Local News Archives for 2020-11


A 37 year old convicted felon from La Pine is facing charges of reckless driving, resisting arrest, meth possession and manufacturing, and possession of a firearm tied to a 40 mile an hour chase in La Pine Sunday night along Sunrise Blvd.  Deschutes County Sheriff’s Deputies arrested 37-year old James Bruce when the Subaru he was driving skid on some ice and slammed into a tree at Pinetree Drive.  Deputies say Bruce was in possession of ten grams of meth and a handgun found in the snow near the car.



If you live in Bend and you want to help a less fortunate senior in the community this holiday season, you can do it by taking advantage of today’s Cyber Monday sales.  The “Be A Santa To A Senior” program launched in 2003, and the program’s Malia Eley says it’s already doled out more than two million gifts to seniors nationwide since then.  Here in Bend you can donate to a senior in our community through a gift purchase on Amazon Business - their new partner this year - through December 18th.  Seniors can use the basics – including toiletries and personal care items.

For more info, go to “beasantabend.com”.



City officials in Bend have joined with advocates for the homeless to try and get Bend Parks and Rec to waive a fee now charged to housing developers in an effort to bring more affordable housing units into the city.  The systems development charges that the developers are now being charged pay for new parks and new trails in the city, as well as repairs to existing ones.  The Bend Park and Recreation District waived the fees last year to add 400 affordable housing units through the year 2022 …but with two years left before that deadline, funds have already been earmarked for 380 of those units and the city says more are needed.  City officials are trying to get the district to get rid of the fees altogether.  District officials are meeting to talk about what that would mean for longer-term recreation in the city.  As the population in Bend continues to swell, the fear is there won’t be enough new parks to meet the recreational needs of the population.



A petition that the Oregon Nursing Association says has been signed by more than 160 healthcare providers in the Bend area has been presented to executives at St. Charles Bend.  It accuses the facility with neglecting to provide adequate staffing - forcing nurses to work to the point of burnout - and asking staffers to return to work early from Covid quarantine.  It also claims the facility has asked medical personnel to re-use single-use masks beyond safety recommendations.  KBND spoke to St. Charles Bend C-O-O Iman Simmons last week, and she said preparations at St. Charles for a surge in Covid have been ongoing for months, and told us they don’t have any issues tied to staffing.



The unemployment rate continues to dip in Central Oregon. State Employment Department Economist Damon Runberg says Deschutes county dropped to 7-point-3-per cent from 8-per cent in September. He says Crook county fell a full percentage point to 8-per cent in October and Jefferson county dropped to 7-point-5-per cent from 8-point-4 per cent. Runberg says the October numbers don’t reflect the Governor’s two-week freeze on business activity. He says the November report is expected to see some changes in the unemployment rate because of the freeze.

 



BEND, OR -- The CEO of Saint Charles Health System, Joe Sluka, is urging Central Oregon residents to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. Central Oregon Daily reports Sluka released a YouTube video yesterday. He said this is not a hoax, this is not a scare tactics, this is the truth. Sluka noted there had been a low incidence of the virus in our area…he says those days are over and we now have more cases than ever before. He says in the coming weeks plans will be announced to distribute a vaccine to fight the virus. He urges everyone to wear a mask, social distance and wash hands.

 



A significant cache of marijuana, cocaine, and firearms confiscated in a residential drug bust this week has a La Pine man facing multiple drug and firearms possession charges.  A SWAT team from the Dechutes County Sheriff’s Department raided the home of 27 year old Dylan Stronks in the 53-thousand block of Woodstock Drive in La Pine this week and found more than 500 pot plants and 55 pounds of dried marijuana, a butane hash oil lab, and 14 firearms including a sawed off shotgun.  The department had been watching Stronks since April after getting complaints from residents in the community who thought he was growing pot and operating a drug den at his home.



The recent surge in Covid cases in Dechutes County is prompting the county health agency to beef up staffing to meet the growing needs of the pandemic.  Emergency Preparedness Coordinator Morgan Emerson says it’s a pro-active step they’re taking to stay ahead of the need.  They’ll be adding add two public health nurses, two administrators, a health officer, a health educator, and a public information officer.  The goal is to get the new hires in place by the beginning of the new year.

 



Amid the many changes during the Governor’s two-week freeze tied to Covid this holiday season are schedule adjustments to programs run by Bend Parks and Rec.  Community Relations Manager Julie Brown says they’ve had to put a pause on their public skate sessions, but she says some of their skate lessons and learn to play hockey programs are still being held at the Pavillion.



Plenty of opposition being voiced to Governor Brown’s pandemic restrictions on business activity and social gatherings for the Thanksgiving holiday.  Massive rallies with a hundred protestors or more in Bend – others in Redmond, La Pine, and Madras – all voicing the “we will not comply” message.  Those taking part say they understand the risks surrounding Covid but contend they’re no different than the risks posed by the other seasonal illnesses we see every year, and they resent being told what to do with their own families for the holiday.  Meantime, Health officials in Deschutes County are begging residents to take every precaution they can, especially in light of the alarming jump in Covid cases and deaths reported over several days last week – more than a thousand new or suspected cases several days in a row, and the state’s Covid death toll now topping 800.

 



BEND, OR -- The I Like Pie Fun Run and Walk on Thanksgiving morning is being held but with a different format due to COVID-19. Race Organizer Scott Douglass says families should get out and all run or walk together wherever they want. He also says families don’t have to do the run or walk Thanksgiving morning…instead they can do it any day of this week up to and including Sunday of Thanksgiving weekend. He asks families to take photo's amnd post them to social media. To register go to “I Like Pie Bend-dot-com”. All of the proceeds are being donated to Neighbor-Impact and Girls on the Run. Douglas also says the first 2500 people to register receive "really cool" I Like Pie beanie.

 



BEND, OR -- Shepherd’s House Ministries is asking the public to help donate “Give One” or “Take One” food boxes to those who are unemployed, homeless or experiencing hardships. Items to donate to help a family of 4 includes an 8-to-12 pound turkey, a box of stuffing, 1 box scalloped or mashed potatoes, canned green beans and cranberry sauce and a pie. Anyone needing a food box can pick one up tomorrow, Tuesday, from Noon to 5pm at Shepherd’s House, 1854 NE Division Street.



Deschutes County Elections Clerk Nancy Blankenship certified the November election on Friday. She says more than 85-per cent of voters cast ballots. We asked if any political races or ballot measure outcomes changed and she said no. This means incumbent Republican State Senator Tim Knopp defeated challenger Eileeen Keily by 1586 votes. Blankenship says before the vote they got questions about security and after the election questions about signature verification and how that works. She says unlike 2016 they found no evidence of any intentional fraud.

 



The Oregon State Police reported Friday that a body found November 17th in Jackson county was that of 33 year old Matthew Lang of Bend. On October 27th police reported finding a badly damaged Ford Explorer that had been in a rollover wreck with no occupants on Highway 62. Lang had not contacted friends or family since the wreck. On Tuesday, November 17th a Jackson County Sheriff’s Deputy found a body in the river several hundred yards from the crash off Highway 62. The State Police Medical Examiner confirmed the identity of Lang.



A teenager from Redmond is facing manslaughter charges in connection with a hit and run early Friday night in Redmond that killed a 90 year old man as he was walking across Northwest Sixth Street just north of Kingwood Avenue. Police say the victim – 90 year old Leroy Hall –was initially run down by 19 year old Anthony Vasquez who was driving a 2018 GMC Yukon, and then was struck a second time by another car.  The second driver stayed at the scene.  Vasquez sped off but cops stopped him a few minutes later at Southwest 15th and Metolius, where he was arrested. 

 



New Assistance Program For Oregon Restaurants Battling Covid-19 Losses

 

Restaurant owners in Bend and throughout the state are being offered a new helping hand. It’s in the form of free business consulting services being offered through “The Oregon Restaurant Covid Assistance Program.” The state’s Small Business Development Center is working with the Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association to launch the new resource to help restaurant owners in the state weather the economic impact of the Covid-19 pandemic. The program includes a network of seven professional restaurant consultants on hand to provide restaurant owners with free resources including menu planning, employee management, financial analysis, and landlord negotiations. To find out more, visit “Oregon-s-b-d-c dot org.”



Restaurant association files federal lawsuit against freeze on business activity

 

The Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association has filed a suit in federal court in conjunction with the Restaurant Law Center challenging the legality of the Governor’s buiness freeze mandate. Executive Director of the R-L-C Angelo Amador says the restaurant industry in the state has gone to great lengths to follow federal, state, and local pandemic guidelines to keep their workers and patrons safe, and says the blanket ban on indoor and outdoor dining is unfair when - according to the latest state health department stats - restaurants aren’t the primary place the virus is being spread.

 

 

 



DONATE A FOOD BOX TO THE NEEDY THROUGH SHEPHERD'S HOUSE (PHOTO)

 

News Release from Shepherd's House Ministries
 

Thanksgiving Food Boxes- Give One OR Take One

Give One
These food boxes are intended for those in the community who are unemployed, experiencing hardships, are homeless, or just in need of a helping hand. 
 
Can you help us meet this need by Donating a Thanksgiving Food Box? 
 
If you would like to participate, please drop off your items at Shepherd's House, 1854 NE Division Street from Sunday, November 22 through Monday, November 23rd.
 
Suggested items to include for a family of 4
1 small turkey  (8-12 lbs.)
1 box stuffing
1 box scalloped or mashed potatoes
2 cans green beans
1 can cranberry sauce
1 pie
1 box or bag
 
Take One
There is Help for You! For those needing a Thanksgiving Food Box, you can pick yours up on Tuesday, November 24th from noon until 5 pm at 1854 NE Division Street in Bend. 



Deschutes County certifies Nov. 3 General Election results

 

Deschutes County Clerk Nancy Blankenship has certified the County’s Nov. 3 General Election results and forwarded final results to the State.

 

Since Election Day on Nov. 3, elections staff has been adjudicating ballots to determine voter intent, counting votes, documenting votes for one “no candidate filed” race, contacting voters with signature challenges and curing signature challenges so that all votes are counted.

 

85.28% of the 150,696 eligible Deschutes County voters returned ballots.

 

“I want to thank every single one of you who cast a ballot during the 2020 General Election,” said Blankenship. “We saw record early voting this year and heard from many that were first time voters. It’s always exciting to see residents cast ballots and make their voices heard.”

 

Final election results are available at www.deschutes.org/electionresults.

 

 

 
 
 


UPDATE - Oregon State Police Requesting Assistance Locating Driver Involved in Crash - Jackson County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 11/20/20 10:59 AM

 

On Tuesday, November 17, 2020 a Jackson County Sheriff Deputy located a body in the river several hundred yards from the crash site. The Oregon State Police Medical Examiners office has confirmed the body is that of Matthew Lang.

No further information is available for release.

 

On Tuesday, October 27, 2020 at approximately 5:30 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle rollover crash on Hwy 62 near milepost 37. Responders located a badly damaged Ford Explorer with no occupants. It is believed the operator was Matthew Lang (33) of Bend.  Lang has not contacted friends or family since the crash. Jackson County Search and Rescue is currently searching the area for Lang.   

Lang is 6 feet tall 185 lbs with brown hair.



Oregon reports 1,306 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 4 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed four more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 812, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported a record high 1,306 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 62,175.

All Oregonians can play a role in turning the tide of COVID-19 by wearing face coverings, keep physically distant, and restrict their social gatherings to one other household.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (8), Benton (15), Clackamas (78), Clatsop (9), Columbia (20), Coos (8), Crook (2), Curry (5), Deschutes (60), Douglas (39), Grant (27), Harney (4), Hood River (3), Jackson (84), Jefferson (11), Josephine (18), Klamath (39), Lake (3), Lane (91), Lincoln (7), Linn (27), Malheur (23), Marion (112), Morrow (3), Multnomah (337), Polk (21), Tillamook (2), Umatilla (45), Union (17), Wasco (13), Washington (155), and Yamhill (20).

Oregon’s 809th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old man in Douglas County who tested positive on Nov. 9 and died on Nov. 14 at Bay Area Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 810th COVID-19 death is an 83-year old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 11 and died on Nov. 18 at Legacy Mt. Hood Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 811th COVID-19 death is a 70-year-old man in Klamath County who tested positive on Nov. 15 and died on Nov. 17 at St. Charles Medical Center in Bend. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 812th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old woman in Harney County who tested positive on Nov. 12 and died on Nov. 18 at Harney District Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon to change COVID-19 testing reporting

Watch today's medial availability

 

Responding to the pressures of surging cases, OHA is changing the way testing of people with COVID-19 is tracked. Early in the pandemic the number of new people tested were measured. People who tested negative were counted only once, no matter how many negative tests administered to them. That had the effect of undercounting the number of COVID-19 tests that were actually performed.

Since then testing has greatly expanded and the state’s capacity has increased significantly and that is leading to a recalculation of testing that will be based on the number of tests administered.

Measuring testing in Oregon person-based v test based methodsMeasuring testing in Oregon person-based v test based percent positivity

According to Dr. Melissa Sutton, the lead medical expert for testing strategy, 916,000 people – approximately one in four Oregonians have been tested for COVID-19. Oregon ranks 30th among states in testing.

COVID-19 hospitalizations continue to rise

The number of hospitalized COVID-19 patients across Oregon decreased to 412, two fewer than yesterday.

There are 91 COVID-19 patients in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) beds, five fewer than yesterday.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



On Thursday, November 19, 2020 at approximately 5:15 P.M., Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to a multi-vehicle crash on Hwy 97 near milepost 137. 

Preliminary investigation revealed a BMW, operated by Jonathan Short (39) of Bend, was northbound merging onto Hwy 97 from the Colorado Rd onramp.  The BMW merged through the right (slow) lane and into the left (fast) lane and struck a Chevrolet pickup operated by Kevin Schultz (47) of Bend.  The Chevrolet pickup crossed the center median into the southbound lane and collided with a Ford Transit van operated by Christopher Rodea (37) of Bend.

Two more southbound vehicles were involved in the crash and one more northbound vehicle was involved in the crash.  None of these operators or passengers were seriously injured.

Rodea sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Schultz was transported to St Charles Hospital in Bend with serious injuries.

Short was not transported for injuries.  

Hwy 97 was closed for approximately 8 hours.

OSP was assisted by the Bend Police Department, Bend Fire Department, Deschutes County Sheriff's Office and ODOT.

Oregon State Police is requesting any additional witnesses to the crash to contact the OSP Northern Command Center at 1-800-442-0776 or *OSP and leave contact information for Trooper Sean Malloy.



Update on Temporary Transitional Shelter Site at Juniper Ridge

 

On Oct. 21, the Bend City Council supported a staff plan to explore options for a temporary transitional shelter site on City-owned property in Juniper Ridge. Evaluation of the feasibility of the temporary site is in preliminary stages. City staff are working with nonprofit services organizations, neighborhood leaders and partner agencies to develop plans for community safety and on-site services for the managed temporary transitional shelter site, to help address concerns from neighboring property owners and businesses. 

 

City staff are currently working with social services professionals to create strategies for things like service provision, case management, on-site sanitation, property management, public safety and other items related to proper management of the proposed temporary site. 

 

“We are fortunate to work with medical and social services professionals with subject matter expertise in serving our homeless community,” said City Economic Development Director Carolyn Eagan. “It will take all of us working together with the neighboring residents and business owners to build a safe, accessible temporary shelter site that supports the individuals and families who will temporarily call it home.”

 

As part of the planning process, City staff are identifying a potential location for the site. Staff are focusing on a City-owned parcel in Juniper Ridge that is currently being used as a rock-crushing site for the North Interceptor Sewer Line Project. As that rock-crushing operation moves further north in early 2021, it will leave behind a cleared, graded site. The availability of a cleared and graded site will save time and significantly reduce the cost of developing the temporary transitional shelter site. This potential location is also further north of Cooley Road, which would provide separation between the site and neighbors south of Juniper Ridge.

 

During the plan development, there will be opportunities for community members to learn more and provide input through online meetings. These online meetings will provide neighbors, social services providers and other stakeholders a chance to be involved as the feasibility for this proposed site is evaluated. The online meetings will be in early December and the City will release the date, time and links to the online meetings when that information is available.

 

A temporary transitional shelter site at Juniper Ridge is one of many short-term solutions to help address homelessness in Bend. To learn more about other temporary transitional shelter sites or to apply to establish a shelter site, visit the Temporary Transitional Shelter Sites page.

 

Mid- and long-term solutions, like extending winter warming shelters for more months or building additional affordable housing units, are also necessary to support community members as they transition out of homelessness and into stable housing. To learn more about the continuum of housing needed in Bend, visit the Emergency Homelessness Task Force page.

 



Portland, Oregon – Today, the Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association (ORLA) and the Restaurant Law Center (RLC) filed a joint complaint in federal court for injunctive relief from the “Two-Week Freeze” mandated by the Governor, which prohibits indoor and outdoor dining in restaurants from November 18 through December 2. This action was taken to save many restaurants around the state, and to protect the livelihoods of thousands of food service workers who rely on restaurants and their customers. Both restaurants and their employees continue to suffer from the devastating effects of ongoing regulatory orders in Oregon during this pandemic.

“The restaurant industry prefers engaging in partnerships with our leaders in government,” said Jason Brandt, President and CEO of ORLA. “The latest restaurant restrictions in Executive Order 20-65 published on November 17 lack equity and due process. We hope to engage in communication with Governor Kate Brown and her professional staff as soon as possible to work towards a resolution that has not been available to us at this stage. In the meantime, Oregon’s restaurant operators must continue to follow all orders executed by the Governor until a federal court addresses the serious legal concerns brought forth by the industry.”

“The number one priority of America’s restaurant industry is to provide a safe and healthy environment for guests and employees,” said Angelo Amador, Executive Director of the Restaurant Law Center. “The industry is following applicable federal, state and local operating guidelines, and, where necessary, adapted their business models and adopted countless new measures to ensure that diners and workers remain safe. A blanket ban on indoor and outdoor dining is wrong and we believe the latest executive order in Oregon is also illegal. We hope our Complaint will encourage the Governor and other officials to meet to develop a more reasonable and pragmatic approach that protects the livelihood of restaurant industry workers and restaurateurs across the state.”

Click here to read the Complaint.

About the Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association
The 
Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association is the leading business association for the foodservice and lodging industry in Oregon, which is comprised of approximately 10,000 foodservice locations and 2,000 lodging establishments with a workforce prior to COVID of 183,191.

 



Friday, November 20, 2020

 

Commercial Dungeness crab season delayed

 

NEWPORT, Ore – The Dec. 1 commercial Dungeness crab season is delayed until at least Dec. 16 for the entire Oregon coast as testing shows crabs are too low in meat yield.

 

The ocean commercial Dungeness crab season in Oregon, targeted to open Dec. 1, can be delayed to ensure a high-quality product for consumers and to avoid wasting the resource. Crab quality testing in early November showed a number of the test areas did not meet the criteria for a Dec. 1 opening. The delayed opening will allow crabs to fill with more meat.

 

A second round of crab quality testing will occur after Thanksgiving and results will be used to determine if the season should open Dec. 16, be further delayed, or be split into areas with different opening dates.

 

In partnership with the Oregon Dungeness Crab Commission and the commercial Dungeness crab industry, ODFW tests crabs out of Oregon’s six major crabbing ports. Weekly season opening updates are posted online until the decision to open the season is made.

 

Crabs were also tested for domoic acid along the entire coast, and all samples were found to be safe for human consumption. However, due to elevated levels of domoic acid detected in razor clams in some areas, testing in Dungeness crabs will continue regularly north of Cape Perpetua.

 

In conjunction with the delayed ocean commercial season, commercial harvest of Dungeness crab in Oregon bays that are currently open will close at 12:01 a.m. Dec. 1 but may reopen if the ocean commercial fishery opens in December.

 

Recreational Dungeness crab harvest in the ocean off Oregon opens Dec. 1 as scheduled in all areas. Recreational crab harvesting is currently open coastwide in bays and estuaries, and on beaches, docks, piers, and jetties. Recreational crabbers should always call the Shellfish Hotline (800-448-2474) or visit the ODA Recreational Shellfish Biotoxin Closures webpage before crabbing.

 

Commercial Dungeness crab is Oregon’s most valuable fishery. The 2019 season opening was delayed to Dec. 31 and still brought in the second highest ex-vessel value ever ($72.7 million) with just under 20 million pounds landed, about 12 percent above the 10-year average.

 

Oregon, California and Washington coordinate Dungeness crab quality testing and the commercial season opening dates. California and Washington also are delaying their commercial seasons to at least Dec. 16.

 

 

###

 



BEND, OR -- The governor’s order to freeze elements of the Oregon economy will last until at least December 2nd   Bend City Manager Eric King says they are hearing that many businesses are already struggling plus this is a slow time of year for them as well. He says the state has allocated 55-million dollars to the 36 counties to help businesses to survive. King says the city Council decided this week to enforce mask wearing requirements with fines. He says businesses that have been warned could also face fines for not taking precautions to protect their workers and customers.



Restaurants are back to take out orders only and for some it’s going to be tough. Betsy Mouch (mow-k)  and her husband Ken have owned the Original Pancake House in Bend and Redmond for decades. She says the shutdown last spring was bad enough but the new freeze will present new challenges in part because everything made is from scratch.  Mouk says they’ll also have gift certificates and the popular OHP Coffee Mugs for sale for the holidays. She says take-out orders are available from 7am to 1pm but on weekends they’ll keep filling orders as long as the phone rings.
 



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 

November 19, 2020

 

Oregon Unions: “Rapidly rising COVID-19 infections are a sign we are not doing enough.”

Yesterday, the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) released the weekly COVID-19 infection numbers, revealing the continuation of an alarming trend: Workplace-related infections and deaths continue to climb, pushing infection numbers skyward.  OHA reports 9,973 workplace-related cases of COVID-19, 53 workplace-related deaths, and one-in-six Oregonians who have contracted COVID-19 stem from workplace outbreaks. 

 

This week, Oregon OSHA filed their Emergency Temporary Standard to protect workers from COVID-19 exposure at work. In a release last week, the Oregon AFL-CIO acknowledged the rules as a step closer to workplace safety but with room for improvement as Oregon OSHA drafts the Permanent Standard for airborne viruses such as COVID-19.  

 

Oregon AFL-CIO President Graham Trainor responded to the climbing COVID-19 infections: 

“Oregon’s unions and worker advocates have been clear from the start of the pandemic: Going to work should not be a death sentence.  Oregon OSHA’s Emergency Temporary Standard is a strong step forward, but eight months into this pandemic we are seeing a tremendous increase in cases both at work and throughout our communities.  Oregon has had several high-profile outbreaks at food processing facilities and we know that ventilation will help considerably given the working conditions with places like Pacific Seafood, where workers are in close proximity on a processing line and need to yell over loud machinery to communicate.  We need to keep pushing forward to fully protect all workers from COVID-19:  As we move closer to drafting a Permanent Standard, we must see stronger ventilation requirements for all industries. Infected air needs to be moved out of places of employment and clean air in, and the Emergency Temporary Standard only requires all other employers to optimize their current systems.  Keeping workers safe cannot be done through half-measures.”

 

To find information about workplace outbreak or to file a complaint about your workplace in Oregon, please visit the Oregon AFL-CIO’s searchable database at www.oraflcio.org/osha. We will continue to update this database weekly after the OHA data is released as a resource for Oregonians.   



The Chief Operating Officer of St. Charles Health System in Bend says they’re well ahead of the curve when it comes to planning for a potential influx of Covid cases over the upcoming holidays.  Iman Simmons says they’re working with other skilled care facilities in the area to make sure no one goes without the care they need if they fall victim to Covid.  They call it “surge planning” which she says includes plans they have “at the ready” to provide for additional bed space, equipment, and staff. 



Oregon reports 1225 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 20 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — The Oregon Health Authority today is reporting the largest daily number of COVID-19 cases and deaths since the beginning of the pandemic in Oregon.

“We offer our condolences to everyone who has lost a loved one to COVID-19,” said OHA Director Patrick Allen.

Sadly, we have also surpassed our 800th COVID-19 death today, less than three weeks after marking the 700th death. These are family, friends, neighbors and we note their deaths with sadness and a renewed determination to suppress the spread of the virus.

“I have heard frequently from those who have refused to believe this pandemic is serious if we aren’t seeing hospitalizations and deaths. Those hospitalizations and deaths are here, and are only likely to go up. Please take this seriously, and do what you can to slow the spread: wash your hands, wear a mask, and limit the number of people you come in close contact with.”

NOTE: OHA will hold its weekly media briefing tomorrow Nov. 20 at 11:30 a.m. This will be broadcast via Zoom. Interested media can participate by following this link or by calling in at 1-669-254-5252, passcode 564-743.

COVID-19 has claimed 20 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 808, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 1225 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 60,873.

The new cases are in the following counties: Baker (4), Benton (16), Clackamas (121), Clatsop (2), Columbia (14), Coos (8), Crook (6), Curry (6), Deschutes (31), Douglas (21), Grant (3), Harney (5), Hood River (8), Jackson (89), Jefferson (10), Josephine (13), Klamath (20), Lake (5), Lane (130), Lincoln (1), Linn (11), Malheur (21), Marion (84), Morrow (1), Multnomah (376), Polk (20), Umatilla (20), Union (8), Wasco (8), Washington (127), and Yamhill (36).

Oregon’s 789th COVID-19 death is a 95-year-old man in Wasco County who tested positive on Oct. 25 and died on Nov. 16, in his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 790th COVID-19 death is a 30-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Nov. 8 and died on Nov. 13, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 791st COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Nov. 3 and died on Nov. 11, at Kaiser Sunnyside Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 792nd COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Nov. 13 and died on Nov. 17, at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 793rd COVID-19 death is a 40-year-old man in Malheur County who tested positive on Oct. 29 and died on Nov. 7, at West Valley Medical Center in Idaho. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 794th COVID-19 death is a 66-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Sept. 14 and died on Nov. 10, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 795th COVID-19 death is a 62-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 5 and died on Oct. 30, at Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 796th COVID-19 death is a 49-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Nov. 9 and died on Nov. 15, at Providence Medford Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 797th COVID-19 death is an 83-year-old man in Douglas County who tested positive on Nov. 3 and died on Nov. 18, at Mercy Medical Center in Roseburg. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 798th COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 16 and died on Nov. 18, at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 799th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Nov. 3 and died on Nov. 13, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 800th COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 5 and died on Nov. 11, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 801st COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 29 and died on Oct. 29. Place of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 802nd COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Nov. 9 and died on Nov. 11, in his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 803rd COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Nov. 9 and died on Nov. 16, in her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 804th COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Nov. 10 and died on Nov. 14, in his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 805th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Nov. 10 and died on Nov. 16, in her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 806th COVID019 death is a 77-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Nov. 6 and died on Nov. 18, in her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 807th COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old woman in Grant County who tested positive on Oct. 30 and died on Nov.15. Place of death and underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 808th COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Nov. 4 and died on Nov. 17, at Providence Medford Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Note: More information is available about Oregon’s 746th COVID-19 death, a 35-year-old man in Multnomah County. He had underlying conditions.

COVID-19 hospitalizations continue to rise

The number of hospitalized COVID-19 patients across Oregon increased to 414 today eight more than yesterday, marking a new record for the pandemic.

There are 96 COVID-19 patients in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) beds, two fewer than yesterday.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Below is a chart showing the trend of hospitalizations in Oregon.

Hospitalized COVID-19 positive patients by date

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



By:  Lt. Bryan Husband, Search and Rescue Coordinator

Assisted Skier:  Tindel Wells, 20 yom, Bend, OR

 

On 11/19/20, at about 9:00am, the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Search and Rescue Unit was advised by 9-1-1 dispatch of an injured backcountry skier, a little over 1/3 mile northwest of the Todd Lake TH.  The injured skier, later identified as , Tindel, Wells, was skiing with a partner in the steeper terrain surrounding the area, fell and suffered non-life threatening injuries, which were hindering him from returning to the Dutchman Flat parking lot on his own.

One DCSO SAR Deputy responded to the Dutchman Flat parking lot, while another DCSO SAR Deputy coordinated a DCSO SAR Volunteer response.  Six DCSO SAR Volunteers responded to the DCSO SAR base in Bend and gathered snowmobiles and medical supplies to complete the mission.  They then drove to the Dutchman Flat parking lot, responding the remainder of the way on snowmobiles.  Two addtional DCSO SAR Volunteers had been recreating near Moon Mountain and responded directly to the injured skiers location to assist. 

First arriving DCSO SAR Volunteers made contact with Wells at approximately 10:45am.  They were joined by Mt. Bachelor ski patrol staff and assisted Wells down to the Todd Lake TH, where they met with the remaining DCSO SAR Volunteers.  Wells was further stabilized and transported via snowmobile and snowbulance to the Dutchman Flat parking lot, where he was transferred to Bend Fire Department personnel at about 11:47am.  Wells was then transported to St. Charles hospital in Bend for further treatment.

DCSO SAR Volunteers arrived back at DCSO SAR base in Bend at 1:15pm.

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is a full service agency that oversees the adult jail, provides patrol, criminal investigations, civil process and search and rescue operations. Special units include SWAT, Street Crimes, Marine Patrol, ATV Patrol, Forest Patrol, along with six K9 teams. Founded in 1916 and today led by your duly elected Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office serves the nearly 190,000 residents in Deschutes County. The agency has 230 authorized and funded personnel, which includes 187 sworn employees who provide services to the 3,055 square miles of Deschutes County.



OSU to pilot smartphone-based COVID-19 exposure notifications system

 

This news release is available online: https://beav.es/oCD

 

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University is teaming up with the Oregon Health Authority to test a smartphone-based system that notifies users about possible exposure to COVID-19.

 

OSU faculty, staff and students can participate exclusively in the Oregon Exposure Notifications pilot program before it is available to cellphone users throughout Oregon. The system, which was developed by Google and Apple and uses the Bluetooth capability of smartphones, is already being tested or used in many other states, including California, Colorado, Washington and Virginia.

 

Use of the system is completely optional and users can turn it off or deactivate the app at any time. The system does not collect, track or store users’ location information or personal information.

 

“We appreciate the opportunity to collaborate with Oregon Health Authority to test this system at Oregon State. It is another important tool in our efforts to protect one another and to slow the spread of COVID-19 in our community,” said Steve Clark, vice president for university relations and marketing at OSU. “Our students, faculty and staff have demonstrated their commitment to public health efforts throughout the pandemic and their participating in this pilot program is another way they can make a positive impact.”

 

The exposure notifications system quickly alerts users when they may have been in close proximity, through day-to-day interactions, to someone who might have exposed them to COVID-19. The system does not replace traditional contact tracing efforts.

 

System users will receive confidential alerts if they were in contact for a sustained period of time with another participant who has tested positive for COVID-19. Participants also can quickly and anonymously alert other users if they test positive.

 

The Exposure Notifications system is embedded in Apple devices using iOS 13.7 or higher and requires an app for Android-based phones. The technology was designed to protect user privacy and no personal information is exchanged between users’ devices.

 

If a user receives an alert about potential exposure, they also will receive information about important health steps to take next. Participants in the Oregon State pilot program who receive an exposure notification will be invited to get a free follow-up COVID-19 test through TRACE-OSU, the university’s COVID-19 testing program.

 

Since the exposure notifications system became available to OSU students, faculty and staff earlier this month, nearly 5,000 people have installed it; about 3,800 using Apple iOS systems and about 1,000 using Android devices

 

The pilot program is expected to last four to six weeks. It is intended to help officials understand how the exposure notifications system can best support the health of Oregonians. If the system is found to be helpful for public health efforts, continued work toward statewide implementation is planned.

 

For more information about the pilot program, visit: https://beav.es/enx.  

 



The two-week freeze on business activity imposed by the Governor last week could have a much longer impact on the livelihood of the Bend business community.  CEO of the Bend Chamber of Commerce Katy Brooks says local restaurants are fighting an uphill battle.  Brooks says we could see repeat short term freezes on business activity throughout the winter.  She says that could ultimately force some businesses to close without continued patronage if they’re just barely making ends meet now because of the pandemic - especially restaurants because they buy food in advance and it goes to waste without customers.



PARKING FEE WAIVED AT OREGON STATE PARKS NOV. 27, THE DAY AFTER THANKSGIVING

 

News Release from Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept.
Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) invites Oregonians to head outside for some fresh air the day after Thanksgiving, Nov. 27, also known as ‘Green Friday.’ OPRD will waive day-use parking fees that day in 25 state parks across Oregon. 

“We recognize that being outdoors makes us feel better and is a break from the stresses of 2020,” said director Lisa Sumption. “In this unconventional year, we feel it is especially important to honor this tradition as thanks to Oregonians for supporting us through our toughest times.”

Thanksgiving weekend falls squarely within the Governor’s Two-Week Freeze, Nov. 18 – Dec. 2. Accordingly, OPRD directs people to limit gatherings at parks to six people and two households. This is in addition to longstanding direction to stay local, wear face coverings and maintain a 6’ distance from other visitors.

“Following these precautions is particularly important in the coming weeks to support statewide efforts to stop the spread of the virus,” Sumption said. “When visitors prepare and care, it keeps parks safe for everyone.”

Green Friday typically kicks off a series of holiday events in state parks, but this year OPRD opted to cancel these events. 

“The pandemic challenges all of us to find new, creative ways to celebrate the holidays,” Sumption said. “We look forward to the safe return of these holiday traditions, and until then, parks are open and here for you.”

The parking waiver applies from open to close Nov. 27 at the 25 parks that charge a $5 daily parking fee. A list of parks that require day-use parking permits is available at stateparks.oregon.gov. Parking is free year-round at the majority of Oregon’s 250-plus state park properties.  



Wyden, Merkley: Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs to Receive $350,000 Federal Grant

Transportation resources will fund purchase of two transit vehicles

Washington, D.C. – U.S. Sens. Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley today announced the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs will receive a $350,000 federal grant to buy two transit vehicles that will provide service to work, schools, health care and other services.

“The economic impact from COVID-19 has landed hard on Oregon’s tribes, making it more crucial than ever to continue investments that provide infrastructure support during this crisis and afterward,” Wyden said. “I’m glad the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs secured these federal transportation resources, and I’ll keep working on additional help with another key challenge facing this community -- dependable water infrastructure.”

“Good public transportation is critical to put within reach of families all kinds of essential resources they need to stay healthy and thrive, from grocery stores and pharmacies to schools and jobs,” said Merkley. “I’m pleased that this funding is headed to the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs to support the strengthening of the community’s transit fleet, and I will continue fighting for the resources, including water infrastructure investments and coronavirus support, to help tribal members not just get through these challenging times, but thrive.”

The $350,000 Federal Transit Administration grant from the U.S. Department of Transportation will help the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs to buy two transit vehicles that replace aging vehicles that are no longer useful.

A web version of this release is here.

 



REDMOND, OR -- An updated Executive Order from the governor and the Oregon Health Authority will impact K-12 indoor school sports.  The order took effect yesterday according to Sheila Miller at Redmond Schools and says it will last until December 2nd . She says the pause effects basketball, volleyball, swimming and wrestling. Miller says outdoor sports have to limit participants to 50 people and everyone must wear a mask and social distance at least 6 feet.  She says the limit on participants for outdoor sports has led to cancellation of this week’s 7-ON-7 football games.

 



REDMOND, OR -- The pandemic has spurred growth in smaller, rural cities and Redmond is a prime example in Central Oregon  City Manager Keith Witcosky says growth in the city is accelerating. He says they thought two people a day were moving to the city but new statistics form Portland State show more than 4 people a day moving to Redmond. He says building permits are up 15-to-20-per cent. Witcosky says in 2021 the main priority for the Redmond City Council will be how  to manage growth and how best to invest resources.



SANTIAM CANYON, OR -- A major cleanup along Highway 22 in the Santiam Canyon is continuing. ODOT’s Peter Murphy says the canyon was devastated by wildfires that destroyed homes and businesses in several communities. He says they have been removing thousands of hazardous trees over the last month and a half.  Murphy says the estimated cleanup cost is about 600-million dollars and will take about 18 months to complete the work. He says if you’re travelling Highway 22 it will be a slow-go with a speed limit of 40-miles an hour as well as the possibility of delays due to the clean-up effort blocking the highway from time to time.  



LA PINE OR -- Two people were killed, and two others were injured yesterday when a pickup truck a rental moving van on Highway 97 near La Pine.  Oregon State Police say a male juvenile, driving a Dodge pickup, side-swiped a Ford Explorer that was turning onto Jack Pine Loop. The pickup then entered the highway where it collided head-on with a U-Haul van driven by 35-year-old Jeffery Ferris of Fairview.  Ferris died at the scene as did the unidentified juvenile driver of the Dodge pickup. A passenger in each vehicle was taken to Saint Charles with injuries. The accident happened just before 1 p.m. and closed Highway 97 until 5 o’clock yesterday afternoon.



APPLY FOR FOOD, CASH AND OTHER ASSISTANCE FROM HOME DURING OREGON TWO-WEEK FREEZE

 

News Release from Oregon Department of Human Services
Posted on FlashAlert: November 18th, 2020 3:55 PM

(Salem, Ore.) – Starting on Nov. 18, Oregon will be in a statewide Two-Week Freeze to stop the rapid spread of COVID-19 across Oregon. Oregonians statewide are asked to stay home except for essential business.

All Oregonians can apply for food, cash and child care assistance provided through the Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS) from home without having to visit an office in person.

Visit govstatus.egov.com/or-dhs-benefits for information on how to apply for assistance using the ODHS online application, email, mail, telephone or application drop off.

Oregonians who need urgent and ongoing food assistance can visit needfood.oregon.gov.

Older adults or people with disabilities who need additional information about resources available to help can call 1-855-ORE-ADRC (1-855-673-2372) or visit www.adrcoforegon.org.

Information on how to apply for domestic violence assistance can also be found at govstatus.egov.com/or-dhs-benefits.

While many ODHS offices remain open to the public for essential business, we encourage members of the public to apply online, by email, by phone, or to call before coming in. In most cases, you don’t need to visit an office in person to get assistance.

For more ways to connect with ODHS or to find other types of assistance, contact 211info:



Weekly cases and hospitalizations at record highs

OHA’s COVID-19 weekly report released today set pandemic highs for daily cases and hospitalizations.

OHA reported 6,491 new daily cases during the week of Monday, Nov. 9 through Sunday, Nov. 15, a 25% increase over the previous record-high week.

The percentage of positive tests for COVD-19 increased to 12.5% from 11.9%, even with an increase in the number of people tested.

Weekly hospitalizations from COVID-19 rose to 291, the highest yet reported in the pandemic.

There were fewer deaths, 31, associated with COVID-19 than the previous week’s record high of 42.

People aged 20 to 49 accounted for 51% of the cases, while people 70 and older accounted for 75% of deaths.

Note: This week’s report includes a report on people with intellectual and developmental disabilities who have been diagnosed with COVID-19. This includes people living in congregate or residential settings.

To date, there have been 5 people with intellectual or developmental disabilities who have died from COVID-19 associated illness.

This total comes from matching client lists from the state’s Office of Developmental Service Disabilities and the COVID-19 database.

These reports will be published quarterly. More information can be found here





Deschutes Historical Museum Announces Release of Let There Be Light: A History of Bend’s Water Pageant 
 
(Bend) – The Deschutes County Historical Society announces the release of Let There Be Light: The History of Bend’s Water Pageant, a short film by Future Filmworks. Using the archives of the Deschutes Historical Museum and interviews with former pageant royalty and organizers, the film details the unique night-time parade of floats on Mirror Pond that married theater and historical pageantry. The film was funded through a generous gift from Cascade Heritage Foundation. 
 
Born out of a drive to increase commerce during The Great Depression, the event grew from humble beginnings in 1933 to an event that drew thousands of tourists to Drake Park through 1965. Thousands of volunteer hours were dedicated each year to the production of the event, known for its towering arch illuminated with colorful lights and the Queen’s Swan float. 
 
The film runs approximately 25 minutes and is available to stream online now through BendFilm’s Tin Pan Theater (www.tinpantheater.com). DVDs are available for sale through the museum’s website store (www.deschuteshistory.org); curbside pick-up is available. 
 
A sold-out premiere at The Tower Theatre scheduled for November 19 has been postponed until January following state COVID restrictions.  
 
For more information, call the museum at 541.389.1813 or email at info@deschuteshistory.org





LA PINE, OR --

November 18 19, 2019, 2 PM

 

La Pine firefighters respond to head on crash on Hwy 97, Rental moving van vs pickup truck

 

Wednesday , November 18 , 2019 at 12:50 pm.  La Pine Firefighter/paramedics were dispatched to a head on collision about a mile south of La Pine on Highway 97 near the Jack Pine Loop Road intersection. A pickup truck collided head and a rental moving van headed southbound collided head on. There are two confirmed fatalities and two patients transported to St. Charles Bend by fire-paramedics. Both vehicles caught on fire as a result of the collision. Highway 97 is currently closed for an undermined amount of time. OSP is doing the investigation and accident reconstruction with the assistance of DCSO. ODOT is handling traffic diversions and highway recovery as the road is currently not passable.  



Oregon reports 1,099 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 10 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed 10 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 788, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 1,099 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 59,669.

The new cases  are in the following counties: Baker (9), Benton(13), Clackamas (82), Clatsop (4), Columbia (6), Coos (5), Crook (6), Curry (3), Deschutes (40), Douglas (33), Gilliam (2), Grant (6), Harney (3), Hood River (11), Jackson (108), Jefferson (15), Josephine (20), Lake (8), Lane (115), Lincoln (5), Linn (30), Malheur (33), Marion (84), Morrow (2), Multnomah (210), Polk (9), Tillamook (4), Umatilla (29), Union (3), Wasco (4), Washington (171), and Yamhill (26).

Oregon’s 779th COVID-19 death is a 65-year-old woman in Yamhill County who tested positive on Nov. 12 and died on Nov. 14, at Willamette Valley Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 780th COVID0-19 death is a 75-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 11 and died on Nov. 15, at Legacy Mount Hood Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 781st COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old man who tested positive on Oct. 16 and died on Nov. 8, at OHSU. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 782nd COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old man in Douglas County who tested positive on Nov. 10 and died on Nov. 17. Place of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 783rd COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Sept. 20 and died on Nov. 15. Place of death is being confirmed. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 784th COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old man in Crook County who tested positive on Nov. 3 and died on Nov. 17. Place of death is being confirmed. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 785th COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Nov. 9 and died on Nov. 17. Place of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 786th COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Oct. 30 and died on Nov. 12, in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 787th COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Nov. 2 and died on Nov. 15, at Tuality Community Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 788th COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Oct. 22 and died on Nov.17, at McKenzie Willamette Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

COVID-19 hospitalizations continue to rise

The number of hospitalized COVID-19 patients across Oregon rose to 406 today, marking a new record for the pandemic. The largest increase was in Region 1, which includes the Portland metropolitan area, and in Region 2, which includes the Willamette Valley, and in Region 5, which encompasses Jackson and Josephine counties.

There are 94 COVID-19 patients in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) beds, two fewer than yesterday. More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.




DATE: November 18, 2020

Secretary of State Bev Clarno Releases Audit of Statewide Data Privacy and Incident Response

SALEM, OR — Oregon lacks a senior official responsible for managing data privacy, which increases the risk that private, personally identifiable information is not appropriately safeguarded, according to an audit released today by the Secretary of State. The findings are outlined in the report entitled: “The State Does Not Have A Privacy Program to Manage Enterprise Privacy Risk.”

State agencies collect and store personally identifiable information from virtually all Oregonians. This data includes health information, driving records, education data, and more. However, auditors found there is no statewide official charged with assessing the risks associated with processing that information and ensuring appropriate response strategies are in place.

As a result, the state has not established a privacy program to assess and respond to risk. The state has also not established guidance on incident response roles when security incidents arise that involve personally identifiable information.  

“Oregon has an ethical responsibility to safeguard the privacy of its citizens’ data,” said Secretary of State Bev Clarno. “It is important that a senior official is charged with ensuring risks to data privacy are understood and addressed throughout the state.”

Read the full audit on the Secretary of State website.

# # #

 

 


ODOT Alerts Motorists to Carry Chains/Traction Devices

 

Century Drive seeing greater use with recent snowfall

 

BEND – With the recent snowfall at and near Mt. Bachelor, winter sports enthusiasts are taking to Century Drive (OR372) in greater numbers.  Highway managers with the Oregon Department of Transportation want to make sure that those travelers are prepared for extreme driving conditions on the highway.  Plus, there’s a lot of demand for the use of sno-parks, which puts additional burden on our crews to maintain them. 

District Maintenance Manager Joel McCarroll wants to make sure that motorists are ready to tackle the snowy conditions on the highway.  “Even though the formal Mt. Bachelor ski season doesn’t kick off for a couple of weeks, we are seeing a greater demand on the highway as the early snowfall sets in.”  He adds that “ODOT is on the job plowing and sanding as necessary, but we want to be sure that winter sports enthusiasts are prepared for the conditions they’ll be driving in”. 

ODOT has staffed up for winter and is providing routine maintenance on Century Drive, which can see nose-to-tail traffic when winter sports season fully kicks in.

##ODOT##

 

Peter W. Murphy

Public Information Officer

ODOT Region 4



Governor Kate Brown Statement on November Revenue Forecast

 

(Salem, OR) — Governor Kate Brown today issued the following statement about the state’s November revenue forecast:

"Today’s forecast projects relatively stable state revenues," said Governor Brown. "While this provides some sense of relief in uncertain times, we know that the sacrifices Oregon's businesses are making right now to prevent the rapid community spread of COVID-19 will not be reflected until the next revenue forecast is released in January. 

"We continue to face uncertainty about Oregon's economy moving forward. What is abundantly clear, however, is that our state—like so many others across the country—needs another round of federal stimulus money. This is a worldwide public health crisis, and it demands a coordinated, national response. And we simply cannot wait until Congress convenes in January. 

"Our workers who are facing unemployment and the discontinuation of federal benefits programs at the end of the year—and employers who have had to close businesses for the betterment of public health—need help. And they need it right now.

"I am calling on Congress to put aside their partisan differences and deliver on a coronavirus relief package, including another round of Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation and an extension of the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program and the Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation program. There is no time to waste. We urgently need congressional action to provide direct help to local governments, businesses, and families so that we can all continue to provide critical services to Oregonians during this crisis. 

"In addition, this year's wildfires have burned over 4,000 homes and structures in communities across Oregon. The state faces significant costs as we work to remove debris and rebuild wildfire-impacted communities. We cannot recover from these fires alone—we will need substantial federal support.

"I remain committed to exploring additional state-level solutions to assist Oregonians and Oregon's businesses, especially those that have been hard hit by the pandemic, including the hospitality industry, small businesses, and women, Black, Indigenous, People of Color, and Tribal-owned and operated businesses.

"I also remain committed to making prudent financial decisions and to position our state to manage unforeseen economic challenges that may come our way."

 

###



Governor Kate Brown Announces $55 Million in Financial Assistance to Support Oregon Businesses

Funds will be allocated to counties to distribute to businesses that have been hard hit by COVID-19  
 

(Salem, OR) — Governor Kate Brown announced today that the state will commit $55 million in financial assistance to support Oregon businesses who have been impacted by COVID-19 restrictions. These funds will be allocated to counties to distribute to businesses who have been financially impacted, with a priority for the hospitality industry, businesses impacted by the freeze, small businesses, and women, Black, Indigenous, People of Color, and Tribal-owned businesses.

“Our iconic main street businesses have sacrificed too much already in this pandemic,” said Governor Brown. “While we have invested over $100 million in Oregon businesses so far, we must find additional resources to deploy quickly to help businesses that are suffering, particularly our small businesses and those owned by Black, Indigenous, Latino, Latina, Latinx, Asian, Pacific Islander, Native American, and Tribal members. I know that this is not enough. I remain committed to fighting for additional resources at the federal level, including a reauthorization of the important features of the CARES Act, like the Payroll Protection Program and an extension of unemployment insurance benefits.”

The $55 million in Coronavirus Relief Funds will be allocated to counties, with each county receiving a base of $500,000 plus a per capita allocation of the remainder of the funds. The counties will be responsible for deciding how businesses apply to receive funds and communicating the application process to businesses.

The Governor’s Office anticipates that funds will be distributed to counties within the next several weeks. Businesses who are interested in applying should contact their county for more information.

 

###



BEND, OR -- The Shepherd’s House is getting ready to open a Winter Shelter in Bend next Monday at 6-30 in the evening. Development director Dave Notari (no-tar-ee) says they’ll serve 70 women, children, families and singles with warm beds and hot food. Notari says it’s also important to offer people who are struggling, wrap around services…including on-site medical, mental health and counseling services. He says it will be a low barrier shelter that will operate through April.



BEND, OR -- Effective today most of the Deschutes County buildings will have limited public access until at least December 2nd. The county says it will provide services virtually and by phone. The limited access is due to the governor’s statewide two-week freeze. Knott Landfill and solid waste transfer stations will maintain existing hours and customers are asked to wear a mask and maintain social distancing. Updates will be posted on the county website, Deschutes dot org.

 



REDMOND, OR -- The Redmond School District is looking for people to serve on a Bond Oversight Committee, following voter approval of a 27-point-5-million dollar bond. Public Information Officer Sheila Miller says the committee will make sure the money is spent for projects the voters approved. She says they also review program performance and financial audits. Miller says they’ll also  inspect school facilities and review quarterly reports. She says they are looking for 7-to-11 people to work on the committee. To apply go to Redmond school bond dot org.  Applications due by 5pm December 12th.

 





 

 

 

 

     



Governor Kate Brown Issues Executive Order on the Temporary Freeze to Stop the Rapid Spread of COVID-19

The order outlines risk reduction measures, effective for two weeks beginning Nov. 18, in all Oregon counties 
 

(Salem, OR) — Governor Kate Brown today issued Executive Order 20-65 following last week's announcement of a statewide freeze to stop the rapid community spread of COVID-19 in Oregon. In light of increasing COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations, the order outlines necessary risk reduction measures designed to limit gatherings and curb human contact.

"I know Oregonians have made tremendous sacrifices throughout this pandemic and that these new, temporary restrictions may seem daunting," said Governor Brown. "But, we are at a breaking point. If we don't take further action, we risk continued alarming spikes in infections and hospitalizations, and we risk the lives of our neighbors and loved ones. 

"I also know that Oregonians come together in times of need, and we owe it to each other to take these measures seriously. It is up to all of us to work together to get this virus under control."

Executive Order 20-65 addresses the following in detail:

  • Limiting at-home and social gatherings, as well as faith institutions
  • Limiting the maximum capacity for grocery stores, pharmacies, and retail stores
  • Restricting food and drink establishments to take-out only
  • Requiring workplaces to mandate work-from-home as much as possible
  • Closing certain businesses, including gyms, museums, zoos, and indoor recreation facilities 


As with the Governor's previous executive orders related to COVID-19, all of the freeze measures are enforceable by law upon both individuals and businesses. However, the Governor is urging voluntary compliance. These measures to stop the spread of COVID-19 are a necessity to give Oregon a fighting chance to flatten the curve and save lives.  

Governor Brown added: "I expect local law enforcement to continue to use an education first approach, but Oregonians need to understand that these rules are enforceable under law. A large majority of Oregonians continue to do the right thing to protect themselves, their loved ones, and their neighbors. However, when Oregonians don’t take COVID-19 seriously, and don’t take steps to reduce the spread of the disease, they put all of us at risk. We need all Oregonians to use common sense, make smart choices, and take seriously their individual responsibilities during a public health emergency."

The full text of Executive Order 20-65 is available here.

Sector specific guidance is forthcoming and will be posted to the Governor's coronavirus webpage as it is available.  

 

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Oregon reports 935 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 13 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed 13 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 778, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 935 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 58,570.

The new cases are in the following counties: Baker (4), Benton (15), Clackamas (85), Clatsop (5), Columbia (7), Coos (5), Curry (4), Deschutes (30), Douglas (37), Harney (5), Hood River (4), Jackson (60), Jefferson (28), Josephine (2), Klamath (25), Lake (4), Lane (45), Lincoln (2), Linn (16), Malheur (7), Marion (151), Morrow (1), Multnomah (208), Polk (21), Tillamook (3), Umatilla (41), Union (6), Wallowa (1), Wasco (5), Washington (88), and Yamhill (20).

Oregon’s 766th COVID-19 death is a 63-year-old man in Umatilla County who tested positive on Oct. 29 and died on Nov. 8, at Trios Health Center in Washington. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 767th COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 7 and died on Nov. 16, in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 768th COVID-19 death is a 63-year-old man in Multnomah County who died on Nov. 9. The location of his tests and underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 769th COVID-19 death is a 70-year-old woman in Lane County who tested positive on Nov. 4 and died on Nov. 16, at McKenzie-Willamette Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 770th COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old woman in Linn County who tested positive on Sept. 14 and died on Oct.27, at Samaritan Albany General Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 771st COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Aug. 24 and died on Nov. 1, in his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.  

Oregon’s 772nd COVID-19 death is a 64-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Oct. 31 and died on Nov.15, in his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 773rd COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old woman in Douglas County who tested positive on Nov. 8 and died on Nov. 16, at Mercy Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 774th COVID-19 death is a 63-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Nov. 6 and died on Nov. 9, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 775th COVID-19 death is a 52-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Oct. 27 and died on Oct. 31, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 776th COVID-19 death is a 67-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Oct. 26 and died on Nov. 13, at Salem Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 777th COVID-19 death is a 98-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Oct. 13 and died on Nov. 8, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 778th COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 1 and died on Nov. 9, at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



BEND, OR  -- COCC is accepting applications from high school students who want to try to get a Merit Scholarship. Jenn Kovitz at the college says these scholarships are not based on financial need, they are based only on a student’s GPA, which is a minimum of 3-point-0. Kovitz says the merit scholarships are worth 700-dollars per term which would cover about half of the cost for a full time student taking 12 hours of classes. She says however students only need to take minimum 6 credit hours per term. Go to the COCC Financial Aid webpage for more information. March1st is the deadline to apply



BEND, OR -- Deschutes County Commissioner Patti Adair thinks the governor’s freeze order may close many restaurants for good. She asked County Health Officer Doctor Richard Fawcett if virus outbreaks are occurring at restaurants. He says “not huge outbreaks, but clusters.”  He says there aren’t many at all adding, one or two here and there. Commissioners are not happy with Governor Brown’s freeze order which they see as one size fits all in a state where virus cases and positive test rates vary widely. 



BEND, OR -- A correction to a story we reported this morning. Our report said that Cameron Fischer had been on the county commissioners agenda to be appointed to the Behavioral Health Advisory Board. Commissioners were told by board chair Patti Adair that Fischer was referred to apply to the board by her partner commissioner-elect Phil Chang. We reported Fischer was not appointed and that was in error. Commissioners voted 2-to-1 to appoint Fischer to the advisory board with Commissioner Phil Henderson voting no. Henderson said bhe wonders why no one in the mental health department knew of Fischers's relationship. KBND regrets the error. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



The Bend community outreach organization NeighborImpact is doling out $488 thousand dollars to Dechustes County homeowners who've suffered a negative financial impact resulting from Covid-19 if they qualify for mortgage assistance.  For qualifying guidelines and an application, go to neighborimpact.org/mortgage.



The Bend chapter of the American Cancer Society is still collecting pledges during it's Real Men Wear Pink fundraising campaign to support breast cancer research through Friday.  Their fundraising goal is $25K - they've alreaised $9K of that.  To donate, go to realmenwearpinkacs.org/centraloregon and support your favorite male wearing pink.  



Oregon reports 781 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 4 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed four more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 765, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 781 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 57,646.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (8), Benton (6), Clackamas (71), Columbia (5), Coos (4), Crook (1), Deschutes (35), Douglas (9), Hood River (3), Jackson (59), Jefferson (1), Josephine (2), Klamath (3), Lake (2), Lane (41), Linn (11), Malheur (5), Marion (103), Multnomah (231), Polk (16), Tillamook (2), Umatilla (10), Union (23), Wasco (1), Washington (118), and Yamhill (11).

Oregon’s 762nd COVID-19 death is a 41-year-old man in Washington County, who became symptomatic on Nov. 8 after contact with a confirmed case, and died on Nov. 15 in his residence. He did not have underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 763rd COVID-19 death is a 78-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Nov. 8 and died on Nov. 14. Place of death is being confirmed. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 764th COVID-19 death is a 60-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Nov. 2 and died on Nov. 15 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 765th COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 5 and died on Nov. 8 at Adventist Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: November 16, 2020

 

0.76% of Workplace Outbreaks from Restaurants

Statewide Industry Shutdown of Dining Rooms Does Not Add Up
 

Wilsonville, OR– On Friday, the Oregon Governor’s office announced wide ranging closures of all indoor and outdoor dining rooms across Oregon starting November 18. The announcement on November 13th came one day after a newly published report from the Oregon Health Authority identifying 2,893 Covid-19 cases associated with workplaces. Of those cases, 22 were tied to restaurants representing 0.76% of current workplace outbreaks.

“Our industry, along with the fitness industry, are the official targets of the latest directives from Governor Brown’s office,” said Jason Brandt, President & CEO of the Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association. “We desperately need an explanation, and we are not getting straight answers. If 0.76% of active workplace outbreaks represent a need to shut down an entire industry, we have a real time crisis in how we are making regulatory decisions as a state.”

The Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association (ORLA) has been an active partner in transforming thousands of hospitality environments to promote guest and employee safety. The industry continues to argue additional restrictions on controlled environments pushes virus spread to uncontrolled environments.

“We are running out of ways to express our deep concern about the correlation between dining room shutdowns and private behavior,” said Brandt. “If human interaction is going to take place during the course of the holiday season, then it is much more advantageous to have those interactions take place in controlled environments.”

The state association continues to advocate for necessary adjustments to restaurant dining room protocol. For example, Governor Brown’s November 13th press conference stated private gatherings should be limited to 2 households or a maximum of 6 people. ORLA is advocating the same exact standard be allowed immediately in dining rooms across the state.

“Why are we allowing 2 private households to gather with up to 6 people in an uncontrolled environment and closing dining rooms when those same interactions can take place in a controlled dining room environment with oversight from a third party?” said Brandt. “We stand ready to help in getting this state back on track as thousands of livelihoods are at stake.”

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The Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association is the leading business association for the foodservice and lodging industry in Oregon, which is comprised of approximately 10,000 foodservice locations and 2,000 lodging establishments with a workforce prior to COVID of 183,191.

 



Oregon reports 771 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 737, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 771 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 51,909.

The new cases are in the following counties: Baker (7), Benton (13), Clackamas (110), Clatsop (2), Columbia (3), Coos (8), Crook (9), Curry (1), Deschutes (30), Douglas (18), Grant (3), Harney (3), Hood River (2), Jackson (56), Jefferson (7), Josephine (3), Klamath (7), Lane (49), Lincoln (3), Linn (18), Malheur (15), Marion (90), Multnomah (151), Polk (15), Umatilla (23), Union (8), Wallowa (1), Wasco (2), Washington (95), and Yamhill (19).

Oregon’s 735th COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old man in Deschutes County who tested positive on Oct. 31 and died on Nov. 9, at St. Charles Medical Center Bend. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 736th COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Oct. 30 and died on Nov. 9, at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 737th COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Oct. 22 and died on Nov. 9, at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



                                                   

It is up to us all to reverse the rising number of COVID-19 cases in Deschutes County. St. Charles Hospital is filling up, case numbers are drastically increasing, and getting our children back to school is on the line. This is a serious community health threat, and I implore you to please take it seriously.
 
Thank you to the Bend-LaPine School Board for joining the Bend City Council and St. Charles Health in partnership to develop and execute a campaign focused on the 20-29 age demographic, which has been linked to a large number of recent cases. This campaign is being produced this week.  
 
There’s been a good deal of back and forth discussion recently about what Bend and Central Oregon could do next to curb the COVID-19 cases. 
 
I also understand that there is a cross agency group already at work developing a strategic plan for communicating around reducing COVID in Deschutes County for the next three months. I look forward to hearing more about this plan. 
 
We all recognize the pressing need to get our schools re-opened in Deschutes County. The huge surge in COVID-19 cases these days is especially worrisome, and reducing cases and staying off of the State of Oregon watch list must be a huge priority for us. 
 
On behalf of the Bend community, Council is committed to reducing Deschutes County COVID cases as much as possible. We know how important it is to make sure that the decisions Council does make are based on solid data from Deschutes County Health Department.  
 
Therefore, I have called an Emergency Bend City Council meeting this Thursday, November 9th at 12 noon.  Dr. George Conway and Nihad Sadr-Azod, Director and Deputy Director of  Deschutes County Health, will join the meeting to present the most current information they have for Deschutes County at this moment. I invite you all to watch the Bend City Council meeting. Link is here.
 
Certainly, whatever decisions we make individually or collectively, we want to be sure they are accurately informed, and accurately focused to be effective and the least damaging to the more fragile elements of our local economy. 
 
Meanwhile, the City is continuing to advocate to allow the State of Oregon to allocate CARES funding for ventilation projects, which I understand is a key component to complete in order for local schools to re-open. 
 
Please continue to be diligent about social distancing and mask wearing!

Take care and stay safe,
Sally

 



Blank SpacePress Release

Date: Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2020
Trump Administration Grants Gold Star Families and Military Veterans Free Entrance to National Parks, Refuges and Other Public Lands Starting Veterans Day

WASHINGTON, D.C. —?On behalf of the Trump Administration and in support of America’s military members and families, U.S. Secretary of the Interior David L. Bernhardt signed Secretary’s Order 3387 at the Iowa Gold Star Museum in October, announcing that Gold Star Families and U.S. military veterans will be granted free access to national parks, national wildlife refuges and other federal lands managed by the Department of the Interior?starting on Veterans Day (Nov. 11) this year and every day onward. 

“The Trump Administration is committed to honoring American patriots – the men and women who have served in our armed forces,”?said Secretary Bernhardt. “With the utmost respect and gratitude, we are granting veterans and Gold Star Families free access to the iconic and treasured lands they fought to protect starting this Veterans Day and every single day thereafter.” 

Entrance fees for the National Park Service, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s National Wildlife Refuge System, and standard amenity recreation fees for the Bureau of Land Management and the Bureau of Reclamation sites will be waived for veterans and Gold Star Families. They will have free access to approximately 2,000 public locations spread out across more than 400 million acres of public lands, which host activities to fit any lifestyle, from serene to high octane, including hiking, fishing, paddling, biking, hunting, stargazing and rock climbing. Additionally, lands and waters managed by the U.S. Forest Service and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers are participating in the program. 

Many Interior managed lands have direct connections to the American military, such as frontier forts, Cold War sites, battlefields, national cemeteries and memorials. These special places pay tribute to our veterans and serve as reminders of their courage and sacrifice throughout the history of our nation, from Minuteman National Historic Park where colonists stood in defense of their rights, to Yellowstone National Park, which was protected from vandalism and poaching by the 1st U.S. Cavalry before the National Park Service was established, to Mount Rushmore where modern warriors attend reenlistment ceremonies.? 

For purposes of this program, a veteran is identified as an individual who has served in the United States Armed Forces, including the National Guard and Reserves, and can present one of the following forms of identification: 

  • Department of Defense Identification Card
  • Veteran Health Identification Card (VHIC)
  • Veteran ID Card
  • Veterans designation on a state-issued U.S. driver’s license or identification card 

Gold Star Families are next of kin of a member of the United States Armed Forces who lost his or her life in a “qualifying situation,” such as a war, an international terrorist attack or a military operation outside of the United States while serving with the United States Armed Forces. 

The Interagency America the Beautiful National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Pass Program already includes a free annual pass for active-duty members of the U.S. Military and their dependents. Other free or discounted passes are available for persons with permanent disabilities, fourth-grade students, volunteers, and senior citizens age 62 years or older. 

Interior also offers fee-free entrance days for everyone throughout the year to mark days of celebration and commemoration including the birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr., National Public Lands Day, Veterans Day and the signing of the Great American Outdoors Act. 

 

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 

Dutch Bros Bend and Redmond celebrating Veteran's Day

Dutch Bros is donating proceeds to Honor Flights 

 

Honor Flight Network

 

BEND, Ore. (Nov. 10, 2020) – Dutch Bros Bend and Redmond are honoring Veteran’s Day by donating proceeds from sales on Nov. 11 to Honor Flights. All funds will go to Honor Flights’ veterans’ program. The organization transports veterans toWashington D.C. to visit memorials dedicated to those who sacrificed their lives. 

 

“We’re so excited to celebrate Veteran’s Day by donating to such a great cause,” said Josh Kimzey, operator of Dutch Bros Bend and Redmond. “I can’t begin to understand the sacrifice these men and women have given. We’re so honored to donate to such an amazing cause for the fifth year in a row.”

 

The Honor Flight Network is currently honoring veterans who served during World War II, the Korean War, in Vietnam and terminally ill veterans from any era of service.

 

When:  Wednesday, Nov. 11

 

Where: All Bend and Redmond locations

 

What:  Proceeds from sales donated to Honor Flights

 

 

About Dutch Bros 

Dutch Bros Coffee is the country’s largest privately held drive-thru coffee company, with more than 400 locations and 12,000 employees in nine states. The company is headquartered in Grants Pass, Oregon, where it was founded in 1992 by Dane and Travis Boersma. Dutch Bros serves specialty coffee, smoothies, freezes, teas, a private-label Dutch Bros Blue Rebel energy drink and nitrogen-infused cold brew coffee. Its rich, proprietary coffee blend is handcrafted from start to finish.

 

In addition to its mission of speed, quality and service, Dutch Bros is committed to giving back to the communities it serves. Through its Dutch Bros Foundation and local franchisees, Dutch Bros donates millions of dollars each year to causes across the country.

 

To learn more about Dutch Bros, visit www.dutchbros.com, like Dutch Bros Coffee on Facebook or follow @DutchBrosCoffee on Instagram 

 

 

 


SUNRIVER, OR --M A slow speed pursuit took place in Sunriver on Sunday night. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office Sgt. Jayson Janes says 41 year old Graham Harvey of Redmond led a slow speed pursuit along Cottonwood road. Sgt. Janes says after spike strips were deployed, they were able to successfully detain Harvey who was given a citation to later appear in court. Harvey was charged with multiple charges, including felony attempt to elude, possession of methamphetamine, and reckless driving and endangering.

 



REDMOND, OR -- The Deschutes County Fair and Expo had a good first quarter in the new fiscal year and Director Geoff Hinds told county commissioners the early days of the second quarter look positive. Hinds told commissioners projections for the 2nd quarter with winter coming in, are not as positive as for the first quarter. He says they are working to generate revenue while cutting expenses.



BEND, OR -- A 33-year-old street sweeper called Bend Police after being harassed by 30 year old Jonathan Paul of Bend. Lt. Juli McConkey says the caller had been working, sweeping Northwest Newport Avenue when Paul had driven by him slowly several times before pointing a handgun at the victim. Lt. McConkey says after locating Paul’s vehicle containing the weapon, they determined it to be a black metal airsoft gun. Paul was not taken to jail due to COVID regulations. He was cited and released for menacing.

 

 



BEND, OR -- Public Health Director Nahad Sadar-Azodi told Deschutes County Commissioners yesterday virus cases jumped by one-third to a high of 193 cases last week, beating the old record high of 149 set the week before last. Sadr-Azodi says hospitalizations are on the rise with 15 now at Saint Charles. He says more than half of the virus cases are people under age of 50. Sadr-Azodi says that’s likely due to either their work environment or, social gatherings without masks or social distancing.



BEND, OR -- Local veterans who suffer from service-related issues now have a specialized program. D-A John Hummel says the Veterans Intervention Strategy offers an opportunity to access treatment and resources for mental-health and substance abuse. Hummel says not to mistake this for a veteran’s treatment court. The program will help 20 vets who are given individualized plans and mentored by other vets during their recovery. The VIS is an inter-agency team involving the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office, the Central Oregon Vet Center, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, Deschutes County Community Justice, Deschutes Defenders, and Kollie Law.



Oregon reports 723 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 4 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed four more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 734, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 723 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 51,155.

The new cases are in the following counties: Baker (1), Benton (8), Clackamas (68), Clatsop (2), Columbia (4), Coos (6), Crook (2), Deschutes (25), Douglas (21), Grant (4), Jackson (41), Jefferson (5), Josephine (2), Klamath (10), Lane (36), Linn (17), Malheur (7), Marion (79), Morrow (1), Multnomah (204), Polk (16), Tillamook (2), Umatilla (11), Union (13), Wasco (1), Washington (119), and Yamhill (18).

Oregon’s 731st COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Oct. 17 and died on Nov. 7, at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center Riverbend. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 732nd COVID-19 death is a 79-year-old woman in Lane County who tested positive on Oct. 17 and died on Nov. 7, at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center Riverbend. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 733rd COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Oct. 30 and died on Nov. 8, at Salem Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 734th COVID-19 death is a 50-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Oct. 17 and died on Nov. 8, at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center Riverbend. He had underlying conditions.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response



Five simple steps that Deschutes County residents should take now ahead of Thanksgiving travel later this month   

REDMOND, Oregon - If you’re planning to fly during the Thanksgiving holiday period, here are some steps that you can take now, well ahead of Thanksgiving, to help ensure that you won’t be a turkey when you get to a Transportation Security Administration (TSA) security checkpoint at the airport.  Because TSA is well-aware that many people have not traveled in several months, here is what you need to do now to be prepared later.

Tip 1: Know what to expect when traveling during a global pandemic and don’t forget your mask TSA has implemented changes to the security screening process to reduce the potential for crosscontamination in the security checkpoint known as the “Stay Healthy. Stay Secure.” campaign. It focuses on modifications to procedures to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. Passengers can expect to see:  ? 

? TSA officers wearing masks and gloves at the checkpoint, and they may be wearing eye protection or clear plastic face shields.  

? Passengers wearing masks. Travelers will be asked to momentarily remove their masks to verify their identity. It never hurts to pack an extra mask or two for use during your air travels.

? Social distancing among travelers in the checkpoint line and among TSA officers.  

? Increased cleaning and disinfecting of frequently touched checkpoint surfaces and screening equipment, including bins. ? TSA officers changing gloves after each pat-down and at the request of any passenger.

? Ability to bring one liquid hand sanitizer container, up to 12 ounces per passenger, in carry-on luggage. Be prepared to remove it from the carry-on for special screening. 
 
Tip 2: Enroll in TSA PreCheck® now to expedite screening and reduce touchpoints. Travelers who are enrolled in TSA PreCheck don’t have to remove their shoes, belts, lightweight jackets, electronics or their bag of travel-size liquids and gels. Not only is that convenient, but during a pandemic, it reduces touchpoints since travelers will not need to remove those items. Now more than ever, TSA PreCheck is a valuable program for travelers. Redmond Municipal Airport is hosting a TSA PreCheck enrollment center today through Friday, Nov. 13. The hours are 9 a.m. to noon and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Appointments are encouraged, but walk-ins will be accommodated. If you enroll this week, you will likely be eligible for TSA PreCheck by Thanksgiving. Start the enrollment process at www.tsa.gov/precheck.

 

Tip 3: Know what foods you can bring with you before you commit to bringing that special dish to contribute to the Thanksgiving feast. We know that many passengers like to travel with special foods to contribute to the Thanksgiving meal with family or friends. But did you know that there are some special steps you need to take when bringing food through the security checkpoint? If you’re traveling with food in your carry-on bag, TSA recommends that you remove it and place it in a bin for screening because food items can trigger a security alarm. To reduce potential cross-contamination, we recommend that food items are placed in a clear plastic bag. Upon entering the checkpoint, remove that clear bag with food and place it into the bin.  Not all foods can be transported in carry-on luggage. Follow this simple rule to ensure your food can travel with you: If you can spill it, spread it, spray it, pump it or pour it, pack it in a checked bag. For example, cranberry sauce, gravy and wine in quantities larger than 100 ml or 3.4 ounces should go in a checked bag. Cakes, pies and casseroles can travel in carry-on luggage.  

 

Tip 4: Don’t wait: download the free myTSA app now. The free, downloadable myTSA app is a traveler’s best friend and a trusty source for last-minute travel questions. The myTSA app provides airline passengers with 24/7 access to the most frequently requested airport security information. Save time and money with our helpful tips for preparing for security, including a searchable “Can I Bring” database All you need to do is type in the name of an item and the app will let you know if you should pack it in your checked or carry-on bag.  Other features of the app include keeping you up-to-date on flight delays or letting you know where the TSA PreCheck lanes are at an airport or terminal. The app is available from the App Store or Google Play.  
 

Tip 5: Follow TSA on Twitter to get tips and answers to your last minute questions. If you’re unsure whether an item should go in a carry-on bag or you have any other last-minute questions, send them to @AskTSA on Twitter or Facebook Messenger. Follow @TSA on Twitter to learn some helpful travel tips that are posted regularly so you can be the savvy traveler this Thanksgiving travel season. 
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The Transportation Security Administration was created to strengthen the security of the nation’s transportation systems and ensure the freedom of movement for people and commerce. 



BEND, OR -- For your businesses, Bend Fire and Rescue would like to remind all building owners and personnel to take actions to prevent fire sprinkler systems from freezing. Deputy Fire Marshal Cindy Kettering says their department responds to several fire sprinkler activations due to broken frozen pipes every year. Kettering says you can keep the pipes operative by heating or insulating the area.

 



BEND, OR -- The Deschutes County Commissioners meet at 9-this morning and the agenda includes a report on the Fair and Expo from Director Jeff Hinds. Commissioners will be asked to approve a grant application for a Quick Deploy Shelter. They will also hear from public health officials about the rising number of COVID-19 cases in Deschutes county. Commissioners will also discuss a plan by Bio Carbon Solutions, to take all incoming waste at the Negus Transfer Station. The company would remove metal, glass and non-carbon materials and take what’s left over, and turn that waste into liquid fuel products.

 

 

 



Former State Senator Cliff Bentz won the race for Oregon’s 2nd Congressional District and is getting ready to move to Washington. KBND asked Bentz if Greg Walden has been helping him make the transition. Bentz says Walden has introduced him to House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy and other GOP leaders. He says Walden has discussed committee assignments with him and helped him with a post-election fundraiser. Bentz says he would like to serve on the Natural Resources Committee as well as Transportation and Infrastructure, Agriculture and the Judiciary Committee.



Oregon State Police report a California woman died in a crash on Highway 97 between Gilchrist and Crescent yesterday morning.  Preliminary investigation revealed about 9:40 Sunday morning a Toyota Tacoma pickup driven by a 35-year-old man from Washington lost traction on the icy highway and slid into the oncoming lane where it collided with a Toyota Tundra. 63-year-old Cheryl Frank of Redding, California was a passenger in the Tundra. She sustained fatal injuries.

 



Governor Kate Brown Announces Two-Week Pause on Social Activities to Help Stop Rapid Spread of COVID-19

Measures take effect Nov. 11 in Malheur, Marion, Multnomah, Jackson, and Umatilla Counties, with five additional counties close to triggering these measures
 

(Portland, OR) — Governor Kate Brown today announced new measures pausing social activities to help stop the rapid spread of COVID-19 in counties where community transmission is on the rise. These pause measures will be in effect for two weeks, from Nov. 11 through Nov. 25, for Malheur, Marion, Multnomah, Jackson, and Umatilla Counties. Based on increasing statewide case counts, as well as increased sporadic case rates in these five counties, the new public health measures to reduce spread are an effort to save lives in Oregon.

Five additional counties––Washington, Baker, Union, Clackamas, and Linn––are close to the COVID-19 thresholds that would necessitate adding them to the Two-Week Pause. The Oregon Health Authority will examine their COVID-19 metrics on Monday to determine if those counties qualify.

“It is alarming that recent high case rates are not linked to any specific outbreaks, but rather reflective of sporadic community spread,” said Governor Brown. “We are seeing in real time how this virus can quickly snowball out of control. This Two-Week Pause is a series of measures and recommendations intended to curb human contact — both through reducing the amount of people we interact with, and the frequency of those encounters. We must stop this virus from spreading. We must preserve our hospital capacity. And we must save lives.”

The Two-Week Pause measures include:

  • Urging all businesses to mandate work from home to the greatest extent possible.
  • Pausing long-term care facility visits that take place indoors to protect staff and residents.
  • Reducing maximum restaurant capacity to 50 people (including customers and staff) for indoor dining, with a maximum party size of six. Continuing to encourage outdoor dining and take out.
  • Reducing the maximum capacity of other indoor activities to 50 people (includes gyms, fitness organizations/studios, bowling alleys, ice rinks, indoor sports, pools, and museums).
  • Limiting social gatherings to your household, or no more than six people if the gathering includes those from outside your household, reducing the frequency of those social gatherings (significantly in a two-week period), and keeping the same six people in your social gathering circle. 


Governor Brown added: “I am also calling on Congress to pass another COVID-19 relief package immediately when they return to DC—including another $600 weekly benefit in enhanced Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation—due to the increase of COVID-19 cases and the need for rollbacks both here in Oregon and nationwide.”

The Two-Week Pause is being instituted in counties with a case rate above 200 per 100,000 people over a two-week period, or more than 60 cases over a two-week period for counties with less than 30,000 people. These measures replace the County Watch List process that Governor Brown instituted in July.

Governor Brown's full remarks are available here.

A link to Governor Brown's press conference is available here.
 



Oregon reports 770 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 6 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed six more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 716, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 770 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 48,608.

The new cases are in the following counties: Baker (4), Benton (17), Clackamas (13), Clatsop (5), Columbia (5), Coos (6), Crook (5), Curry (6), Deschutes (38), Douglas (13), Grant (7), Harney (5), Hood River (1), Jackson (83), Jefferson (7), Josephine (5), Klamath (5), Lake (1), Lane (40), Lincoln (3), Linn 10), Malheur (16), Marion (77), Morrow (4), Multnomah (199), Polk (15), Umatilla (37), Union (8), Washington (120), and Yamhill (15).

Oregon’s 711th COVID-19 death is a 97-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 3 and died on Nov. 3, at Providence St Vincent Medical Center. The presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 712th COVID-19 death is a 59-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 4 and died on Nov. 4, at Adventist Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 713th COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 4 and died on Nov. 4, at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 714th COVID-19 death is a 95-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Oct. 22 and died on Nov. 4, at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 715th COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old woman in Wasco County who tested positive on Sept. 18 and died on Nov. 1, at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 716th COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old man in Washington County who became symptomatic on Oct. 9 after close contact with a confirmed case and died on Nov. 4, at Providence St Vincent Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



PRINEVILLE, OR -- On November 5, 2020, the Central Oregon Major Incident Team was activated in Crook County to investigate an incident involving the Central Oregon Emergency Response Team (CERT). CERT officers discharged weapons during a high-risk traffic stop.  CERT executed the traffic stop based upon information that Donald Matthew Freauff (Age 25, Redmond) was in Crook County with an outstanding parole warrant.

 

During the high-risk traffic stop, Freauff sustained non-life threatening injuries and was transported to St. Charles-Prineville. After receiving medical treatment, Freauff was discharged and lodged at the Crook County Jail last night with new criminal charges. Freauff has been charged with Felon in Possession of a Firearm, Fleeing/Attempting to Elude a Police Officer, Recklessly Endangering Another Person and Reckless Driving. Additional charges are expected as the investigation continues. Grand Jury proceedings are scheduled for next week.

 

In accordance with Senate Bill 111, the involved officers will be placed on administrative leave pending the results of the investigation. Further information will be released as the investigation continues.

 

 

Wade L. Whiting

District Attorney

Crook County District Attorney’s Office

300 NE Third Street

Prineville, OR 97754



Motorists reminded of reduced speed limit on OR 22 in Santiam Canyon

Numerous work zones remain after wildfire damage

SALEM—Motorists traveling on OR 22 through the Santiam Canyon are reminded that speeds have been reduced to 40 miles per hour between Gates (milepost 33) and Pamelia Creek Road (milepost 63). There have been numerous reports and complaints of excessive speeding through the burn area.

“This poor driving behavior is both risky and dangerous as many workers continue to aid these communities that are in recovery,” said Sgt. Jeremy Landers of the Marion County Sheriff’s Department. “We are urging travelers to be cautious and safe by obeying the speed limits in the Canyon.”

Significant work continues along OR 22 where wildfires in early September severely impacted communities in the Santiam Canyon. There are still numerous work zones including utility companies repairing power lines and crews are repairing guardrail, clearing debris, trees and other hazards.

In addition to the ongoing work zones, hazards to travelers include damaged and destroyed guardrail, roadside log decks and slash piles from hazard tree removal, as well as the potential for erosion and falling rocks. With fall and winter rains beginning, slides and debris flows are a particular concern especially in areas where the vegetation, tree roots and underbrush have been stripped away.

Travelers are urged to obey the posted speed limits and use extreme caution while traveling through the burn area.

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Coronavirus Update nameplate

November 5, 2020

#MyORHealth horizontal rule

In-person indoor gatherings driving spread of COVID-19 and record cases

Today, we reported 805 new COVID-19 cases in Oregon; sadly, this is another record daily case count.

The cause of today’s cases is still under investigation, but data from recent weeks continues to show that increased spread is due to small informal gatherings rather than large workplace or other outbreaks, according to Dean Sidelinger, state health officer at OHA. Sporadic cases – those not traced to a source – are also increasing. The percentage of positive tests is also rising, up to 8.5% last week.

“COVID-19 is spreading in Oregon at an unprecedented rate, driven in no small measure by in-person, indoor social gatherings. You are most likely to get COVID-19 from your family and friends,” said Governor Kate Brown. “Let me be clear: We cannot allow this disease to continue to spread so rapidly in our communities. Lives are at stake. Oregonians have made tremendous sacrifices to help each other throughout this pandemic, which is why Oregon has done relatively better than many other states at containing COVID-19. We can’t let up now. I will take further action to stop the spread of COVID-19, and I need Oregonians to continue to do their part as well.”

“Today’s high case count, combined with recent high counts, continue to show that COVID-19 is spreading more rapidly in Oregon than we had hoped,” Sidelinger said. “All this data leads us to conclude that Oregonians are circulating more in their communities. They are letting their guard down – and doing so as the weather turns colder. They are also spending more time indoors. Our tools to manage such spread rely on Oregonians getting more strict with themselves: not gathering or attending parties of any kind, wearing face coverings when outside the household, and physically distancing at all times.” 

#MyORHealth horizontal rule

Making your holiday to-do list? Check off one thing now: Get a flu shot

The flu vaccine can take up to two weeks to become effective, so no matter what you have planned for Thanksgiving this year, get your flu shot now.

“Getting a flu vaccine is an easy way people can protect themselves and their loved ones and help reduce the spread of flu this fall and winter,” said Paul Cieslak, M.D., public health physician at the Oregon Health Authority (OHA).

Flu vaccines are safe and effective but will not protect against COVID-19. “We need to lessen the dual threat of flu and COVID-19 spreading at the same time,” Cieslak said. A “twindemic” of two potentially fatal viruses circulating at the same time could burden the state’s health care system and result in many illnesses, hospitalizations and deaths.

OHA recommends everyone 6 months and older get a flu shot. Flu vaccine is available from health care providers, local health departments and many pharmacies. The vaccine is free or low cost with most health insurance plans. To find a flu vaccine clinic, visit www.flu.oregon.gov and use OHA’s flu vaccine locator tool.

Check out this infographic about flu shots and share it with your friends and family on your Facebook and Instagram accounts.

Don't wait to vaccinate everyone 6 months and older should get a flu shot



BEND, OR -- That 12-inch water main break Wednesday morning in Bend was repaired and streets nearby were reopened yesterday afternoon. The break closed Northeast 1st and 2nd and Olney Avenue. The Field Operations Manager for the Public Works Department, Troy Beck, says the 45-to-50 year-old pipe was placed on rock when it was installed. He says over time the rock acts like a fulcrum and the pipe become fatigued and fails.  Beck says the estimated the loss of water from the break was between 500 thousand to 750-thousand gallons of water. 

 

 



BEND, OR -- Democrat Jason Kropf defeated Representative Cheri Helt for Bend’s House seat by a wide margin. Now that the election is over, he wants to focus on working to lower the virus infection rate. Kropf believes everybody deserves to have affordable health care, especially now. He wants to do all he can to make sure the people of Bend are safe and healthy. Kropf believes that starts with making sure those healthcare providers and our frontline workers are protected.

 



BEND, OR -- Bend Heroes Foundation has received commitments of both land and financial help from Deschutes county and the City of Bend to build and operate Veterans Village. Foundation President Erik Tobiason says the village will house 15 and provide meals and services, from mental health to drug and alcohol counseling to VA benefits. He says some neighbors early on did voice concerns, but he noted there are strict guidelines veterans must agree to, to remain in the program. Tobiason says they are partnering with Central Oregon Veterans Outreach and providing case managers for every veteran to help them get into permanent housing.



REDMOND, 0R -- Earlier this week we reported that an 8-year-old Redmond girl suffered a gunshot wound at her home on Monday. We now learn from Redmond Police the child was shot by a sibling who found an unsecured, loaded firearm in the home. Police cited the firearm owner, 40-year-old John Wheeldon for Child Neglect and Reckless Endangering. Redmond Police and Child Protective Services are investigating the incident and will forward their report to the D-A. The child has since recovered. 

 



BEND, OR -- The voters of Bend elected new members on the City Council. Mayor Sally Russell says she thinks it’s a reflection of the changes throughout our community. She states that we seem to be leaning a totally different direction than city council has leaned in years past. Russell says she believes the council has shared goals and solid values that everyone can agree are important for Bend.
 



Oregon reports 805 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 5 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed five more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 710, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 805 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 47,839.

“COVID-19 is spreading in Oregon at an unprecedented rate, driven in no small measure by in-person, indoor social gatherings. You are most likely to get COVID-19 from your family and friends,” said Governor Kate Brown. “Let me be clear: we cannot allow this disease to continue to spread so rapidly in our communities. Lives are at stake. Oregonians have made tremendous sacrifices to help each other throughout this pandemic, which is why Oregon has done relatively better than many other states at containing COVID-19. We can’t let up now. I will take further action to stop the spread of COVID-19, and I need Oregonians to continue to do their part as well.”

Governor Brown, State Health Officer Dean Sidelinger and Rachael Banks, Public Health Director at OHA, will speak to the media at a press conference tomorrow, Friday, Nov. 6. Time and more details to come.

“Today’s high case count, combined with recent high counts, continue to show that COVID-19 is spreading more rapidly in Oregon than we had hoped,” said Dean Sidelinger, state health officer at OHA.

“Our data on the cases reported today is incomplete, as the case investigations are in process. But the case data from the past several days and weeks continue to show that the increased spread is driven through small informal gatherings and not due to large workplace or other outbreaks. Oregon’s sporadic cases, those not traced to a source, are also increasing. The percentage of tests that come back positive are rising – up to 8.5% last week. All this data leads us to conclude that Oregonians are circulating more in their communities and letting their guard down more and doing so as the weather turns colder, and they are spending more time indoors. Our tools to manage such spread rely on Oregonians getting more strict with themselves: not gathering or attending parties of any kind, wearing face coverings when outside the household, and physically distancing at all times.”  

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (13), Benton (7), Clackamas (71), Clatsop (1), Columbia (7), Coos (2), Crook (4), Deschutes (45), Douglas (10), Grant (5), Hood River (2), Jackson (67), Jefferson (4), Josephine (9), Klamath (1), Lane (37), Lincoln (1), Linn (24), Malheur (18), Marion (79), Morrow (3), Multnomah (196), Polk (8), Umatilla (26), Union (7), Wallowa (1), Wasco (6), Washington (134), and Yamhill (17).

Oregon’s 706th COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Nov. 2 and died on Nov. 3 at Providence Portland Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 707th COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 14 and died on Nov. 2 at Legacy Mt. Hood Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 708th COVID-19 death is a 62-year-old woman in Douglas County who tested positive on Oct. 14 and died on Nov. 4 at Mercy Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 709th COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old woman in Douglas County who tested positive on Oct. 8 and died on Nov. 4 at Mercy Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 710th COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old man in Crook County who tested positive on Oct. 29 and died on Oct. 17 in his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



BEND, OR -- Megan Perkins took a run for the Bend City Council Position 3 and she defeated incumbent Chris Piper. Perkins says she wants the City of Bend to lead when it comes to COVID-19 by reaching out to communities hard hit by the virus. Perkins says big challenges facing Bend include affordable housing and affordable and available childcare. She says Central Oregon is a childcare desert and the council needs to aggressively work with developers and community leaders to help resolve the problem. Perkins also says she is very happy voters approved the transportation bond.



Covid-19 has meant adjustments for the Oregon Ducks, who play their home opener against Stanford this weekend in Eugene. Head coach Mario Cristobal says Covid precautions, like showing up early, gives players time to warm up – and that prevents injuries. Cristobal says the bad part is not being able to put in camp hours. He says players also need to bring their enthusiasm and energy to supplement the fake crowd noise they will be using. Saturday’s game is at Autzen Stadium and will be broadcast live on KBND Radio, 100.1 FM and 1110 AM with the pre-game show at 2:30 p.m. and kickoff at 4:30 p.m.



REDMOND, OR -- Redmond voters have approved the passage of the district’s $27,500,000 bond measure. Superintendent Dr. Charan Cline says this critical bond will help preserve school facilities. Cline says the district will announce details of the Citizen Oversight Committee in the coming weeks and begin accepting applications. The citizen-led committee will oversee the use of the bond funds which is estimated to be issued early next year.



BEND, OR -- Democrat Phil Chang won his first campaign for public office, winning Position 2 on the Deschutes County Board of Commissioners. He defeated incumbent Republican Phil Henderson. Chang told KBND news he learned the county plays an important role as a public health authority and its importance as a health service provider. He says while the county has done a lot to deal with COVID-19 he says more needs to be done. Chang says after he takes office he will ask the Board of Commissioners to send voters a ballot measure to make commissioner positions non-partisan.



Oregon reports 597 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 4 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed four more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 705, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 597 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 47,049.

The new cases  are in the following counties: Baker (7), Benton (2), Clackamas (54), Clatsop (4), Columbia (5), Coos (2), Crook (9), Deschutes (17), Douglas (12), Grant (2), Harney (1), Hood River (2), Jackson (52), Jefferson (5), Josephine (1), Klamath (3), Lake (1), Lane (24), Linn (11), Malheur (11), Marion (83), Morrow (2), Multnomah (172), Polk (13), Tillamook (2), Umatilla (23), Union (3), Wallowa (3), Wasco (1), Washington (57), and Yamhill (13).

Oregon’s 702nd COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Oct.13 and died on Nov. 2, at OHSU. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 703rd COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Oct. 28 and died on Nov. 2, at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 704th COVID-19 death is a 98-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Oct. 6 and died on Nov. 2, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 705th COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Oct. 27 and died on Nov. 2, at Providence Medford Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

COVID-19 outbreak at Fred Meyer Distribution Center

An COVID-19 outbreak of 39 cases has been reported at the Fred Meyer Distribution Center in Clackamas County. The case count includes all persons linked to the outbreak, which may include household members and other close contacts to an employee. 

The outbreak investigation started on Oct. 22, but the initial case count was below the reporting threshold. State and county public health officials are working with the company to address the outbreak and protect the health of workers.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



BEND, OR -- Voters have elected two challengers to replace incumbents on the Bend City Council. Melanie Kebler picked up more than 60-per cent of the vote to defeat Justin Livingston who received 39-per cent of the vote for council position 1.

Challenger Megan Perkins defeated incumbent Chris Piper 52-per cent to 39-per cent for council position 3.. Anthony Broadman easily beat August Paul Johnson for council position 2 and for council position 4, Rita Schenkelberg defeated Michael Hughes 57-per cent to 32-per cent.
 



MADRAS, OR -- A three vehicle wreck yesterday afternoon on Highway 26 north of Madras claimed the life of a man. Oregon State Police say 71 year old Bonnie McCoy of Milwaukie was westbound and tried to pass a vehicle towing a trailer driven by 65 year old Deborah Dunne of North Plains. McCoy collided with an eastbound vehicle driven by 26 year old Ryan Gile of Vancouver, Washington. McCoy and her passenger, 71 year old Barry Barber of Milwaukie were airlifted to Saint Charles Bend.



BEND, OR -- A Bend man is jailed after police received information he was trying to communicate with underage females for sex. Police used a fictitious profile of a 17 year old girl when 62 year old Max McCurdy Junior made contact over social media and asked to meet her. At about 1:17 Tuesday morning Bend police saw McCurdy walking near Harvard Place and Princeton Loop where he was taken into custody. Police say McCurdy had methamphetamine with him when arrested. He is jailed on charges of First Degree Online Sexual Corruption of a Child and drug charges.

 



Voters in Bend have approved a 190-million dollar Transportation Bond and also said yes to the Deschutes Library Bond of 195-million dollars to renovate and upgrade libraries. Voters also said no when asked if Deschutes county should license marijuana facilities by a 57-point-9-per cent to yes votes at just over 42-per cent. Redmond voters also approved a school bond measure of more than 27-million dollars to build classrooms and update aging buildings by a 58-per cent to 41-per cent margin. 

 

 



Democrat Jason Kropf has defeated Republican incumbent Cheri Helt in the 54th House District. Republican State Senator Tim Knopp defeated Democrat Eileen Keilly in the race for State Senate District 27th. In the race for County Commissioner Democrat Phil Chang beat incumbent Phil Henderson 52-per cent to 47-per cent. Sheriff Shane Nelson has thanked his supporters as he picked up almost 57-per cent of the vote to beat challenger Scott Schaier with just under 44-per cent.  Redmond voters reelected Mayor George Endicott who beat two challengers with more than 53-per cent of the vote.    

 



Today is Election Day and remember postmarks do not count. Drop your ballot off at the county clerk’s office or at a ballot box before 8-o’clock tonight or it won’t count. Deschutes county voters will decide whether to allow additional marijuana producers and processors. Redmond voters will decide a 27-point-5-million-dollar school bond to repair and upgrade buildings. Bend voters will vote on a 190-million-dollar transportation bond, and a 195-million dollar bond for the Deschutes Public Library District. Voter turnout in Deschutes county was more than 71-per cent as of Monday.

 



PRINEVILLE, OR -- A 23-year-old Prineville woman is dead following an ATV wreck Sunday afternoon. The Crook County Sheriff says the woman was on a phone with a person out of state when she did not respond. The out of state party contacted the sheriff’s office and they sent a deputy to an area near Northeast Puckett Road. They found a Honda four wheeler half submerged in an irrigation canal on private land and found the woman dead at the scene. Police say alcohol was a factor. The victim has not been identified.



Yesterday a Bend man was lodged in the Deschutes County Jail on ten counts of Encouraging Child Sexual Abuse. 51-year-old Brad Well had been identified after for several months of investigation following a tip from the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children and the Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force. The tip specifically identified one child pornography image that was accessed by an individual within the City of Bend around the first of the year.  In April Well’s was served with a search warrant at work and at his home.  Multiple digital devices were seized. Further examination of those devices revealed numerous images of child pornography which led to Wells arrest yesterday.



REDMOND, OR -- Redmond Police received a call yesterday afternoon about an 8 year old child injured in her home. Police went to the 23-hundred block of Southwest 20th Court after a 9-1-1 caller found the injured child. Redmond Fire transported the child to Saint Charles Bend but the extent of the injury was not available. The injury was the result of a firearm in the home. The investigation is continuing. Redmond Police say there is no risk to the public.

 



Oregon reports 495 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 9 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed nine more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 701, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 495 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 46,460.

The new cases are in the following counties: Baker (8), Benton (9), Clackamas (56), Clatsop (8), Columbia (4), Coos (1), Deschutes (12), Douglas (10), Grant (4), Hood River (1), Jackson (70), Jefferson (1), Josephine (3), Klamath (7), Lane (26), Linn (21), Malheur (16), Marion (64), Morrow (1), Multnomah (61), Polk (13), Sherman (2), Tillamook (2), Umatilla (16), Union (8), Wallowa (2), Wasco (1), Washington (57), and Yamhill (11).

Oregon’s 693rd COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Oct. 28 and died on Oct. 29, in her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 694th COVID-19 death is a 63-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on Oct. 5 and died on Oct. 30 at Providence Portland Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 695th COVID-19 death is a 78-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 20 and died on Nov. 2 at Providence Portland Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 696th COVID-19 death is a 95-year-old woman in Marion County who became symptomatic on Oct. 21 after close contact with a confirmed case and died on Nov. 1, in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 697th COVID-19 death is a 47-year-old woman in Jefferson County who tested positive on Aug. 5 and died on Oct. 30, in her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 698th COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 25 and died on Oct. 29. Place of death is being confirmed. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 699th COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old man in Josephine County who tested positive on Sept. 28 and died on Oct. 29, at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center in Grants Pass, Oregon. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 700th COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on Oct. 21 and died on Oct. 31, at Providence Portland Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 701st COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive Oct. 11 and died on Nov. 1, at Providence Portland Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



Walden Applauds Official Signing of Critical Fix to Help Klamath Irrigators 

Provides Basin irrigators access to up to $10 million in emergency drought relief 

WASHINGTON, D.C.  -- Representative Greg Walden (R-OR) ?applauded President Trump signing into law a critically needed fix to the 2018? Water Resources Development Act (WRDA)? that would?provide relief to Klamath Basin irrigators who have been hard-hit by drought. The legislation was passed by the House on October 1, and was signed into law on Friday, October 30, 2020. 

In 2018, the WRDA included language that was essential for irrigators in the Klamath Basin to effectively use $10 million in drought relief funds that the lawmakers had previously secured. This new law provides clear flexibility in how the relief may be used, enabling irrigators to access the funding when there is a severe shortage of water. 

"This is welcome news for irrigators in the Klamath Basin, who are enduring another drought-stricken year, unprecedented wildfires, and the COVID-19 pandemic all at the same time,” said Walden. “This legislation will ensure they have the tools they need to get through these hard times as well as prepare irrigators in the Klamath Basin if they are hit with severe drought in the years ahead. I want to thank President Trump for swiftly signing this bill into law and taking care of the hardworking farmers and ranchers in the Klamath Basin.” 

The original language authorized up to $10 million a year for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation to work with the farming and ranching community to develop and implement strategies to align water demand with available supply. This technical correction clarifies the authority for?irrigators to access the funds for strategies such as land idling and groundwater pumping in times of drought.? 

This announcement comes a few months after Walden brought? Secretary of Interior David Bernhardt?and Commissioner of Reclamation Brenda Burman to meet with key stakeholders in the Klamath Basin. Earlier this year, the Trump Administration made good on an April commitment to?deliver?140,000 acre feet of water for farmers in the Klamath Basin.? 

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WALDEN.HOUSE.GOV



Oregon reports 557 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 692, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 557 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the statewide total to 45,978.

The new cases  are in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (93), Clatsop (3), Columbia (1), Coos (1), Crook (2), Curry (4), Deschutes (30), Douglas (6), Jackson (17), Jefferson (1), Klamath (1), Lake (1), Lane (12), Lincoln (1), Linn (11), Malheur (7), Marion (60), Multnomah (199), Polk (11), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (13), Union (1), Wasco (5), Washington (71), and Yamhill (4).

Oregon’s 692nd COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct.24 and died on Oct.25, in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

OHA Updates Pediatric COVID-19 Data

OHA has updated a report analyzing the scope of pediatric COVID-19 cases in Oregon since the beginning of the pandemic. Of confirmed and presumptive cases in Oregon, 4,901 – 11.3 percent – have been pediatric patients, defined as people under age 18.

The pediatric age group most likely to be infected is people 12-17 years old.

The report noted that while pediatric case counts are higher, young people are still far less likely than adults to develop severe symptoms. Only 1.3 percent pediatric patients have been hospitalized due to COVID-19, compared to 8 percent of adults.

There are six reported cases of Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children in Oregon.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



BEND, OR -- The Bend La Pine Acting School Superintendent Lora Nordquist says the new state metrics to reopen schools announced Friday, are much less restrictive. She says the state of Oregon has had the most restrictive metrics in the nation and while she wants everyone safe, she does not think the metrics have to be that strict. Nordquist says many students are struggling due to on-line as opposed to in-person classes. She says the new metrics look back two weeks instead of three, which helps. Although she also told us Friday afternoon, the problem is, last week showed high virus numbers three days in a row.  



PRINEVILLE, OR -- Crook county schools received good news late last week.  They can remain open due to new COVID-19 metrics until January 4th. Spokesman Jason Carr says state created a special designation for schools providing in-person classes called Safe Harbor. He says there has not been one virus case in Crook county connected to schools at this time. Carr says the district will follow the new state metric system after January 4th.

 



Deschutes County Sheriff’s Deputies, Sunriver and Bend Police, chased a truck driver going the wrong way on Highway 97 Friday. Sheriff’s Sergeant Jayson Janes says as deputies headed to the scene a Sunriver officer spotted the truck which by that time was in the south bound lanes. The driver sped away. Janes says the driver tried to do a U-turn to go back into the southbound lanes near Milepost 151 so the deputy put his bumper into the truck bumper. He says the driver was contacted but didn’t comply and was tased. Janes says 43-year-old Angel Grose (gross) of Canby was taken to the hospital and cited for DUII and other charges.

 


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