless of age or other medical conditions is a candidate for testing. The health system hopes to start on-site testing today. Saint Charles officials also said they are doing whatever is needed to prepare for a surge in COVID-19 cases. They also repeatedly urged people to stay home to slow the spread of the virus.

 



La Pine -- A La Pine woman is jailed on drug and weapons charges after she tried to speed away from a sheriff’s deputy in her truck and got stuck in snow. Police say 44-year-old Emma A. Pickett was seen by a deputy running a stop sign at Highway 97 at State Recreation Road and almost causing a collision. The deputy gave chase, but Pickett sped away on a Forest Road for six miles before her truck got stuck. She was cited for methamphetamine and weapon charges as well as Attempting to Elude.



Oregon reports 6 new COVID-19 deaths, 83 new COVID-19 cases

PORTLAND, Ore.— COVID-19 has claimed 6 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 44, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 83 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 1,321. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (6), Columbia (1), Curry (1), Deschutes (5), Jackson (4), Klamath (1), Lane (2), Linn (3), Marion (17), Morrow (2), Multnomah (16), Polk (1), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (3), Washington (16), and Yamhill (4).

A previously reported Wallowa County case was identified as a Washington State resident, reducing the Wallowa County case total and the statewide case count by 1.  To see more case and county-level data, Oregon Health updates its website once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 39th COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old man in Linn County, who tested positive on March 22 and died on April 3 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 40th COVID-19 death is a 97-year-old man in Linn County, who tested positive on March 15 and died on April 4 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 41st COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 28 and died on April 6 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 42nd COVID-19 death is a 41-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 5 and died on April 8 at Oregon Health and Sciences University. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 43rd COVID-19 death is a 66-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 31 and died on April 5 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 44th COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old man in Benton County, who tested positive on March 26 and died on April 8 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center in Corvallis. He had underlying medical conditions.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



BEND, OR -- A road rage incident last week landed a Bend man in jail. Police say a driver, 20-year-old Riley Christian Noble was on Purcell Boulevard and a vehicle in front of him was driving about 15 miles an hour in a school zone. Noble honked his horn at the other driver.  43-year-old Jeremiah Walker Nisbet allegedly pulled over and let Noble pass before up alongside him and pointing what appeared to be a handgun at him. Noble got a description of the car and driver and notified police. The police served a search warrant this week and found an Airsoft gun in Nisbet’s car and other pistols and firearms in his home. Nisbet is charged with Menacing and Unlawful Use of a Weapon.   



64-year-old LeAnna Hunnel of Bend is accused of purposely driving her car into another woman's tent at a homeless camp site in the area of China Hat Road.  The vehicle stopped on top of the tent, pinning 41-year-old Michelle Marlow inside.  Marlow was able to use a knife to cut her way out of the tent and escape with minor injuries. Hunnel was arrested and taken to Deschutes County jail.

 



From COEIN

Jefferson County Public Health reports today the first positive case of COVID-19 confirmed for a Jefferson County resident. The resident is currently living out of the state and receiving care through their out-of-state provider. This case highlights the way our public health system works. Regardless of where a test is conducted, the county of residence remains the primary reporting classification. Jefferson County Public Health and local partners will continue to work with this initial case as well as respond to this declared emergency.

As of today, Jefferson County has 1 positive COVID-19 case.

·         A Jefferson County resident has tested positive outside the state of Oregon. The person has not been in Central Oregon during their infectious period.

·         There is no hospitalization.

·         This individual is fully cooperating with public health.

As this novel coronavirus continues to spread, Jefferson County Public Health and local healthcare providers stress that the safety of staff and community members remains our highest priority. Therefore, local partners will continue to provide quality care and ensure timely and accurate information remains available to the public. As our situation is constantly changing, Jefferson County Public Health will continue to share the most current information and guidelines available.

Jefferson County Public Health respects and values the privacy of community members and the confidentiality regarding medical information. Therefore, no identifiable information will be released about confirmed cases in Jefferson County.

The Jefferson County Public Health Communicable Disease team has already started working diligently to identify and notify all known contacts of the positive case through case investigation.

·         Case investigation includes identifying all known contacts of the positive cases so proper notification and risk assessment can occur. This allows local public health to then apply monitoring requirements recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Oregon Health Authority.

·         Status on investigation of known contacts is ongoing.  Currently all persons under monitoring are cooperative and following the guidance.

·         Any persons under monitoring will be monitored by Jefferson County Public Health for a minimum of 14 days.

Jefferson County Public Health has been part of the Central Oregon response around COVID-19 since the first of March and will continue to work closely with neighboring counties along with our local city and county organizations.

Central Oregon Public Health Agencies and the Oregon Health Authority continue to recommend people take everyday precautions to prevent the spread of many respiratory illnesses, including COVID-19 and influenza - The CDC is recommending the following interventions to slow the spread of COVID-19, and other respiratory infections (including flu and pertussis) by taking everyday preventive actions, including:

·         If you feel sick, call ahead to your healthcare provider to discuss whether or not you need to be seen. 

·         Cover your coughs and sneezes with a tissue and then throw the tissue in the trash.

·         Wash your hands often with soap and water for 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.

·         Avoid close contact with people who are sick.

·         Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.

·         Clean and disinfect surfaces that are often touched.

·         Take care of your health overall. Staying current on your vaccinations, including flu vaccine, eating well and exercising all help your body stay resilient.

·         Consult CDC’s travel website for any travel advisories and steps to protect yourself if you plan to travel outside of the US.

·         Stay home if you are sick and talk with your employer now about a plan if you do become ill and cannot show up for work.

·         It is advised that anyone with compromised immune systems, chronic medical conditions and the elderly not attend large events and practice physical distancing to protect yourselves.

·         Public Health Officials recommend that all individuals wear a face cloth covering when physical distancing is not possible.

ABOUT COEIN
COEIN’s website, www.coemergencyinfo.blogspot.com provides a collective resource for up-to-date information. Access to accurate, timely information both locally and nationally is encouraged. Our County Public Health experts point to the Oregon Health Authority and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as good sources of information. Daily situation updates are available via email at http://bit.ly/COVID19UPDATES COVID-19 phone line: Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. 541-699-5109

Central Oregon Emergency Information Network (COEIN), includes Deschutes County Health Services, Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, St. Charles Health System, Crook County Health Department, Crook County Sheriff’s Office, Jefferson County Health Department, Jefferson County Sheriff’s Department, tri-county public schools, City of Bend, Bend Police, Bend Fire & Rescue, and others. COEIN’s purpose is to collect, coordinate and distribute timely and accurate information.

Accommodation Information for People with Disabilities  
To obtain this information in an alternate format such as Braille, large print, electronic formats, etc. please contact the COEIN JIC at 541.316.0087 or centraloregoninfo@gmail.com.


 



Oregon reports 5 new COVID-19 deaths, 58 new COVID-19 cases

PORTLAND, Ore.— COVID-19 has claimed five more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 38, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 58 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 1,239. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (6), Columbia (1), Deschutes (1 total now 45), Hood River (1), Lane (1), Linn (1), Marion (3), Morrow (1), Multnomah (28), Wallowa (2), and Washington (13). To see more case and county-level data, Oregon Health updates its website once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 34th COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 28 and died on April 6 at OHSU Hospital. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 35th COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 27 and died April 1 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.  

Oregon’s 36th COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 6 and died April 7 at Kaiser Sunnyside Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions. 

Oregon’s 37th COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old man in Yamhill County, who tested positive on March 25 and died April 7 at Providence Newberg Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions. 

Oregon’s 38th COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old man in Yamhill County, who tested positive on March 25 and died April 7 at Providence Newberg Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions. 


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



SALEM, OREGON -- Oregon Governor Kate Brown says  schools in Oregon will remain closed through this academic year. The governor told reporters the decision was made to protect the health of students, teachers and staff. She noted it would be impossible to adhere to social distancing measures in classrooms and schools. The governor made the announcement during a news conference with Oregon Department of Education Director Colt Gill. She said seniors on track to graduate would receive passing grades. Listen for updates and more details on the KBND Morning News, 6-to-9am, Thursday morning. 



From Central Oregon Emergency Information Network

 

OUTDOOR RECREATION OPTIONS CLARIFIED; PUBLIC COOPERATION NEEDED NOW

News Release from Central Oregon Emergency Information Network

As temperatures are forecast to climb this week, Central Oregonians should be aware of outdoor recreation opportunities and follow orders regarding closures and restrictions in place to reduce personal exposure to COVID-19 and to protect first responders.

Mental health experts recommend fresh air and time in nature, but this must be balanced with the physical distancing mandated by the state-wide executive order to stay home. With different governments managing different lands, here’s a comprehensive look at all the options and current status.

BENEFITS OF BEING OUTDOORS
Limited outdoor activities are suggested by public health officials to help counter mental health issues and other incidents that may result in higher frequency due to stay home orders, including divorce, suicide, domestic violence, unwanted pregnancies, etc. Allowing places for people to get out may help to curtail some of the negatives of social isolation.

“Local, state or federal, we’re all in this together. The BLM is doing what we can as part of the whole of America's response to the coronavirus,” said Jose Linares, acting State Director BLM Oregon and Washington. “Although we have vast open spaces we continue to want people to use, we can’t stress enough that everyone listen to local officials and practice safe physical distancing.”

Central Oregonians are encouraged to take this opportunity to explore the nature close to home, especially when it can be done without adding to parking lot congestion at popular destinations.

“Our local parks, trails and open spaces have always served as places where people can find respite and seek peace and restoration,” said Don Horton, executive director, Bend Park and Recreation District. “During this time of uncertainty, these places are needed now more than ever.”

PHYSICAL DISTANCING IN PARKS AND ON TRAILS

Use wide trails where possible to stay six feet from others while passing.

User-created trails damage habitat and create erosion.

Visit less popular trails at less popular times. If you see many people or a full parking area, go elsewhere or at another time.

Use trails and paths at nearby parks rather than driving across town or beyond.

Wash hands before and after any visit to a park or trail.

Follow local and national guidance to wear cloth face coverings in public.

Offer a wide berth when passing and if approaching from behind, say a friendly “hello, passing on your left.”

Keep dogs on a leash.

Go solo or only with members of your household. No groups.

If this is not possible or if you are sick, stay at home – do not use a park or trail.

OTHER OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES

There are other activities to consider outdoors:

Gardening and yardwork

Set up space to relax, do yoga, or do art outdoors

Read a book on a patio, balcony or in backyard

Clean your vehicle or bike

Go for a bike ride

I spy nature games with your kids in the backyard

WHY ARE CLOSURES AND RESTRICTIONS NECESSARY?
Closures and use modifications protect the health and safety of visitors, employees and volunteers. The closures also reduce the non-medical demand for personal protective gear, such as masks and gloves, required for facility cleaning, and they protect infrastructure during a time when staff and volunteers are unable to respond to on-the-ground needs.

“These closures aren’t about enforcement. We urge people to abide by these closures and physical distancing guidelines to reduce impacts to our communities’ medical providers and first responders,” said Holly Jewkes, Forest Supervisor, Deschutes National Forest.

Built park amenities including playgrounds, skateparks and sport courts increase contact between people and equipment including rackets and balls. These activities are not allowed under the governor’s executive order.

ENFORCEMENT OF CLOSURES AND RESTRICTIONS

Signs and other markings are being used to inform park and trail users of the closures and restrictions throughout Central Oregon. Unfortunately, these physical markings and barriers are being vandalized and removed in many areas. The executive order states that violations will be considered an immediate danger to public health. Blocking, or impeding, vehicle traffic or damaging natural resources may result in citation on federal, state, county, city or special district property.

The park districts, Deschutes National Forest and others are working closely with law enforcement agencies regarding unauthorized use of closed property and/or reports of removing physical barriers to gain access to closed property.

“I ask for everyone’s cooperation and sharing responsibility so we can weather this public health pandemic together,” added Horton.

“We know the outdoors are calling, and the decisions you make affect everyone. If there was ever a time to recognize our interdependence, this is it,” added Jewkes.

#COVID19 #StayHomeSaveLives #CentralOregonCares #DoTheRightThingNW



BEND, OR  -- Deschutes County Clerk Nancy Blankenship reminds voters that Tuesday, April 28, is the party choice deadline for the upcoming primary election on May 19. Voters who wish to vote in the Democratic or Republican closed primary elections need to be registered as a member of that party by the deadline. Voters who are not affiliated with a major party will receive a non-partisan ballot that will only contain non-partisan state and local offices and measures. Deschutes County Elections asks voters to check that their address, party affiliation, and name are up-to-date in their voter registration record.

 



BEND, OR --  Bend Police Chief Jim Porter is putting off retirement to help the city manage the COVID-19 Pandemic. He had planned to make this Friday his final day following a 42 year career in law enforcement. The Bulletin reports Porter and City Manager Eric King agreed he will stay on the job until at least June 15th. Porter says he will work with King to deal with operational budget cuts due to an expectation that city tax revenues are going to face a big drop due to the stay at home order and the closure of many businesses. 

 



BEND, OR --  Last week, United Way in Central Oregon launched a new COVID-19 Response Fund to agencies delivering emergency assistance to Central Oregonians hardest hit by COVID-19. The local United Way has announced it has added 30-thousamnd dollars to the fund. In addition, United Way is now accepting applications for grant funding. Grants are available to nonprofits in Crook, Deschutes, and Jefferson counties and Warm Springs, that provide emergency assistance and essential services to those impacted by COVID-19.  The application for the grants for non-profits can be found at the United Way website.

 



CENTRAL OREGON, OR -- The Deschutes National Forest is being negatively impacted by the COVID-19 Pandemic. Jean Nelson-Dean at the forest says their prescribed burn programs scheduled for the spring will most likely not happen due to air quality concerns. She also says the Deschutes and Ochocco National Forests and the Crooked River Grasslands have closed all improved campgrounds, restrooms and trailheads. Nelson-Dean says people can still take a hike in the forest but asks everyone not to block roads and observe social distancing. 

 



Oregon reports 4 new COVID-19 deaths, 49 new COVID-19 cases

PORTLAND, Ore.— COVID-19 has claimed 4 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 33, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 49 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 1,181. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (7), Clatsop (1), Deschutes (4), Klamath (1), Lane (1), Linn (1), Marion (6), Multnomah (15), Polk (2), Washington (11). To see more case and county-level data, Oregon Health Authority updates its website once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 30th COVID-19 death is an 83-year-old female in Marion County, who tested positive on March 28 and died on April 5 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 31st COVID-19 death is a 98-year-old female in Marion County, who tested positive on April 1 and died April 5 in her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.  

Oregon’s 32nd COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old female in Marion County, who tested positive on March 30 and died April 2 in her residence. She had underlying medical conditions. 

Oregon’s 33rd COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old female in Washington County, who tested positive on March 27 and died April 6 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

New weekly report on COVID-19 cases in Oregon

Starting today, OHA will begin posting a weekly report that represents a snapshot of COVID-19 risk factors, clinical and demographic characteristics, and includes data on cases with pending investigations. You can review the report here.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



SISTERS, OR -- From ODOT Region 4 

As ODOT plows the Old McKenzie Highway there is a serious hazard to bicyclists who choose to ignore the warning signs at the gate outside of Sisters.  The signs are posted for the safety of everyone and ignoring them presents risks to themselves and the operators of the heavy equipment transiting the highway.  We are encountering 9 feet of snow below Windy Point and there’s a reported 105 inches at Obsidian Trailhead.  This will take some time for ODOT to remove and bicyclists (and others) are prohibited while our plowing work is underway.

Peter W. Murphy

Public Information Officer

ODOT Region 4



The Oregon health Authority reports two more COVID-19 deaths have been reported raising the state total to 29. The OHA also reported 64 new cases as of Monday morning. The report says 1 new case of COVID-19 has been reported in Deschutes County for a total of 40.

 



CENTRAL OREGON --  The Crook, Deschutes and Jefferson County Health Departments are urging people to wear cloth masks when they go outside for visits to grocery stores, the pharmacy, a restaurant or while in workplaces.  Health officials say frequent hand washing and social distancing remain the most important ways to help  prevent the spread of COVID-19 virus. Health officials say wearing a mask can help prevent spread of the virus to other people who may be carrying the virus but are showing no signs of illness.  

 



BEND, OR -- The Commercial Real Estate market has had some jolts from the COVID-19 Pandemic. Pat Kesgard with Compass Commercial says some businesses have been forced to close because they have been classified non-essential. He says it is important for the business to communicate with landlords or their bank to get something worked out. He says in some cases the landlord or bank might give a 2 month deferral of payments that have to be paid back over the next 12 months. In other cases there’s the possibility of an extension of the lease until the stay at home order is lifted.  



BEND, OR -- Deschutes County Commissioners have decided to fine property owners who rent out their homes as short term rentals or their guests could face fines of 1-thousand dollars per day. The new fines, approved by a 2-to-1 vote, takes effect this Friday April 10th. Commissioner Tony DeBone voted no because he wanted the fine to be on the books immediately. Last week commissioners passed an order prohibiting anyone from staying fewer than 30 days in vacation, short term, timeshares, inns and B & B’s outside of LaPine, Bend, Redmond and Sisters. The ban was designed to help slow the spread of COVID-19. Commissioners say education will be a priority but fines will be levied for those who don’t comply with a warning. 

 

 



BEND, OR -- The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office has started an online reporting system to allow citizens to file non-emergency reports over the Internet. The non-emergency reports would include minor traffic wrecks, criminal mischief, vehicle break-in or, theft. Citizens can also submit crime tips and request extra patrol at a specific location. However, the service should NOT be used for any crime where a known suspect has been identified or for in-progress crimes or emergencies.  To file a report go to the sheriff’s web page and follow the link to File Online Report.

 



The Oregon Department of Revenue is warning taxpayers of calls and email phishing attempts related to the novel coronavirus, or COVID-19, pandemic and federal government relief payments. These scams can lead to tax-related fraud and identity theft.

Taxpayers should watch not only for emails but text messages, websites, and social media attempts that request money or personal information.

“Oregon taxpayers should take extra precaution to guard their personal information from these unscrupulous scam attempts,” said Oregon Department of Revenue Director Nia Ray. “Most people who qualify to receive a stimulus check do not need to sign up, apply, or verify any personal information, online or else where.”

The Oregon Department of Revenue and the IRS remind taxpayers that scammers may:

  • Emphasize the words “stimulus check” or “stimulus payment.” The official term is economic impact payment.
  • Ask the taxpayer to sign over their economic impact payment check to them.
  • Ask by phone, email, text, or social media for verification of personal and/or banking information saying that the information is needed to receive or speed up their economic impact payment.
  • Suggest they can get a tax refund or economic impact payment faster by working on the taxpayer’s behalf. This scam could be conducted by social media or even in person.
  • Mail the taxpayer a bogus check, perhaps in an odd amount, then tell the taxpayer to call a number or verify information online in order to cash it.

Taxpayers should look out for phishing emails asking them to verify their personal information in order to receive an economic stimulus check from the government. While talk of economic stimulus checks has been in the news cycle, government agencies are not sending unsolicited emails seeking taxpayers’ private information in order to send them money. Phishing emails may also claim to be related to:

  • Charitable contributions.
  • General financial relief.
  • Airline carrier refunds.
  • Fake cures and vaccines.
  • Fake testing kits.

The IRS doesn't initiate contact with taxpayers by email, text messages, or social media channels to request personal or financial information. People should be alert to scammers posing as the IRS to steal personal information. The IRS initiates most contacts through regular mail delivered by the United States Postal Service.

Reporting coronavirus-related or other phishing attempts
Those who receive unsolicited emails, text messages, or social media attempts to gather information that appear to be from either the IRS or an organization closely linked to the IRS, such as the Electronic Federal Tax Payment System (EFTPS), should forward it to phishing@irs.gov.

Taxpayers are encouraged not to engage potential scammers online or on the phone. Learn more about reporting suspected scams by going to the Report Phishing and Online Scams page on IRS.gov.

Official IRS information about the COVID-19 pandemic and economic impact payments can be found on the Coronavirus Tax Relief page on IRS.gov. The page is updated quickly when new information is available.

For more information on taxpayers protecting themselves, or what to do if they’re a victim of identity theft, taxpayers can visit:



On the heels of an announcement by The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) urging Americans to begin using cloth face coverings in public to help slow the spread of COVID-19, Crook, Deschutes and Jefferson county health departments are advocating that all residents take heed and begin wearing a mask to cover their mouths and nose in public, starting today, April 6.

The CDC now recommends wearing a cloth mask in “public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain,” such as grocery stores, workplaces, restaurants and interactions with others outside of your home, etc.

Central Oregon’s public health experts emphasize that social distancing, frequent hand washing, and avoiding others when sick remain critical public health efforts that can prevent the transmission of the COVID-19 virus.

“Don’t assume that wearing a mask takes the place of any of those healthy behaviors,” said Muriel DeLaVergne-Brown, Crook County Public Health Administrator. “But covering up can help prevent the spread of COVID-19 by the many local residents who may be carrying the virus, but are not showing signs of illness.”

Jefferson County Public Health Administrator Michael Baker adds that the CDC recommends wearing cloth face coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain (e.g., grocery stores and pharmacies), especially in areas of significant community-based transmission.

“The cloth face coverings recommended are not surgical masks or N-95 respirators. Those are critical supplies that must continue to be reserved for healthcare workers and other medical first responders, as recommended by current CDC guidance,” said Baker. “Please reserve the N-95 for those on the frontline of this outbreak who rely on them for protection and instead make cloth face masks for use in public for your family members.”

Baker noted that the principle behind the cloth masks is the same regardless of design. Having a physical barrier to prevent droplets from landing on others, discouraging the wearers from touching their faces, and possibly reducing large droplets from landing on mucous membranes are the goals for wearing masks in public.

Dr. George Conway, Deschutes County Health Services Director noted that at the beginning of this pandemic, the strong message to the public from the CDC and WHO was not to wear N95 and other medical masks, to preserve that inventory for health care workers during potentially hazardous encounters unless you were already infected and need to interact with others.

“The assumption at the time was that people without symptoms were healthy and would not spread the disease,” said Conway. “As details of this virus have emerged, we now know that some people are contagious before they have symptoms and some never feel sick at all and they spread the disease before they would ever consider masking up.”

Conway noted that wearing a homemade mask is beneficial in helping reduce the spread of the virus among those who appear healthy, yet are carrying the virus and those with symptoms.

“When we both cover our nose and mouth, I protect you and you protect me,” he adds.

Health officials caution that wearers be mindful when adjusting facial coverings and avoid reaching under them if they itch to touch your nose or mouth because the virus can spread by unwashed hands. Also, masks do not work well if they are soiled or damaged.

Central Oregon Health Officials urge that there are a number of reasons to wear a cloth mask:

·         Droplets do transmit the disease, but they can be generated from talking as well as coughing. Just standing next to someone talking could spread the disease if neither party is masked. 

·         DIY masks can possibly provide protection to the public without impacting the supply of manufactured masks currently prioritized for healthcare workers. 

·         There is data that suggests that in countries where masking is encouraged for all citizens, the rate of disease transmission may be reduced by their actions. 

·         Wearing a mask while sick is stigmatizing for those who wear them.  Universal use wouldn’t identify who was sick and who wasn’t. 

CDC ON HOMEMADE MASKS
CDC advises the use of simple cloth face coverings to slow the spread of the virus and help people who may have the virus and do not know it from transmitting it to others. Cloth face coverings fashioned from household items or made at home from common materials at low cost can be used as an additional, voluntary public health measure.

Cloth face coverings should not be placed on young children under age 2, anyone who has trouble breathing, or is unconscious, incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance.

The cloth face coverings recommended are not surgical masks or N-95 respirators. Those are critical supplies that must continue to be reserved for healthcare workers and other medical first responders, as recommended by current CDC guidance.

Should cloth face coverings be washed or otherwise cleaned regularly? How regularly?
Yes. They should be routinely washed depending on the frequency of use.

How does one safely sterilize/clean a cloth face covering?
A washing machine should suffice in properly washing a face covering. According to the California Department of Public Health, face cloths can be laundered with detergent and hot water and dried on a hot cycle.

How does one safely remove a used cloth face covering?
Individuals should be careful not to touch their eyes, nose, and mouth when removing their face covering and wash hands immediately after removing.

DESIGN TIPS FOR HOMEMADE MASKS FROM LOCAL HEALTH OFFICIALS:

·         Build a mask that tightly encloses the area around the nose and mouth, from the bridge of the nose down to the chin, and extending onto the cheek beyond the corners of the mouth, so no gaps occur when talking or moving.

·         Use mask material that is tightly woven but breathable. Possibly double-layer the fabric.

·         Masks can be made from washable material such as fabric from a clean t-shirt or bandana. 

·         Choose a fabric that can handle high temperatures and bleach without shrinking or otherwise deforming.

·         The mask should be tolerant of expected amounts of moisture from breathing.

·         There is no standard design for a homemade facemask therefore, consider innovation using the design principle above. Below are example designs for consideration:

Videos:

·         Face Mask Kit, Providence St. Joseph Health

·         How to sew a simple Fabric Face Mask, YouTube

·         United States Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams even created a video demonstrating how to make your own mask

Written instructions:

·         CDC Guidance for DIY Face Masks

·         Instructions from St. Charles Health System

·         How to make a facemask, Allina Health

·         Face Mask Directions, Joan Glass

·         Facemask: A picture tutorial

ABOUT COEIN
COEIN’s website, www.coemergencyinfo.blogspot.com provides a collective resource for up-to-date information. Access to accurate, timely information both locally and nationally is encouraged. Our County Public Health experts point to the Oregon Health Authority and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as good sources of information. Daily situation updates are available via email at http://bit.ly/COVID19UPDATES COVID-19 phone line: Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. 541-699-5109

Central Oregon Emergency Information Network (COEIN), includes Deschutes County Health Services, Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, St. Charles Health System, Crook County Health Department, Crook County Sheriff’s Office, Jefferson County Health Department, Jefferson County Sheriff’s Department, tri-county public schools, City of Bend, Bend Police, Bend Fire & Rescue, and others. COEIN’s purpose is to collect, coordinate and distribute timely and accurate information.



Oregon reports 2 new COVID-19 deaths, 64 new COVID-19 cases

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed two more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 29, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 64 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (6), Columbia (2), Curry (2), Deschutes (1), Douglas (1), Jackson (6), Josephine (3), Klamath (3), Lane (2), Linn (1), Marion (11), Multnomah (10), Polk (2), Umatilla (1), Washington (12). Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 28th COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old male in Washington County, who tested positive on March 30 and died April 4, at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 29th COVID-19 death is a 70-year-old female in Marion county, who tested positive on April 1 and died April 2, in her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Update: The COVID-19 case data OHA publishes once a day on its website and shares once a day with the media are provisional and subject to change. A case reported yesterday as a Yamhill County case was later determined to be a Washington County case. The total number of new cases in Washington County is 12 to reflect this change. However, the case that moved from Yamhill County to Washington County is not reflected in the total of new cases statewide for today.

New dashboard to help visualize COVID-19 data in Oregon


OHA today unveiled a new dashboard to help visualize COVID-19 data and trends in Oregon. The two graphs show Oregon’s epidemiological curve and the number of Oregonians who have been tested for COVID-19.

These data are provisional. Our team of epidemiologists continues to review and verify data, so our reported numbers will change. As we get more information, we update the data from previous days.

You can find a link to our data dashboard on OHA’s main COVID-19 web page at http://healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Watch this video for an overview of the dashboard.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



BEND, OR -- The Mount Bachelor Sports Education Foundation has cancelled the 44th Annual SELCO Pole Peddle Paddle due to the COVID-19 Pandemic. Racers who pre-registered have the choice of donating their entry to the sports foundation or, rolling over their entry fee to the 2021 event. The Pole Peddle Paddle competition is the largest annual fundraiser for the Mt Bachelor Sports Education Foundation. The foundation has set up a website, www.pppbend.com for people who want to donate to the foundation.

 



PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 26 to 27, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 69 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (6), Columbia (3), Klamath (1), Lane (3), Linn (2), Marion (10), Multnomah (24), Polk (2), Sherman (1), Umatilla (2), Washington (12), Yamhill (3). Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 27th COVID-19 death is a 62-year-old female in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 2, 2020, and died on April 2, 2020, in her residence. It is unknown at this time if she had underlying medical conditions.



Central Oregonians play a key role in the campaign to help slow the spread of the COVID-19 virus and can help keep our friends and neighbors safe, and keep our health system strong.

Today, dozens of local leaders from Crook, Deschutes and Jefferson counties are teaming up with television and radio stations to raise awareness about how local residents can protect themselves and those around them through a series of COVID-19 awareness messages being released throughout April.

“Many people are worried about the way COVID-19 is affecting our communities”, said Michael Ryan, Crook County Sheriff’s Office Emergency Manager. “The disruptions to daily life are challenging for all of us, yet important to slowing the spread of COVID-19 – that is why we are lending our voices to this important campaign.”

Watch and listen for mayors, commissioners, leaders from ODOT, schools, police, fire and more as they lend their voices to this critical effort on social and traditional media channels. Thousands of messages will be shared this month alone throughout Crook, Deschutes and Jefferson counties, thanks to media partners at Bend Radio Group, Combined Communications, Horizon Broadcasting, NPG of Oregon and Zolo Media Group.

“We know we are asking a lot of Oregonians in order to protect our communities,” Ryan added. “We continue to need your help to reduce the spread of this vicious virus and keep Central Oregonians, Oregonians and our entire country healthy.”

According to the World Health Organization today (10AM Central European time), the U.S. has surpassed France and now ranks third in the world for COVID-19 death counts  (4,793 deaths), behind Italy (13,917) and Spain (10,003). The U.S. continues to be home to more known cases of COVID-19 than any other country on earth.

The Central Oregon Emergency Information Network reminds residents that together, we can bend the curve. Stay home, save lives.

Watch PSA:  Emily Kirk, City of Bend and Central Oregon Emergency Information Network

ABOUT COEIN
COEIN’s website, www.coemergencyinfo.blogspot.com provides a collective resource for up-to-date information. Access to accurate, timely information both locally and nationally is encouraged. Our County Public Health experts point to the Oregon Health Authority and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as good sources of information. Daily situation updates are available via email at http://bit.ly/COVID19UPDATES COVID-19 phone line: Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. 541-699-5109

Central Oregon Emergency Information Network (COEIN), includes Deschutes County Health Services, Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, St. Charles Health System, Crook County Health Department, Crook County Sheriff’s Office, Jefferson County Health Department, Jefferson County Sheriff’s Department, tri-county public schools, City of Bend, Bend Police, Bend Fire & Rescue, and others. COEIN’s purpose is to collect, coordinate and distribute timely and accurate information.



PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed four more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 22 to 26, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 100 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today, bringing the statewide total to 999. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (12), Columbia (2), Deschutes (3), Douglas (2), Jackson (6), Josephine (1), Klamath (1), Lane (3), Linn (3), Marion (10), Multnomah (34), Polk (2), and Washington (19). Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 23rd COVID-19 death is a 65-year-old man in Marion County, who tested positive on March 26, 2020, and died on April 2, 2020, at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 24th COVID-19 death is a 59-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 24, 2020, and died on April 3, 2020, at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 25th COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 30, 2020, and died on April 2, 2020, at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 26th COVID-19 death is a 64-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 23, 2020, and died on April 1, 2020, at Legacy Mount Hood Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.



PRINEVILLE, OR -- KBND reported this week that Crook county had recorded its first positive case of COVID-19. County Emergency Manager Vicky Ryan says the case is travel related not community spread. She says the person is not very sick and is in self-isolation. Ryan says the health department is reaching out to people and businesses the infected person may have come into contact with. She says they expect more cases and urge people to social distance and wash hands frequently. Ryan says those who get sick need to contact their healthcare provider.

 



REDMOND, OR -- Effective yesterday, all people who have flown into the Redmond Airport  are asked to self-quarantine. Preparedness Coordinator Morgan Emerson says the request to self-quarantine is not because of the travel related COVID-19 case in Crook county.  Emerson says however, more than half of the cases in the area have some history of travel. She says if a traveler has family at home they could get a hotel room but give the hotel advance notice. Another option is to have the family self-quarantine with the traveler. The third option is have the traveler self-quarantine in a room or a part of the house alone.



BEND, OR -- The initial claims for unemployment benefits as of last week have been released, and of course, the news is not good. State Economist Damon Runberg says initial claims for unemployment benefits at the week ending March 28th were 92-thousand-700, which represents a 21-per cent increase from the week ending March 21st. One-third of the claims came from people who lost jobs at hotels, restaurants, bars and other service jobs. Runberg says the second highest number of claims came from healthcare and social services workers.

 



BEND, OR -- Deschutes county officials have clarified their prohibition on short term rental stays in the rural, unincorporated areas applies to time shares. The county says to  clarify – the order does NOT prevent an owner from using their own timeshare, but it would restrict them from renting their timeshare to another party. The Deschutes County Commissioners expect to discuss this issue in greater detail during their meeting on Monday.

 



Oregon reports 1 new COVID-19 death, 73 new COVID-19 cases

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 22, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 73 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (5), Clatsop (1), Crook (1), Deschutes (4), Klamath (5), Malheur (1), Marion (14), Morrow (1), Multnomah (15), Polk (2), Washington (17), Yamhill (5). Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 22nd COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old man in Polk County, who tested positive on March 19 and died April 2 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.

OHA: Non-medical masks can supplement but not replace Stay Home, Save Lives.

With recent news that federal authorities may recommend wearing masks in public, Oregon Health Authority is reminding Oregonians that staying home and avoiding all non-essential contact with others continues to be the most important thing all of us can do to stay healthy and keep others healthy. And during moments where people must go out of the house, they should stay at least 6 feet apart from others at all times.

Before deciding whether to wear a mask, Oregon Health Authority recommends people keep two considerations central:

  • Medical masks should be reserved for health care providers who are on the front lines working with patients most likely to have COVID-19. We have had shortages of those masks – and it's critically important that our health care workers have the equipment they need to do their jobs.
  • Non-medical mask use (e.g., homemade fabric masks) does not replace the need to follow guidance to stay home and limit our contact with others. It does not replace frequent handwashing, avoiding touching the face, and staying away from people who are ill. These are the most important steps to prevent the spread of COVID-19 illness.

“We continue to stress that medical masks are essential for health care workers who are in close contact with someone who has COVID-19," said Paul Cieslak, MD, medical director for communicable diseases, OHA Public Health Division. "We need to preserve supplies of medical masks for our health care workers so they can stay safe as they work to keep all of us healthy. For the general public, homemade fabric masks, especially if well-made and well-fitting, may provide some benefit."

Wearing a fabric mask can help prevent the spread of infection to others when the mask is worn by someone who already is infected with the virus that causes COVID-19, particularly if the person is coughing. The mask may block some infectious droplets from spreading when someone with the infection coughs, sneezes and, to a lesser degree, speaks.

"The data do not tell us how much protection homemade cloth masks provide to the person wearing a homemade mask. For this reason, homemade and fabric masks should not be considered reliable protection; but they may provide some benefit," said Cieslak. “Above all, we continue to stress that the reliable tool we have right now to prevent the spread of COVID-19 is strict social distancing – as outlined in Governor Brown’s ‘Stay Home, Save Lives’ orders.”

Everyone, even people who are young and healthy, must stay home to slow the spread of COVID-19. Read more here about Governor Brown’s “Stay Home, Save Lives” orders. Read more here about OHA’s social distancing guidelines.

Changes in hospital reporting

COVID-19 hospital capacity data on today’s Daily Update, formerly labeled the Situation Status Report, or Sit Stat, is listed as “pending” due to data quality issues. OHA is working with its partner hospitals to improve the COVID-19 data reporting process so we can ensure the accuracy, consistency and timeliness of the underlying data. The state has paused our public reporting so OHA can provide additional technical assistance to hospital staff. OHA will resume public reporting of COVID-19 hospital capacity data as soon as we have achieved full compliance and consistency in data reporting across all sources.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



2020 SELCO POLE PEDAL PADDLE CANCELLED DUE TO COVID-19

Fundraiser established to support Mt. Bachelor Sports Education Foundation, which relies on PPP proceeds to provide sports programs to more than 600 youth

 

(BEND, Ore.) – The Mt. Bachelor Sports Education Foundation today announced that the 44th Annual SELCO Pole Pedal Paddle, scheduled to take place May 16, 2020, has been cancelled due to the current COVID-19 pandemic. Racers who pre-registered will have the option of rolling over their entry fee to the 2021 event, or donating their entry to support MBSEF, the event’s beneficiary.

 

“With so much uncertainty regarding COVID-19, and the current ‘Stay Home, Save Lives’ proclamation, we knew that the responsible and prudent thing to do for the community was to cancel the event,” said PPP Race Director Molly Cogswell-Kelley. “Over half of our participants come from outside of Central Oregon, and traveling to Bend is just not an option right now. Not having the 44th Annual SELCO Pole Pedal Paddle, the longest running multisport event in Central Oregon, is beyond devastating.”

 

The PPP is the largest annual fundraiser for the Mt. Bachelor Sports Education Foundation.  Founded in 1927 as the Skyliners Club, MBSEF is a local nonprofit that serves more than 600 youth athletes in competitive Alpine and Nordic Skiing, Freeride Skiing, Freeride Snowboarding and Cycling.

 

The SELCO Pole Pedal Paddle’s date for 2021 is May 15, 2021. In the meantime, registered participants and the community at large can visit www.pppbend.com for more information or to donate to the newly established “Future of the PPP Fund,” which supports MBSEF and the Pole Pedal Paddle.

 

The SELCO Kid’s Mini PPP, scheduled for May 17, has been postponed and may be rescheduled for a date in September. More information on the SELCO Kid’s Mini PPP will be available once a decision has been made.

 



Oregon reports 2 new COVID-19 deaths, 90 new COVID-19 cases

PORTLAND, Ore.— COVID-19 has claimed 2 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 19 to 21, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 90 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the statewide total to 826. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (5), Deschutes (5), Hood River (1), Jackson (5), Josephine (2), Klamath (3), Lane (3), Lincoln (1), Marion (13), Union (2), Multnomah (26), Washington (22), and Yamhill (1). Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s twentieth COVID-19 death is a 61-year-old man in Washington County, who tested positive on March 21, 2020, and died on April 1, 2020 at Tuality Healthcare. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s twenty-first COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old woman in Marion County, who tested positive on March 31, 2020, and died on April 1, 2020 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Update: The COVID-19 case data OHA publishes once a day on its website and shares once a day with the media are provisional and subject to change. A case reported yesterday as a Douglas County case was later determined to be a Lane County case. The total number of new cases in Lane County is 3 to reflect this change. However, the case moved from Douglas County to Lane County is not reflected in the total of new cases statewide for today.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



City Officials Ask Travelers Arriving at Redmond Airport to Voluntarily Self-Quarantine

 

REDMOND, OREGON – As of April 1, 2020 Deschutes County has 27 confirmed COVID-19 cases.  With a surge in cases expected to intensify later this month, officials across the region are urging people to take steps to reduce the spread of contamination to alleviate pressures on our hospitals.  Consistent with this approach, the City of Redmond owned Redmond Municipal Airport (RDM) will immediately begin encouraging all airport passengers to do a 14-day in home self-quarantine upon arrival in Central Oregon. 

 

“These actions are difficult, but they will help flatten the curve and lay the groundwork for a quicker recovery,” states Mayor George Endicott.

 

With the virus spreading more each day, this recommendation is being made regardless of the originating airport.  RDM is currently experience a 90% reduction in travelers passing through the terminal, down from a daily average of 1,500.

 

Individuals who develop symptoms during their voluntarily self-quarantine should contact their medical provider immediately.  For general questions about the virus and/or symptoms call the free COVID-19 non-emergency hotline at 541-699-5109, open from 8 a.m. to 6:30 p.m., Monday to Friday. The hotline connects callers with caregivers and county health professionals.

 

This recommendation is another important measure to protect the health and safety of our community.

 



BEND, OR -- The COVID-19 Pandemic is causing changes at the Deschutes County Jail. Sheriff’s Department Sergeant William Bailey says they have reduced the inmate population by asking partner police agencies to cite and release for lower level offenses. However, if a person has committed a serious crime and has symptoms, they can be placed in a medical jail cell with negative air pressure to prevent virus spread. Bailey says they are separating and social distancing inmates as much as possible.

 



BEND, OR -- Saint Charles Health is asking the public to help them by donating 10-thousand, hand-sewn masks for caregivers. The St Charles website has instructions and details how to make the masks. Lisa Goodman at the hospital says the tie-behind-the-head masks have a space where a filter can be inserted. She says donated masks will be used by caregivers who are not in contact with COVID-19 patients. Caregivers in contact with COVID-19 patients will only use CDC approved masks. If you don’t sew but want to help, the St Charles Foundation will take money donations to help caregivers whose families have been financially impacted.



Crook County is reporting its first confirmed case of COVID-19.  The Oregon Health Authority reports 1 new fatality in Oregon bringing the state’s death toll to 19. There are 47 new cases with the statewide total rising to 736. There are 3 new cases in Deschutes county bringing the total to 28. Still no confirmed cases in Jefferson county. In a related item, Deschutes County Commissioners are prohibiting short-term rental stays in the unincorporated areas of the county to reduce exposure and spread.



******  First Positive COVID-19 Case in Crook County  ****** 
The Crook County Health Department reports today the first presumptive positive case of COVID-19 in Crook County.  The Health Department in partnership with the County and City will continue to respond to this declared emergency.  For some time now it has been known the virus is present in the community, and now through the ability to do more relaxed testing it will be possible to identify positive cases.   
 
As of today, Crook County has 1 presumptive positive COVID-19 case. This does seem to be travel related. There is no hospitalization currently. This individual is fully cooperating with public health. 
 
As novel coronavirus – aka COVID-19 – continues to spread, local health officials stress that the health and wellbeing of our community is paramount.  The safety of staff and community members are the highest priority and efforts will continue around releasing updates to the public with the most current information and guidelines available.  
 
The leadership of Crook County and the City of Prineville respects and values the privacy of community members and the confidentiality regarding medical information. Therefore, no identifiable information will be released about presumptive or confirmed cases in Crook County. 
 
Crook County Health Department Communicable Disease team has already started working diligently to identify and notify all known contacts of the presumptive positive case through case investigation.  o Case investigation includes identifying all known contacts of the presumptive positive cases so proper notification and risk assessment can occur. This allows local public health to then apply monitoring requirements set-forth by the Centers for Disease Control and Oregon Health Authority. o The process is to identify how the patients were exposed and who else may have been exposed. That work is underway now and will be ongoing for this and any future cases identified in Crook County. 
CROOK COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT “A Healthy and Safe Future for the People of Crook County” 375 NW Beaver St., Suite 100    Prineville, OR 97754 Telephone: (541) 447-5165     Fax (541) 447-3093 
o Status on investigation of known contacts is ongoing.  Currently all persons under monitoring are cooperative and following the guidance. o Any persons under monitoring will be monitored by Crook County Health Department for a minimum of 14 days. 
  Crook County Health Department has been part of a Tri-County response around COVID-19 since the first of March and will continue to work closely with neighboring counties along with our local city and county organizations. 
 
Local Public Health and the Oregon Health Authority continue to recommend people in Oregon take everyday precautions to prevent the spread of many respiratory illnesses, including COVID-19 and influenza - The CDC is recommending non-pharmaceutical interventions to slow the spread of COVID-19, and other respiratory infections (including flu and pertussis) by taking everyday preventive actions, including: 
• If you feel sick, call ahead to your healthcare provider to discuss whether or not you need to be seen.   • Cover your coughs and sneezes with a tissue and then throw the tissue in the trash. • Wash your hands often with soap and water for 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands. • Clean and disinfect surfaces that are often touched. • Take care of your health overall. Staying current on your vaccinations, including flu vaccine, eating well and exercising all help your body stay resilient. • Consult CDC’s travel website for any travel advisories and steps to protect yourself if you plan to travel outside of the US. • Stay home if you are sick and talk with your employer now about a plan if you do become ill and cannot show up for work. • It is advised that anyone with compromised immune systems, chronic medical conditions and the elderly not attend large events and practice social distancing to protect yourselves. 
For more information or general questions contact: Crook County Health Department 375 NW Beaver Street, Suite 100 Prineville, OR 97754 Office:  541-447-5165 
 
If you have questions about COVID-19, call 541-699-5109, Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 6:30 p.m. The call center is set up to take your calls.  You may also call 211 for general inquiries.   
 



Beware of scammers trying to get your personal information or your COVID-19 Economic Impact Payment!

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) will begin to distribute COVID-19 Economic Impact Payments in a matter of weeks. For most Americans, this will be a direct deposit into your bank account. For the unbanked, elderly or other groups that have traditionally received tax refunds via paper check, they will receive their economic impact payments in this manner as well.

With any good news story from the IRS, comes an opportunity for criminals and scammers to take advantage of the American public.

  • Scammers may try to get you to sign over your check to them.
  • Scammers may use this as an opportunity to get you to “verify” your filing information in order to receive your money, using your personal information to file false tax returns in an identity theft scheme.

Between these two schemes, everyone receiving an economic impact payment is at risk.

The Internal Revenue Service – Criminal Investigation (IRS-CI) is working tirelessly alongside our civil counterparts and law enforcement partners to identify scams and halt wrongdoers from taking advantage of the American people. “Taxpayers should be extra vigilant for unsolicited phone calls or emails concerning their economic impact payments,” said Justin Campbell, Special Agent in Charge of the Seattle Field Office for IRS-CI. “The IRS will not call or email you about your payment. IRS-Criminal Investigation is stepping up our efforts in coordination with the Department of Justice to aggressively investigate anyone that seeks to defraud our community members during this crisis.”

“We are aware of instances of consumer fraud stemming from the COVID-19 public health emergency. While Americans work to protect themselves and their loved ones from the threat of COVID-19, some individuals are actively trying to profit off of this emergency,” said U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams. “If you or someone you know believe you’ve been the target or victim of an outbreak-related fraud scheme, please contact law enforcement immediately.”

Top Line Message from the Internal Revenue Service


The IRS will deposit your economic impact payment into the direct deposit account your previously provide on your tax return (or, in the alternative, send you a paper check). The IRS will not call and ask you to verify your payment details. Do not give out your bank account, debit account, or PayPal account information – even if someone claims it is necessary to get your economic impact payment. Beware of this scam.

If you receive a call, do not engage with scammers or thieves. Just hang up. If you receive texts or emails claiming that you can get your money faster by sending personal information or clicking on links, delete them. Do not click on any links in those emails.

Reports are also swirling about bogus checks. If you receive a “check” in the mail now, it’s fraud – it will take the Treasury Department a few weeks to distribute the payments. If you receive a “check” for an odd amount (especially one with cents), or a check that requires that you verify the check online or by calling a number, it’s fraud.

Beware of Scams and Schemes


IRS-Impersonation Telephone Scams

An aggressive and sophisticated phone scam targeting taxpayers, including recent immigrants, have been making the rounds throughout the country. Callers claim to be employees of the IRS, but are not. Victims are told they owe money to the IRS and it must be paid promptly through a pre-loaded debit card or wire transfer. If the victim refuses to cooperate, they are then threatened with arrest, deportation or suspension of a business or driver’s license. Or, victims may be told they have a refund due to try to trick them into sharing private information.

With COVID-19 scams, they may urge you to pay this fake “debt” with your economic impact check. For those who receive an actual check, they may ask you to endorse it and forward to them for “payment of past debts.”

Remember:  Scammer Change Tactics – Variations of the IRS impersonation scam continue year-round and they tend to peak when scammers find prime opportunities to strike – like the new economic impact check being sent.

Surge in Email, Phishing and Malware Schemes

Scam emails are designed to trick taxpayers into thinking these are official communications from the IRS, tax industry professionals or tax software companies. These phishing emails ask taxpayers about a wide range of topics – related to refunds, filing status, ordering transcripts, and verifying PIN information – in order to steal your personal information or file tax returns.

When people click on links from these phishing emails, they are taken to sites designed to imitate an official-looking website, such as IRS.gov. The sites may also carry malware, which can infect people’s computers to steal their files or record their keystrokes.

Also be aware of email phishing scams that appear to be from the IRS and include a link to a bogus web site intended to mirror the official IRS web site. These emails contain the direction “you are to update your IRS e-file immediately.” The emails mention USA.gov and IRSgov (without a dot between “IRS” and “gov”). Don’t get scammed. These emails are not from the IRS.

Don’t be a victim! Visit www.irs.gov or www.irs.gov/coronavirus



Oregon reports 1 new COVID-19 death, 47 new COVID-19 cases

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 19, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 47 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (6), Deschutes (3), Douglas (1), Jackson (1), Lane (2), Lincoln (1), Marion (10), Multnomah (18), Washington (3), and Yamhill (1). One case previously reported in Hood River County was identified as a resident of another state; thus, today’s statewide case count is 736. Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s nineteenth COVID-19 death is a 70-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 27, 2020, and died on March 29, 2020 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Update: The COVID-19 case data OHA publishes once a day on its website and shares once a day with the media are provisional and subject to change. A case reported yesterday as a Hood River County case was later determined to be a Washington State case. The total number of new cases reported as of yesterday has changed from 690 to 689.

Latest COVID-19 projections show social distancing can cut coronavirus infections if Oregonians keep current measures in place into May

Updated projections from health researchers show that there is “strong evidence that measures currently in place in Oregon are reducing transmission,” according to the latest models.  The most recent data suggest that current social distancing measures could cut transmission rates between 50%-70% if Oregonians maintain these limitations on virus-spreading interactions into early May.

If Oregonians can maintain current social distancing efforts and the current projections hold true, the state could meet the likely demand for hospital beds under current strategies. 

According to the latest report, researchers estimate that Oregon has slightly higher numbers of current infections than previously assessed, based on an increase in reported cases from earlier time points.

  • COVID-19 infections: Under current social distancing conditions with the cooperation of most Oregonians to Stay Home, Save Lives, it is estimated that in early May Oregon would have over 4,000 cumulative infections and 200-1,200 active infections. However, if the state were to reopen non-essential businesses (while keeping schools closed), the number of new infections would spike to as many as 3,500 active infections by early May
  • Hospital beds needed: Researchers found “expected demand for hospital beds is predicted to remain relatively constant before decreasing, assuming current or strengthened interventions and continued high compliance
  • Uncertainty: Researchers highlighted that the projections remain uncertain. In coming weeks, state public health officials and researchers will get a better picture of current actual infections and how they affect the projections, as well as more data on the public’s continued adherence to social distancing measures.

The models state health officials released today were prepared by the Institute for Disease Modeling, based in Washington.

Oregon’s emergency response continues to focus on strengthening the health care system’s ability to meet the coming surge. State health officials are working with hospitals and other health care partners to mobilize the health care workforce and keep workers safe, expand bed capacity and secure more ventilators. However, the public’s ability to maintain social distancing will be the most important factor in determining whether Oregon prevents local hospitals from becoming overwhelmed by COVID-19 admissions.

Dr. Dean Sidelinger, state health officer at OHA, said: “We know coronavirus has brought painful disruption and distress for Oregonians. However, these numbers tell us that what we’re doing can work. We know social distancing is tough and comes with incredible sacrifices. But steps we’re all taking to maintain social distancing could save the lives of people we know and people who are important to us. As Oregonians, we all must continue to put Stay Home, Save Lives into practice.”


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



REDMONDM, OR  -- Yesterday morning   Redmond Police responded to a reported burglary at the Eagle Rock Apartments.  A 911 caller reported a person had broken in through a locked door. After being threatened, the victim fired two shots into the floor of the apartment.  The suspect, 26-year-old James Bonner III of Redmond, fled but was later taken into custody without incident. Police say drug activity was not a factor in this crime



bend, or -- This Saturday April 4th is the Boy Scouts are teaming up to help local non-profit agencies with food and supplies. The event is known as Boy Scout Community Action Day.  Scoutmaster Brian Seed with Troop 21 says they have a list of what the various organizations need on their webpage. There will be four drop off sites in Bend and one each in Prineville and LaPine Saturday from 10 to 2. The Community Action Day has been declared a "necessary event" by the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Department of Labor. For more information log on to coscoutscare.org.

 



REDMOND, OR -- The Redmond School District has announced Dr. Charan Cline of Yamhill, Ore. will be the new Superintendent of Schools, replacing the retiring Mike McIntosh.  The board of directors hosted interviews with four finalists on March 9 and March 10 and selected Cline as the final candidate during a special board meeting yesterday. He will assume his new responsibilities on July first. Photo Credit Central Oregon Daily News



BEND, OR -- The number of calls to the state of Oregon’s Child Abuse Hotline has dropped 70-per cent since the closure of K-12 schools. Rachel Visser at the Kids Center says children no longer have access to teachers, counselors and other adults they trust and this could lead to a spike in abuse cases.  Visser says the Kids Center is stepping up its education campaign with new blogs about preventing child abuse and neglect on their webpage. She also urges people who suspect a child is being abused, to contact police or make a report to the Department of Human Services Child Abuse Hotline.

 



BENDK, OR  -- The Central Oregon unemployment rate looked really good in February. Economist Damon Runberg says Deschutes county dropped to 3-point4-per cent…Crook county was at 5-per cent and Jefferson county at 4-and a half per cent. Runberg says those numbers will certainly show an increase in the March report. He says that‘s because the reference week will include March 12th  which was before the COVID-19 restrictions started taking hold across the nation. Runberg expects the April report will tell the really bad news about unemployment.



Additional resources for reporting “stay home” order violations; Supporting St. Charles; Reusable grocery bags; Daily update 3.31.20

REPORTING VIOLATIONS OF ‘STAY HOME, SAVE LIVES’ EXECUTIVE ORDER

Individuals who have questions about Gov. Kate Brown’s executive order limiting business and increasing social distancing requirements can learn more online. Community members who witness a violation of the order can utilize the following resources (NOTE: Do not call 9-1-1.)

For Employees: Oregon OSHA is taking complaints from employees regarding apparent violations of the Governor’s COVID-19 executive order by their employer, in particular social distancing protocol in the workplace. Employees should contact Oregon OSHA if they feel their employer is violating the order: 503-378-3272 or 800-922-2689 (Oregon only); email tech.web@oregon.gov; or use the Online report form.

For General Public: Deschutes County Health Services Environmental Health is responding to complaints of apparent violations of the Governor’s order related to restaurants, pools and hotels. To report an apparent violation at one of the facilities listed above, Contact Environmental Health at 541-317-3114 or use the Online report form.

Bend Park & Recreation District: Community members can call 541-389-7275 during business hours if they observe park use that is not allowed at this time. After hours and on weekends, call 541-388-5435 to report incidents in parks and trails. The district has limited staff resources and is asking for public compliance with park closures, signs and other markings on closed amenities.

Those who believe they see a violation of the “Stay Home, Save Lives” order that don’t fit into these descriptions can call Police non-emergency at 541-693-6911. The Governor’s order is enforceable by law enforcement.

GIVING TO ST. CHARLES FOUNDATION

St. Charles Health System does not have any active crowdfunding campaigns. Anyone who would like to support caregivers and St. Charles’ response to COVID-19 can give at https://foundation.stcharleshealthcare.org/Donate or call 541-706-6969. Each gift, no matter how large or small, is needed and appreciated, and will be used to support caregivers and patients, and allow the health system to meet the needs of our community during this epidemic.

CAN REUSABLE GROCERY BAGS SPREAD COVID-19?

¿Puede propagarse COVID-19 en las bolsas de supermercado reutilizables?

According to the CDC, touching a surface that may have the virus on it is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads. Potential exposure to COVID-19 from handling reusable grocery bags is low, but the Oregon Department of Agriculture has the following recommendations to reduce risk even further:

  • Shopping bags should be washed after every use when carrying food just as you would launder a kitchen towel. Canvas or cloth bags can be laundered in the washer following manufacturer instructions. The inside of plastic-lined bags should be scrubbed using hot water and soap.
  • For all types of grocery shopping bags, remove any inserts (many are cardboard), turn each bag inside out before washing, and pay special attention to the nooks and crannies around the seams. Clean any inserts with a disinfecting spray cleaner and follow the disinfectant label instructions.
  • Find more info about food safety on ODA’s COVID-19 webpage: bit.ly/ODA-COVID19

ABOUT COEIN
COEIN’s website, www.coemergencyinfo.blogspot.com provides a collective resource for up-to-date information. Access to accurate, timely information both locally and nationally is encouraged. Our County Public Health experts point to the Oregon Health Authority and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as good sources of information.

Daily situation updates are available via email at http://bit.ly/COVID19UPDATES

Central Oregon Emergency Information Network (COEIN), includes Deschutes County Health Services, Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, St. Charles Health System, Crook County Health Department, Crook County Sheriff’s Office, Jefferson County Health Department, Jefferson County Sheriff’s Department, tri-county public schools, City of Bend, Bend Police, Bend Fire & Rescue, and others. COEIN’s purpose is to collect, coordinate and distribute timely and accurate information.

Nationwide, concerns surrounding COVID-19 have led to incidents of harassment and discrimination, particularly against Asian Americans. There is no place for discrimination — in Oregon, or anywhere. The Oregon Department of Justice urges Oregonians to report acts of hate or bias at 844-924-BIAS (2424).


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