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Local News Archives for 2020-09


STATE ISSUES INSURANCE EMERGENCY ORDER FOR WILDFIRE VICTIMS

 

News Release from Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services
Posted on FlashAlert: September 23rd, 2020 9:25 AM

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services’ Division of Financial Regulation has issued an insurance emergency order for people affected by the state’s wildfires. 

Insurance companies must immediately take steps to do the following until the order is no longer in effect: 

  • Extend all deadlines for policyholders to report claims or submit other communications related to claims
  • Take all practicable steps to provide opportunities for policyholders to report claims
  • Establish a grace period for premium payments for all insurance policies issued, delivered, or covering a risk in the affected areas
  • Suspend cancellations and nonrenewals

The order applies to several ZIP codes across the state. The division’s bulletin No. DFR 2020-16 provides a list of ZIP codes that are subject to the order. 

“We issued this order to make sure evacuees and other Oregonians affected by these wildfires are able to access the insurance resources they need, especially while they are displaced,” said DCBS Director and Insurance Commissioner Andrew Stolfi. “We appreciate all the work our state’s insurance representatives are doing to help their customers right now, and we encourage everyone to be patient and work together throughout the recovery process.”

If your home or property was damaged by the wildfires, contact your insurance company as soon as possible to discuss your situation and learn next steps. If you still have concerns, the division’s consumer advocates are here to help. Call 888-877-4894 (toll-free) or email dfr.insurancehelp@oregon.gov.

Visit the division's wildfire insurance resource page to view the order, bulletin, and more insurance information.

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About DCBS: The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov. 

About Oregon DFR: The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov and http://dfr.oregon.gov/Pages/index.aspx.



BEACHIE CREEK FIRE UPDATE – September 23, 2020  

Acres: 192,828 acres                                                                                           Percent Containment: 46% 

Start Date: August 16, 2020                                                                              Cause: Under Investigation 

Origin Location: Opal Creek Wilderness:                                                   Fuels: Timber and logging slash 

two miles south of Jawbone Flats,                                                               Resources: 800                                                       

six miles north of Detroit, Oregon.                                                               Flights: Temporary Flight Restriction    

 

Very little growth on Beachie Creek fire 

Firefighters and public to watch for falling trees Wednesday  

                                                                                          

Salem, Ore. – A strong cold front pushes over the Willamette Valley Wednesday bringing sustained winds of 20 miles per hour and gusts as high as 45. The fire has had minimal growth, and little is expected. The bigger concern today is wind that could blow down weakened and burned trees or cause large limbs to drop. The Incident Management Team encourages residents to look up and around and be aware of these hazards. 

Heavy rain arrives late Wednesday and into Thursday. It will assist in the firefighting effort; however, additional moisture could cause rock and mudslides in steep slopes. On the north side of the fire, there is a hard closure through the Molalla River area where falling debris is likely after the severe burn there. There will be a temporary gate installed on the Molalla road this morning near Trout Creek road to help restrict public access into the fire area. In Butte Creek and well within the perimeter, the fire is creeping down a slope and sheltered from the wind. On the western fire edge, a timber company is contracted to use heavy equipment to clear vegetation and build a 20-mile control line in Abiqua Creek. There is a secondary control line in place to protect the Silver Falls area. The north and western edges are secure. 

Along the Highway 22 corridor, 115 Canadian firefighters and 18 engines are making great progress building fire line and destroying hot spots and smoldering tree stumps from Lyons, Mill City, and to Gates. Firefighters are mitigating hazards north of Gates in the Elk Horn / North Fork areas which remain closed. South of Highway 22, crews improved defensible space in the Rock Creek area. Throughout the fire perimeter, there is a Temporary Flight Restriction (TRF) which was violated Tuesday by two aircraft and a paraglider. Firefighting aircraft are grounded when the public violates the TFR.  

The Incident Management Team prepared for today’s weather system. It will not be like the Labor Day event. The Marion and Linn County Sherriff Offices continue to evaluate  and lower evacuation levels but are asking residents to stay connected with their websites and alerts:   

The Willamette National Forest, Bureau of Land Management, and State lands around the fire remain closed to the public. Go to InciWeb.gov for more information about closures in the area. 

                                                             

Public Contact Information: 

Facebook.com/BeachieCreekFire2020 

Email: 2020.beachiecreek@firenet.gov 

Phone: 541-583-0526, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. 

Inciweb 

https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/7001/ 

Smoke and Air Quality http://oregonsmoke.blogspot.com/p/air-quality-now.html 

  https://wildlandfiresmoke.net/outlooks 



Deschutes County has been approached by a company called Bio Carbon Solution Global to build a Total Recovery Facility. The head of solid waste Timm Schimke, explained to county commissioners the company says it will take all incoming waste at the Negus Transfer Station and remove metal, glass and non-carbon materials. He says Bio Carbon would take what’s left over and turn that waste into liquid fuel products. However, after lengthy discussion, commissioners agreed to discuss the issue with a consultant before making any commitment.

 



Two people are lodged in the Deschutes County Jail following a high-speed chase early Monday. A sheriff’s deputy tried to stop a 2012 BMW on Northwest Way and Upas (You-pus) Avenue in Redmond. Lieutenant William Bailey says the driver sped off, hitting speeds of 100 miles an hour. He says the deputy lost sight of the car on Highway 126 near Cline Falls Road however, other police agencies helped out. Bailey says the driver and the passenger were found and both had climbed into trees about 200 yards apart. 38-year-old Nicholas B. Bourland of Bend jailed on felony driving charges. 33-year-old Natalie J. Donohoe of Bend jailed for possession of methamphetamine. 

 



Unemployment has dropped again in Central Oregon. Economist Damon Runberg says the rate in Deschutes county was 10-point-9-per cent in July and last month fell to 7-point-7-per cent. He says Crook county fell to 8-point-9-per cent from 11-point-4-percent in July. Runberg says Jefferson county fell from 11-point-1 in July to 9-point-1 per cent in August. But Runberg says September may be a different story as the hazardous level of wildfire smoke may have kept people at home, hurting businesses. He says overall however, Central Oregon’s unemployment rates are moving in the right direction. 



BEND, OR -- A former Redmond Police detective will serve five days in jail and get 18 months probation for sexting a drug informant, according to court documents obtained by Central Oregon Daily News.   Cory Buckley was charged in June for allegedly sexting and having sexual encounters with a drug investigation informant. The woman made a complaint after Buckley resigned in January of this year while he was under investigation on a different matter.   Buckley pleaded guilty to official Misconduct earlier this month. For the full story, go here https://centraloregondaily.com/former-redmond-detective-to-serve-5-days-in-jail-for-sexting-drug-informant/

 



Oregon reports 328 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 532, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 328 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 31,313.

The new cases are in the following counties: Benton (6), Clackamas (31), Clatsop (2), Columbia (3), Coos (3), Crook (1), Curry (1), Deschutes (11), Douglas (10), Hood River (1), Jackson (12), Jefferson (1), Josephine (4), Klamath (2), Lane (32), Lincoln (1), Linn (10), Malheur (14), Marion (38), Multnomah (60), Polk (9), Umatilla (3), Wasco (25), Washington (42), and Yamhill (6).

Oregon’s 530th COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Sept.10 and died on Sept. 20, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 531st COVID-19 death is a 41-year-old man in Malheur County who tested positive on Sept. 15 and died on Sept. 20. Place of death is being confirmed. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 532nd COVID-19 death is a 64-year-old woman in Malheur County who tested positive on Sept. 1 and died on Sept. 20, at St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise, Idaho. She did not have underlying conditions.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



The League of Women Voters of Deschutes County is joining the City Club of Central Oregon in presenting candidate forums for the November election and the first one is tonight. The forum starts at 7-o’clock and can be seen on the City Club You Tube Channel. The President of the League of Women Voters, Carole Loesche  says tonight’s forum is for the 2nd Congressional District. However Republican candidate Cliff Bentz declined the invitation



BEND, OR -- The Bend La Pine Schools Board Meeting is today and will be a virtual meeting with a live stream beginning with a Work Session at 5:30. The agenda includes an update from Superintendent Lora Nordquist about school reopening. The Board will also discuss the formation of an Equity Coalition. There will also be an update on the search for a new Bend La Pine Schools Superintendent. 



Congressman Greg Walden has issued a statement following the death of former Congressman Bob Smith. Walden says Smith was a one-of-a-kind rancher, legislator and advocate for the eastern Oregon way of life. Smith served in the Oregon Legislature from 1960 to 1982. He was elected to the 2nd Congressional District where he served from 1983-to-1995 and again from 1997 to 1999.  Smith died yesterday in Medford at the age of 89.



BEND, OR -- Deschutes County commissioners heard an update yesterday on the housing strategy they’ve been working on. Senior Planner Tanya Saltzman says single family home in rural areas cost about a half million dollars, with the La Pine area cheaper at an average of 337-thousand dollars. Saltzman also told commissioners there are certain farm and forest resource lands where limited housing may be allowed. She saymanufactured homes are more affordable ranging from the mid 200-thousand to the mid-300-thousand dollar price range.



Last week’s rain gave some relief for crews on the Lionshead Fire. Information officer Rick Barton says the higher humidity’s has helped them make progress but there is still a lot of work to be done. Barton says since the start of the fire, they have gotten a lot of assistance, including additional help from Canada. Right now, the Lionshead fire is around 199,022 acres with about 13% containment.

 



Greg Walden Statement on House Passage of Bill to Nullify Fraudulent Warm Springs Treaty 

Bill would nullify the underhanded 1865 agreement and reinforce the validity of the 1855 treaty 

WASHINGTON, D.C. --Today, Representative Greg Walden (R-Hood River) released the following statement after the House passed the 1865 Treaty Nullification Act. The legislation, for which Walden introduced companion legislation in the House in 2019, would nullify a fraudulent treaty with the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation, and clearly validate an 1855 treaty that establishes the tribes’ reservation and preserves certain hunting, gathering, and fishing rights. The bill now heads to the President for signing into law. 
 
"The Warm Springs Treaty of 1865 has long been recognized as a fraud and a sham," said Walden. "The U.S. Government has not enforced the treaty and Federal Courts have also regarded it as fraudulent. I am pleased that today the House has passed this legislation to nullify this unfair treaty, which will ensure that the tribes’ rights under the 1855 treaty are fully recognized. I am proud to have worked with Senators Wyden and Merkley to correct this historical anomaly and I look forward to President Trump signing this bill into law so that we can fully right this longstanding wrong." 
 
Background Information: 
In 1855, the Warm Springs Tribes entered into a treaty with the United States defining the trusting relationship between the parties and establishing rights to land and off-reservation hunting and fishing.  
 
However, in 1865, an unscrupulous Superintendent of Indian Affairs for Oregon, J.W. Perit Huntington, wrote a supplemental treaty that amended the 1855 agreement to prohibit members of the Warm Springs from leaving their reservation without government permission and relinquishing all off-reservation rights. 
 
The 1865 treaty sought to undermine the hunting and fishing rights that were protected in the 1855 treaty. 
 

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WALDEN.HOUSE.GOV



Greg Walden Statement on Oregon Congressman Robert Smith

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Today, Representative Greg Walden released the following statement on the death of Former Oregon Congressman, Chairman Robert ‘Bob’ Freeman Smith.

"Chairman Robert ‘Bob’ Freeman Smith was a one-of-kind rancher, legislator and advocate for the eastern Oregon way of life.  He was also my friend and mentor whom I first met tagging along to the state Capitol with my father when Bob was Speaker of the Oregon House and I was about 13 years old. He was a towering figure then and will remain so through the many chapters of Oregon and American history he helped author.  Mylene and I will keep Kaye and the whole Smith family in our thoughts and prayers as we celebrate a life well lived and a public servant proudly remembered," said Walden.

In 1960, Bob’s career as a public servant began when he was elected to the Oregon House of Representatives. He served in the state House until 1972. He also was the Speaker of the Oregon House during the 1969 session and the 1971 session. He then served in the state Senate from 1973 to 1982. All together he ran in 31 elections and won every single one.  Bob went on to serve in the House of Representatives - for 12 years, first from 1983 to 1995 and then again from 1997 to 1999.  

 

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WALDEN.HOUSE.GOV



Oregon reports 201 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 529, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 201 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 30,995.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (16), Clatsop (2), Columbia (2), Coos (4), Curry (3), Deschutes (8), Douglas (2), Hood River (1), Jackson (18), Josephine (3), Klamath (2), Lane (28), Lincoln (1), Linn (1), Malheur (12), Marion (18), Morrow (2), Multnomah (35), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (4), Wasco (10), Washington (25), and Yamhill (1).

Oregon’s 527th COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Aug. 21 and died on Sept. 6, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 528th COVID-19 death is a 54-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Sept. 16 and died on Sept. 20, at Legacy Mt. Hood Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 529th COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Sept. 18 and died on Sept. 19, at OHSU. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

OHA features new COVID 19 dashboard

Today, Monday, Sept. 21, OHA is unveiling a new version of the dashboard Oregon COVID-19 Case Demographics and Disease Severity Statewide to provide more information on the demographics of COVID-19 cases in Oregon.

The new dashboard will present case rates per 100,000 people, which more clearly shows disparities in the burden of COVID-19 between demographic groups. In addition to case counts and rates, users will be able to view the percent of cases in each age group, sex, race, and ethnicity that have ever been hospitalized for their illness or have died with COVID-19.

OHA Ends Publication of Weekly Testing Summary, Data Published Daily

OHA will no longer issue the Weekly Testing Summary because the data is currently available on a more timely basis on the OHA website. The location of the information is linked below:

  1. Testing totals for the prior week(s)
  1. Test positivity statewide (cumulative)
  1. Test positivity statewide for the prior week (same location as #1)

Other testing-related announcements or issues, such as changes in the national testing supply chain, will be noted in daily press releases on an as-needed basis. OHA’s most recent testing guidance for healthcare providers can be found here.  

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



ODF FIRE REPORT AND FIRE MAP FOR MONDAY, SEPT. 21, 2020

 

News Release from Oregon Dept. of Forestry
Posted on FlashAlert: September 21st, 2020 11:18 AM

Downloadable file: Fire_map_for_Monday_Sept._21_2020.pdf

SALEM, Ore. - The Oregon Department of Forestry is closely monitoring 10 major fires in Oregon, down from 17 originally (see table below for details). Fires are removed from the list when they are 100% lined and fire managers are confident in their progress toward containment.

There have been more than 7,500 personnel assigned to these fires, not including many of the government employees, landowners, forestland operators, and members of the community who are contributing every day. There have been resources from 39 states and multiple Canadian provinces in this fight alongside Oregonians.

About 1 million acres have burned in Oregon since the start of this year, which is nearly double the 10-year average of approximately 557,811.

Fire name

Acres burned (est.)

Containment

Location

Lionshead

198,647

       13%

20 miles W of Warm Springs

Beachie Creek

192,764

       38%

15 miles N of Detroit

Holiday Farm

170,637

       17%

3 miles W of McKenzie Bridge

Riverside

137,880

       25%

2 miles SE of Estacada

Archie Creek

131,598

       41%

20 miles E of Glide

Brattain

50,447

       52%

8 miles S of Paisley

Slater

42,214 in Oregon

       18%

SE of Cave Junction (also in No. California)

S. Obenchain

32,671

       65%

5 miles E of Eagle Point

Two Four Two

14,473

       77%

W/NW of Chiloquin

Thielsen

9,689

       22%

E of Diamond Lake

More information



BEND, OR -- Bend City Council met last week to talk about efforts to develop more housing in the area to keep up with the growing of population. City Manager Eric King says one thing that’s unique to this pandemic that they’ve seen earlier on, is the increase in numbers of people in Central Oregon. He hopes they can find a solution to the continued demand.



SALEM,. OR -- The Oregon State Board of Education has unanimously approved the “All Students Belong” rule. The new temporary rule…the first of its kind in the nation…bans the use of Confederate flags, swastikas or nooses in all Oregon Schools. Bend Republican State Representative Cheri Helt says she will move to codify the “All Students Belong” rule into state law in the 2021 legislative session. She says the “All Students Belong” rule sends a message to Indigenous and people of color Oregon won’t tolerate racism, white supremacy or hate.
 



There are 11 active fires still burning in Oregon this morning. The largest being the Lionshead Fire west of Warm Springs at almost 199-thousand acres burned, 264 residences destroyed and is 13-percent contained. The Beachie Creek Fire is 38% contained, has consumed over 192-thousand acres and destroyed 470 homes.  The Holiday Farm Fire along the McKenzie has burned almost 171-thousand acres, destroyed 431 homes and is 14% contained. The Riverside Fire is almost 138-thousand acres large, has destroyed 57 homes and is 25% contained.  

 



Oregon Senators Jeff Merkley, Ron Wyden and Congressman Greg Walden announced Friday the U-S Senate approved naming the Bend VA clinic in honor of the late Robert Maxwell. The World War 2 veteran was a recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor and worked as a schoolteacher in Bend for many years. Congressman Walden urged the House Veterans Affairs Committee to quickly move the bill to the full U-S House for a final vote. 

 



BEND, OR -- The Deschutes County Board of Commissioners will meet at 1-this afternoon. On their agenda is a discussion led by Solid Waste Director Timm Schimke on a Bio Carbon Solutions Proposal. Commissioners will consider a grant application for Software and Hardware technology for the sheriff. The agenda also includes a discussion of Housing Strategies led by Associate County Planner Tanya Saltzman.



BEND, OR -- Deschutes County 9-1-1 received a report of a lost dual sport motorcycle rider in the Triangle Hill area just after 11pm Saturday night. 29-year-old Chris Faith was reported by friends that they had been riding together in that area earlier in the day and had gotten separated.  Sheriff’s deputies and more than 20 Search and  Rescue volunteers began looking for Faith at 6:30 yesterday morning. Almost 3 hours later, 9-1-1 received a call from a mountain bike rider who had come across Faith who was tired and cold. Nearby search teams responded to Faith's location, began warming efforts and after evaluation by Bend Fire Department. Faith was reunited with his family. 



ODOT: Valley, No. Coast:
At 8 a.m. on Monday morning, OR 22E will be opened up to mile post 33 at Gates Hill Road in Gates. Marion County still has the North Fork Road and Pioneer Road closed at OR 22E. OR 22E remains closed from Gates Hill Road to the OR 22/U.S. 20 junction (Santiam Junction).
Travelers should make sure to drive the posted speeds, exercise caution and be aware of fire fighting equipment and vehicles that are still operating in the area.



Oregon reports 295 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — The state’s death toll from COVID-19 is unchanged from yesterday and remains at 521, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 295 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 30,342.

The new cases are in the following counties: Baker (1), Benton (4), Clackamas (28), Clatsop (3), Coos (2), Deschutes (7), Douglas (5), Hood River (1), Jackson (14), Jefferson (2), Klamath (2), Lake (1), Lane (20), Linn (5), Malheur (20), Marion (51), Morrow (7), Multnomah (56), Polk (4), Tillamook (2), Umatilla (16), Wasco (3), Washington (36) and Yamhill (5).

New COVID-19 modeling released

OHA released its latest COVID-19 modeling report today, showing that the current rate of transmission is continuing a downward trend that began in mid-July, meaning that each case is generating less than one other case.

The model looked at the following scenarios:

If transmission continues at its present rate, then by Oct. 8. daily infections would decrease from 360 to 190. New daily cases would decrease to 80. Severe cases – those requiring hospitalization – would decrease to 6 and the reproduction rate would remain at .87.

If there is a 5-percentage-point decline in transmission, over the next month there would be 130 daily infections. New daily cases would decline to 50. Severe cases would drop to four, and the reproduction rate would be .74.

If there is a 5-percentage-point increase in transmission rates over the next month, the model projects 400 new daily infections with new daily cases rising by 80. Under this scenario, severe cases would double from six to 12.

More importantly, this scenario results in a reproduction rate of 1.0, meaning that the spread of COVID would be increasing, reversing the progress made in recent weeks.

As has been shown since the beginning of the pandemic in Oregon, these trends remain very sensitive to small changes in transmission levels.

Wildfires, which started on Labor Day, are widespread throughout Oregon and have led to evacuations of an estimated 40,000 people and extremely hazardous air quality.

The wildfires and subsequent poor air quality have decreased availability of community COVID-19 testing, but it is unclear what effects the evacuations and the poor air quality might have on COVID-19 transmission and symptoms.

Model results should be interpreted with caution, given these recent reductions in testing and uncertainty behind various COVID-19 model assumptions.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



Merkley, Wyden, Walden Applaud Senate Passage of Bill to Rename Bend VA Clinic After Decorated WWII Veteran

Robert Maxwell received the Medal of Honor for his service

 

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Oregon’s U.S. Senators Jeff Merkley and Ron Wyden, along with Representative Greg Walden, today applauded the Senate passage of a bill introduced by the delegation to rename the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) clinic in Bend after Robert Maxwell, a World War II veteran and Medal of Honor Recipient who lived in Bend.

 

At the time of Maxwell’s passing, he was the oldest Medal of Honor recipient in the nation and one of four remaining veterans from World War II to be awarded the Medal of Honor. After his courageous service, he worked as a teacher in Bend.

 

“Throughout Robert Maxwell’s time in uniform during World War II and later as a teacher in Central Oregon, he answered the call to serve and put the needs of others first,” said Merkley, who introduced the bill in the Senate. “Naming Bend’s VA clinic after Mr. Maxwell would be a fitting tribute to his service and commitment to his community, and I’m going to keep working to get this bill across the finish line and signed into law.”

 

“Robert Maxwell’s World War II heroism for our country and then his service teaching generations of students in central Oregon exemplify the very best of our state,” Wyden said. “I’m glad the Senate has passed this bill to honor Mr. Maxwell, and will keep fighting to complete the task of naming the VA clinic in Bend for this Medal of Honor winner and outstanding teacher.”

 

 “Bob Maxwell was an American hero, public servant, and friend to all,” said Walden, who introduced the companion legislation in the House. “Renaming the Bend VA Clinic after him will honor his dedication to this nation and serve as a reminder of all he gave to his community in Central Oregon and his lifelong commitment to helping his fellow service members. I am pleased this bill passed the Senate and I urge the House Veteran’s Affairs Committee to quickly move this bill to the floor so that we can get it to President Trump’s desk and it can become law -- forever ensuring Bob’s legacy is honored and his heroism is remembered.”

 

Oregon’s congressional delegation previously wrote to the Chairs and Ranking Members of the Senate and House Veterans Affairs committees in support of the renaming. The City of Bend, American Legion Department of OregonVeterans of Foreign Wars Department of Oregon, and Disabled American Veterans Department of Oregon also advocated for the change.

 

There are currently six VA medical facilities across the country that are named after Medal of Honor recipients, including Loren R. Kaufman VA Clinic in The Dalles. The next steps for the bill would be for it to pass the U.S. House of Representatives before being signed into law by the President.

 

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Lionshead Fire Update – Friday, September 18, 2020 – 9:00 a.m. 

 

Fire activity is more subdued today due to lower temperatures and increased relative humidity. Rain is anticipated over most of the fire area. There is still active fire, but fire managers expect less fire activity for the immediate future. The lightning-caused fire started on August 16th approximately 14 miles west of the Warm Springs community on Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs land. It has spread primarily to the west, onto the Willamette National Forest and beyond. Historic windstorms in early September are a major cause of the spread. It is being managed with a full suppression strategy. Firefighter and public safety are the top priorities for all efforts.  

 

Weather and Fire Behavior: Fire activity should continue to moderate with the weather. Temperatures will be cooler today and rain is expected. Thunderstorms are possible. The National Weather Service has issued a flash flood warning for Marion and Linn Counties. Debris flows are possible during this rain event. Expect cleaner air through the weekend. Fire behavior will likely increase as warmer and drier conditions return in a few days.  

 

Yesterday: Crews identified options along the northern edge of the fire to connect fire line west from the B-200 Road to Olallie Lakes. Good progress was made preparing roads and dozer lines for burnout operations. Structure protection efforts continued in many areas on the western reaches. Progress is also being made on spot fires near Sisi Butte. The Sisi Butte Lookout was wrapped for structure protection. Much of the mop up work in the Olallie Lakes area was completed. Along the southern edge of the fire, crews continued to work with local fire districts in the communities along Highway 22 on mop up and patrol. Structure groups worked in Marion Forks and monitored the Stahlman area.  

 

Today’s Activities: Firefighters will take advantage of the favorable weather conditions to work adjacent to the fire’s edge to secure the fire perimeter. Firefighters will continue to scout and establish fire line adjacent to the fire in preparation for burnout operations in the coming days. Crews will perform structure protection activities, such as clearing brush and vegetation from around homes in Detroit, Idanha, and New Idanha. To the east and southeast, crews continue mop up operations and removal of fire-weakened trees for public safety. As of this morning, the Rocky Mountain Team 1 assumed command of the Lionshead Fire.  

 

Evacuations: Evacuation Notices remain in place for the Lionshead Fire. Level 3 “Go!” evacuation notices were issued for the communities of Detroit, Idanha, and Breitenbush. The Warm Springs Police Department, with assistance from the National Guard, is maintaining the Level 1 “Get Ready” evacuation notice for the Sid Walter area, including Miller flat and the for the half mile east of Highway 26 between mile markers 91.5 and 99, and a half mile east and west of the Highway between markers 99 and 100.

 

Closures: Roads and trails near the fires remain closed for public safety. This includes roads and trails on the Confederated Tribes of Warm Spring lands adjacent to the fire and a 40-mile section of the Pacific Crest Trail between Santiam Pass and Olallie Lake. Forest closures are in place for Deschutes, Mt. Hood and Willamette National Forests: Deschutes NF Alerts   Willamette NF Alerts Mt. Hood NF Alerts.  

 

FOR ADDITIONAL FIRE INFORMATION: Fire Information: 971-277-5075

TripCheck: https://www.tripcheck.com/

Inciweb: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/7049/

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/

LionsheadFire Email: mailto:2020.lionshead@firenet.gov

 

 

Lionshead Fire 

Pacific Northwest Incident Management Team 3

Public Information Phone: 971-277-5075

Incident E-mail: 2020.lionshead@firenet.gov 

Incident Website: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/7049 

Facebook: www.facebook.com/LionsheadFire 



COMMUNITY INPUT SOUGHT REGARDING POLICING

The City of Bend wants to hear how local government can be more responsive and accountable to the community when it comes to law enforcement policy.

We are inviting people in Bend to answer open-ended questions located at bendoregon.gov/community-input by 5 p.m. on September 25.  Questions ask about individuals’ experiences with Bend Police, seek ideas for best protecting the community and solicit suggestions about ideal public engagement with police. People can answer as few or as many of the four questions as they want.

The City will also conduct a virtual listening session on Saturday, October 17, on similar topics. The City Council will receive a report of all input later this year.

“We need to hear ideas about ways Bend Police can best serve our community,” said Mayor Sally Russell. “Your experiences matter to us and we’re making an effort to listen, especially from those people most impacted.”

All input opportunities will be made possible in Spanish: bendoregon.gov/aporte-comunitario.

city of bend

APORTE COMUNITARIO DESEADO SOBRE PRACTICAS POLICIALES

La Ciudad de Bend quiere escuchar de ustedes sobre cómo podemos mejorar nuestra respuesta y cumplir con nuestra responsabilidad a la comunidad en relación a pólizas policiales. 

Empezando hoy la Ciudad invita a los residentes de Bend que respondan las preguntas en bendoregon.gov/aporte-comunitario. Esta oportunidad para aportar en línea cierra a las 5 p.m. el 25 septiembre. Las preguntas se tratan sobre las experiencias de individuos con la Policía de Bend, ideas para mejor proteger a la comunidad, y sugerencias sobre participación pública ideal en el desarrollo de pólizas policiales.

La Ciudad también tendrá una sesión virtual en octubre para escuchar a la comunidad en respecto a temas similares. El Consejo Municipal recibirá un reporte resumiendo los comentarios de la comunidad a fin de año.

“Necesitamos escuchar sus ideas sobre cómo puede mejor servir la comunidad la Policía de Bend,” dijo Alcaldesa Sally Russell. “Sus experiencias nos importan y estamos haciendo un esfuerzo para escuchar, especialmente de las personas más impactadas.”

Todas las oportunidades para brindar aporte se harán accesible en español.


MEET OUR NEW POLICE CHIEF:

Hear how Mike Krantz plans to work to make sure the Police Department provides the service today’s community wants.

WATCH the video on our YouTube Channel!


OREGON WILDFIRES

OREGON FIRE MAP

Firefighters across Oregon continue to battle several large wildfires burning more than 800,000 acres.

Locally, smoke has inundated the area creating hazardous air quality levels. As the blazes continue to put off smoke west of the Cascades, we could continue to see areas of smoke and haze here on the east side for many days. To track the latest air quality conditions head to airnow.gov.

Sign-Up for Alerts!

Deschutes County alert system gives you critical information about natural disasters, including fire and air quality due to smoke, and other emergencies that need your attention.

Traveling to and from Bend could be an issue if you’re trying to head into the valley. When the fires began, many of the main highways over the mountains were closed. Highway 97 to our south near Chiloquin was also closed for a period of time. It’s a good idea to stay up to date on road closures in our region. Head to TripCheck’s website for more information.

Stay informed and safe with information from the Oregon state government.  The website wildfire.oregon.gov, is a hub for accessing Oregon Wildfire Resources.  It has translation options for multiple languages. There are links to the Red Cross Safe & Well Status to list yourself safe OR search the registry to check on the status of loved ones.

How to Help

We’ve seen a tremendous acts of generosity coming out of Central Oregon and Bend. If you’d like to find out ways you can help head to the Oregon Office of Emergency Management’s portal to get registered: oregonrecovers.communityos.org.

A Message From The City Manager

firefighter on a back burn

Many of our City staff members have been assisting in responding to the wildfires across Oregon. Here at home, Bend Fire & Rescue employees have remained exceptionally responsive to the needs of this community. Police and Fire teams have been working on education and enforcement in homeless populations, to work on lessening fire risk. And, others have worked to help individuals without homes to find emergency shelter from the smoke.

Bend Fire & Rescue has 10 people assigned to five different fires:

  • An engine and crew in Paisley on the Brattain Fire
  • An engine and crew at the Lionshead Fire burning near Mt. Jefferson on the Warm Springs Reservation
  • A deputy chief is at the Beachie Creek Fire along Highway 22
  • A battalion chief is assisting the Holiday Farm Fire along Highway 126
  • A captain is at the South Obenchain Fire in Southern Oregon

Bend Police has also sent a few members to assist Jackson County Sheriff’s Office with recovery efforts and patrolling areas that have been affected by looting.

The City’s Accessibility Manager is assisting the Red Cross as a Disability Integration Supervisor.

I am proud of the effort and continue to be humbled by the dedication of the team here at the City of Bend.

     - City Manager, Eric King


COVID-19 UPDATE: 

Travel

The City of Bend extended its order discouraging travel in Bend through Oct. 26. All stays in Bend at hotels, motels, inns, bed and breakfasts, RV parks, short term rentals, and all other temporary lodging facilities are discouraged unless for reasons of health, safety, or employment, or other permitted essential travel.

The City wants to emphasize that Bend is open to those seeking shelter or who have been displaced from their homes by the fire situation. During this unprecedented time of fires in Oregon, the City of Bend stands ready to help however we can.

Masks

The Bend City Council has allowed local enforcement of statewide mask requirements.

The City of Bend’s Code Enforcement division has set up a hotline to report mask violations in the City of Bend. Mask Complaint Hotline: (541) 323-7155.

There are a number of places to report issues related to COVID-19 restrictions. Use this list to find out where to report your complaint.

Relief Programs

In response to the financial impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on people in our community, the City of Bend developed payment relief programs to support our community members and local businesses.  

To date, the Utility Relief Program has provided $34,000 in assistance to commercial utility customers, out of $50,000 in available funds for business relief.  

Municipal Court has not been suspending driver’s licenses for non-payment of fines or failure to appear in court, affecting over 1,200 people. It has also extended existing payment plans without penalty and extended the timeline for people to attend traffic school. Also, more than 450 people have used a new online option for traffic school.  

To learn more about the City’s payment relief programs, visit bendoregon.gov/covid19.  

Pinecone divider.

EMPIRE IMPROVEMENTS PROJECT UPDATE

looking over empire to the west

The Empire Avenue Extension was completed in August. This extension begins at the east side of the new roundabout at Empire Avenue and Purcell Boulevard and continues southeast to the intersection of 27th Street and Butler Market Road. In mid-August the new roundabout at 27th Street and Butler Market reopened to traffic in the northbound and southbound directions.

The east leg of the Butler Market Road & 27th Street roundabout and the north and west legs of the Butler Market Road & Deschutes Market Road roundabout opened to pedestrian, bicycle, and vehicular traffic on Sept. 4.

The opening of the western Butler Market Road approach will occur in late September or early October.

For more information on the Empire Corridor Improvements project head to its website: bendoregon.gov/empire.


END OF THE SEASON BACKFLOW TESTING REQUIRED

small child enjoying a sprinkler

The City of Bend wants to remind its water customers that irrigation backflow assemblies must be tested before the end-of-season sprinkler system blowouts.

Read more here.

 


COUNCIL UPDATES:

Neighborhood Parking Benefit District Pilot Program Approval

residential parking area

Council approved an Old Bend Neighborhood Parking Benefit District pilot program to help resolve parking challenges that residents and business owners have experienced over the years. Councilors shrunk the originally-proposed boundary to properties generally west of NW Broadway. The pilot program lasts through Dec. 31, 2021, and could be extended if it effectively manages parking in the area. Annual residential parking permits could be in the $15-30 range. Read more at bendoregon.gov/parking-district.

Easton Master Planned Development

Council approved a first reading of an ordinance to create the Easton Master Planned Development on 75 acres of residential land on the city’s south end, near SE 15th Street and Knott Road, east of the new Caldera High School. The plan provides a mix of housing types for owners and renters. It includes 428 lots for future single-family homes, 114 townhome lots, 8.4 acres of open space including a private park, community center and public park. Here is a summary.


WINTER IS COMING

snow plow leaving garage

With wildfires in our current midst, it’s hard to imagine winter already. But we are a geography of extremes!

Bend is a 3,623-foot-elevation town known for great downhill and Nordic skiing. That means we get snow! Average snowfall is more than 20 inches of snow in a winter. Storms vary from a couple of inches to more than a foot. The severity of snow and road conditions also can vary depending on which part of town you live in.

Get the resources and supplies you need on hand before you’re snowed in. It’s never too soon to make some phone lists, find your snow tires and buy snow shovels and roof rakes.

Many of our neighbors rely on a clear sidewalk to get to and from work, school or bus stops – and it’s the property owner’s responsibility to shovel! To help keep sidewalks safe and passable for your neighbors during winter snow storms, read these guidelines about snow removal from sidewalks.

Are you an experienced snow driver? Deschutes County offers a great winter driving training for those lacking winter experience. And be sure to peek at the Oregon Department of Transportation’s helpful winter driving guide.

More tips for preparing and protecting your home can be found at bendoregon.gov/winter.

 


 

NEWPORT DESIGN UPDATE

drone view of newport avenue

The Newport Corridor Improvements project addresses a failing and deficient storm drain system serving the South Awbrey Butte drainage basin while simultaneously replacing aging water and sewer infrastructure and bringing the entire corridor up to current standards, increasing safety, connectivity and mobility for all users of this corridor. 

Construction on the project is slated to begin in Spring 2021 and will last through Fall 2022.

City staff have been working with property owners and community members adjacent to the construction area, which runs along Newport Avenue from College Way to 9th Street, and down Nashville Avenue to the Deschutes River. An open house is being planned later this Fall.  

Sign up to receive this information along with other project updates, closures and detour routes online at bendoregon.gov/newportimprovements

 



Acres: 192,012 acres                                                                                           Percent Containment: 20% 

Start Date: August 16, 2020                                                                              Cause: Under Investigation 

Origin Location: Opal Creek Wilderness:                                                    Fuels: Timber and logging slash 

two miles south of Jawbone Flats, six miles north of Detroit, Oregon.      

Resources: 592 

 

Rainfall Decreases Intensity of Beachie Creek Fire 

                                             Firefighters monitor change in weather, different risks.                       

Salem, Ore. – The Beachie Creek fire is expected to be less active Friday as precipitation moderates fire behavior. The decrease in fire behavior and intensity today will allow firefighters to continue connecting and strengthening the containment lines around the fire. The emphasis is still protecting communities to the south and west of the fire. Firefighters will continue to directly attack the fire around Scotts Mills, Stayton, Lyons, Mill City, and Detroit. Other crews continue work to protect timber investments on the north side of the fire near Scotts Mills. 

While firefighters build containment and contingency lines, they are also monitoring for additional risks from rain such as landslides, flooding, or trees falling.   

The Incident Command Team continues to address infrastructure and community needs by assisting power companies, insurance companies, and communication firms. The Team is providing these organizations with information, logistics, and transportation support. This work will lead to allowing residents and community members back into the area. 

Fire officials also continue to work closely with the Marion County and Linn County Sheriff’s Offices, ODOT and the Oregon State Police to coordinate recovery efforts along the Santiam Canyon. Currently 4,056 structures are at Level 3 evacuations and another 3,499 are in level 2 evacuations. To protect first responders and communities near the fire, it is imperative that everyone heeds road closures and evacuations. Anyone who enters the fire perimeter jeopardizes firefighting and rescue operations, puts lives at risk, and potentially increases the time it will take to return residents to their homes. 

The weather pattern change brings showers to the area of the fire. Rain is expected for the early part of Friday before tapering off later in the day. Maximum temperatures today will be around 65 – 70 degrees and minimum relative humidity will be over 70 percent across the fire area. Cooler temperatures with more humidity are expected over the weekend.   

The Willamette National Forest, Bureau of Land Management, and State lands around the fire remain closed to the public. Go to InciWeb (link below) for more information about closures in the area. 

Public information: 

Facebook: facebook.com/BeachieCreek 

E-mail: BeachieCreek@gmail.com  

Phone: 541-583-0526, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. 

Inciweb 

https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/7001/ 

Oregon Smoke Blog http://oregonsmoke.blogspot.com/p/air-quality-now.html 

 



Air quality advisory extended through Saturday for Northwest, Central, Eastern and some parts of Southern Oregon

Date: Sept. 18, 2020

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality extended an air quality advisory through Saturday for Northwest, Central, Eastern and some parts of Southern Oregon due to smoke from fires in Oregon and California. 

** Información en español ** 

Smoke is beginning to clear out of the I-5 corridor. Portland and Salem areas were still at the unhealthy  levels Friday morning, but should continue to improve throughout the day. The Columbia River Gorge, Central Oregon and Eastern Oregon are still in unhealthy to hazardous levels, but should start clearing out Saturday morning. Some communities in Southern Oregon, including Cave Junction and Provolt, are getting smoke from the Slater Fire, and may remain in unhealthy or hazardous levels through Saturday or longer. 

Areas nearby active fires may continue to have smoke impacts. 

Health officials encourage people to open up windows and begin clearing out their indoor air once smoke levels have dropped into moderate (yellow) and good (green) categories. 

Smoke levels can change rapidly depending on weather. Check current conditions by visiting the Oregon Smoke Information Blog, downloading the free OregonAIR app on your smartphone, or going to on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Air Now

Smoke can irritate the eyes and lungs and worsen some medical conditions. Young children, adults over 65, pregnant women and people with heart disease, asthma or other respiratory conditions are most at risk. 

Protect your health when smoke levels are high: 

  • Avoid outdoor activities and stay inside if possible. Keep windows and doors closed.
  • Be aware of smoke in your area and avoid places with the highest levels.
  • Use high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. These can be portable filters or can be installed in indoor heating, ventilation, cooling and air purification systems. You can also create your own air purifying filter by following these easy DIY air filter instructions.
  • Check with your local health department or this 211 list to see if they have community clean air shelters set up where people can get temporary relief from the smoke.
  • If you have heart or lung disease or asthma, follow your healthcare provider’s advice.

Cloth, dust and surgical masks don’t protect from the harmful particles in smoke. N95 respirators that are tested to ensure proper fit and that are worn correctly may provide protection. Otherwise, they might just provide a false sense of security. They are not available in children’s sizes and are not recommended for strenuous activities. N95 respirators are in limited supply due to COVID-19. Additional information on wildfire smoke and COVID-19 can be found on the Centers for Disease Control webpage

Emergency managers are discouraging travel to lessen the spread of COVID-19 while allowing firefighters and other emergency crews to remain focused on wildfire. Relief from wildfire smoke should be coming soon to most parts of Oregon.

DEQ’s color-coded Air Quality Index provides current air quality conditions and ranks air quality as follows: Green is good. Yellow is moderate. Orange is unhealthy for sensitive groups such as children, seniors, pregnant women and those with respiratory conditions. Red is unhealthy for everyone. Purple is very unhealthy for everyone. Maroon is hazardous. 

Several highways and roads are closed around Oregon. Check TripCheck for the latest information. 

Find more information: Oregon Smoke Blog 

 



? All Students Belong

Oregon State Board of Education Adopts All Students Belong rule to help ensure Oregon’s schools are safe and inclusive for all students and staff.

?(Salem, Ore). – This morning, the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) filed a temporary administrative rule with the Secretary of State, adopted yesterday by the State Board of Education, that focuses on the health and safety of our students and educators by creating a safer and more inclusive school climate. 

During yesterday’s Board of Education meeting, the board unanimously passed the All Students Belong temporary rule to prohibit the use of hate symbols in schools and to establish requirements for anti-bias incidents at a district level. 

Like similar initiatives currently in place in Oregon school districts, this effort was sparked by students as a response to the increasing number of incidents impacting their ability to access education in Oregon’s schools. 

“Our students called us out and into action,” Oregon Department of Education Director Colt Gill said. “The Oregon Department of Education is committed to ensuring that Oregon’s schools are safe and inclusive for all students and staff, and the All Students Belong rule is an important step in that process. The noose, Confederate flag and swastika are being used to bully and harm students and staff, and this is particularly true for students of color. Students must feel like they are safe and belong in their own schools if they are to learn, work and grow to their fullest potential. It is our responsibility to make sure that all of our school communities feel safe and welcomed, and we support youth to set a moral standard.”

The rule requires districts to adopt and implement policies and procedures that prohibit, at a minimum, the use or display of the noose, swastika, or Confederate flag in any program or school-sponsored activities except where used in teaching curriculum that is aligned with the Oregon State Standards. This applies to both in-person and distance learning environments. The rule will take effect today, and districts will be asked to have policies in place by January 1, 2021. A permanent rule will be introduced in several months.

ODE will continue to support school districts in developing rules, policies, and procedures over the next several months by providing guidance, educational resources, and toolkits to support implementation of these policies. Most districts have existing nondiscrimination policies and procedures for addressing bias incidents that pose a threat to student, staff and/or community safety that can serve as a starting point for responding to incidents in which hate symbols or hate speech occur in both in-person and in distance learning situations.

“Our goal is to create stronger and safer school communities,” Gill said. “Removing these symbols is an important step in making sure that Oregon schools are for everyone, no exceptions. All students belong.”

# # #



SALEM, Ore. - Oregon Department of Forestery is closely monitoring 10 major fires in Oregon, (see table below for details). Echo Mountain and the North Cascade complexes were removed from today’s report. Fires are removed from the list when they are 100% lined and fire managers are confident in their progress toward containment. There are more than 6,500 personnel assigned to these fires from across the nation and Canada. This doesn’t include the many government emergency response employees, landowners, forestland operators, and members of the community who are contributing to the fight in whatever way they can. About 1 million acres have burned in Oregon since the start of this year, which is nearly double the 10-year average of approximately 557,811.

Fire name

Acres burned (est.)

Containment

Location

Lionshead

192,719

10%

20 miles W of Warm Springs

Beachie Creek

192,012

20%

15 miles N of Detroit

Holiday Farm

172,510

10%

3 miles W of McKenzie Bridge

Riverside

137,865

10%

2 miles SE of Estacada

Archie Creek

130,429

25%

20 miles E of Glide

Brattain

44,800

20%

8 miles S of Paisley

Slater

41,395 in Oregon

10%

SE of Cave Junction (also in No. California)

S. Obenchain

32,833

35%

5 miles E of Eagle Point

Two Four Two

14,473

37%

W/NW of Chiloquin

Thielsen

9,995

15%

E of Diamond Lake

Please note: The acres burned estimates above are based very limited information available. These numbers will change over the next several days, in some cases significantly. We will be taking every opportunity to map these fires. Fire maps are an important tool for both ongoing response operations and keeping people informed. 

More information



MILL CITY AND GATES REDUCED TO LEVEL 2 WITH SPECIFIC ROUTE FOR ENTRY TO THESE CITIES

 

News Release from Marion Co. Sheriff's Office
*Important Information*

 

Evacuation levels for the Cities of Mill City and Gates are being reduced to Level 2 – “Be Set” at 10:00 a.m. Today, September 18th, 2020.  In a level 2 evacuation area, community members are permitted to return to the area, though they should remain prepared to evacuate should conditions change.

 

As access to these cities is reopening, Highway 22 will remain closed between Highway 226 and Mile Post 29, near the west end of Mill City. The four mile section of Highway 22 between the cities of Mill City and Gates will be open for travel. Community members returning to Gates and Mill City will need to use the following travel route to access their residences and businesses:

 

  • Highway 22 east to Hwy 226
  • Hwy 226 turns into Lyons/Mill City Dr
  • Lyons/Mill City Dr to SW Kingwood Ave
  • Kingwood Ave to Gates School Rd
  • Gates School Rd to E Sorbin Ave
  • E Sorbin Ave to Highway 22

 

The areas immediately to the north of the city limits of Mill City and Gates remain at a Level 3 – “Go” evacuation status.  Road closures will be in effect on Carr Road, Hudel Road and Gates Hill Road north of the city limits.

 

Current evacuation areas as of 10:00 am, 9/18/2020:

Level 3 – “Go”

Detroit

Idanha

Breitenbush

Highway 22 @ Highway 226, east to Mile Post 29, including North Fork Road, Pioneer Road, and other roadways in this cooridor.

Level 2 – “Be Set”

Lyons

Mehama

Mill City

Gates

Fernridge Rd west of Shellburg Creek Rd to Basil Hill

Crooked Finger Rd & Moss Lane

Level 1 – “Ready”

Scotts Mills

Areas east of Meridian Road, Davis Creek, and Victor Point south to the Marion County line

To see detailed current Marion County Evacuation Zones please visit: http://bit.ly/MCEvacZones

If you happen to live in fire impacted areas of Linn County, updated evacuation maps can be found at: www.LinnSheriff.org



BEND, OR  -- Wildfire in the Northwest has raised concerns of possible local fires here in Central Oregon. Bend City Manager Eric King says they’re doing everything they can to mitigate some of the risk. The smoke has impacted Bend for a week now. King says there are a lot of crews spread out across the state. He says it’s tough to deal with the smoke but he feels it would be a lot tougher if we were west of Cascades with the fire. They are trying to protect city employees from both smoke and COVID at the same time.



Highway 26 from Seaside to the Idaho Border is being dedicated today as a POW-MIA Highway. This is the first highway of its kind in the United States. Bend Heroes Foundation chairman Dick Tobiason says signs along Highway 26 will honor Oregon’s 902 POW’s and 1-thousand veterans who are still MIA. He says there will be a special ceremony at 10-this morning in and another ceremony at 2-this afternoon in Prineville. Tobiason says there’s also a special ceremony starting at 7-this morning in Bend at the memorial in Brooks Park. That event will honor Bend’s 20 POW’s 15 MIA’s and 2 MIA’s whose remains have been recovered.



WARM SPRINGS RESERVATION, OR -- The FBI is offering a 10-thousand-dollar reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of whoever was responsible for a fatal arson fire May 17th on the Warm Springs Reservation. Beth Anne Steele at the FBI says the fire killed 77-year old Lamont Brown. She says a second person in the home suffered critical injuries and a third resident did escape but not before being seriously burned. Steele says a 4th person escaped through a window and was uninjured. Anyone with information can call the Bend or Portland FBI office, or the Warm Springs Police. Information can also be left on the website, tips-dot-fbi-dot-gov

 



WARM SPRINGS RESERVATION, OR -- The FBI is offering a 10-thousand-dollar reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of whoever was responsible for a fatal arson fire May 17th on the Warm Springs Reservation. Beth Anne Steele at the FBI says the fire killed 77-year old Lamont Brown. She says a second person in the home suffered critical injuries and a third resident did escape but not before being seriously burned. Steele says a 4th person escaped through a window and was uninjured. Anyone with information can call the Bend or Portland FBI office, or the Warm Springs Police. Information can also be left on the website, tips-dot-fbi-dot-gov

 



PRINEVILLE, OR -- A tragic story out of Prineville:  Yesterday afternoon about 6:00 o'clock rescue crews were called to a home on Charles Road. A 2-year-old child had been run over by a vehicle. Immediate medical aid was given to the child who was taken to St. Charles Prineville where the child died of their injuries. The investigation determined is was an awful accident.   Names of the child's family are being withheld while they deal with their loss.

 



PRINEVILLE, OR -- A man who lives at Juniper Acres and several neighbors want to help people who have had to evacuate from their home due to wildfire. Terry Strife says they have about 60 acres of land available for fire evacuees who have a travel trailer. He says they have water, have a cat and can blade land, there’s fenced land for livestock, solar panels, generators and septic dumps. Strife says those who need to have a place to live until their home can be rebuilt can do so at no charge. Terry Strife 541-410-1576.



BEND, OR -- About 8:30 last night Bend Police received a call of a man with multiple weapons on the third floor of the downtown parking garage overlooking downtown area bars.  The caller said he was sitting on the ground between two vehicles with body armor on the ground next to him, armed with a handgun, assembling a rifle, and had another gun of some kind.  Officers quickly located the subject, who had a gas mask around his neck and closed the garage. More officers arrived along with a K-9 unit. Once discovered, 38-year-old Timothy Dort of Bend, cooperated with police commands and was taken into custody peacefully. Officers found multiple air soft type firearms, all very closely resembling live guns.  Dort was charged with disorderly conduct and taken to jail.



Oregon reports 215 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — The state’s death toll from COVID-19 is unchanged from yesterday and remains at 521, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 215 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 30,060.

The new cases are in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (11), Clatsop (1), Columbia (3), Deschutes (7), Douglas (1), Grant (2), Hood River (1), Jackson (14), Jefferson (7), Klamath (7), Lane (23), Linn (11), Malheur (11), Marion (28), Morrow (1), Multnomah (43), Polk (2), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (7), Washington (29), and Yamhill (3).

Testing Note: The Oregon State Public Health Laboratory resumed normal operations yesterday after a three-day closure caused by HVAC problems and related poor indoor air quality. The lab is once again accepting and testing specimens.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



BEND, OR -- The Deschutes County Emergency Manager briefed county commissioners yesterday about the wildfires that have decimated large areas in western Oregon. Sergeant Nathan Garibay said almost all of the evacuees in Redmond are now in hotels. He was asked about the needs of the areas devastated by wildfires. Garibay says counties and individuals will need financial assistance in the coming months. He says some help will come from the federal government through FEMA but the long term needs may require more money for wildfire burned areas.    



PRINEVILLE, OR -- Deschutes County Fairgrounds is now home to many evacuees from the fires that destroyed their homes. Mayor George Endicott says if people want to donate to help the evacuees, you can send money to the Red Cross. He says please do not send clothing and goods because they don’t have the personnel to sort and hand them out. A woman who heard the radio interview, on KBND, called the Mayor to donate beef from her ranch to the evacuees.

 



BEND, OR -- Last Tuesday, the Holiday Farm Fire destroyed most of the town of Blue River. Ted Engstrom, owner of Sunday Guitars is asking for donations that they’ll be delivering to the displaced community. They are asking for items like shovels, power tools, tents, tarps, chainsaws, wheel barrows and rain gear. Donations can be dropped off at the Sunday Guitars store Friday before dark. The store is located in at 759 Northeast Greenwood Avenue. Special arrangements can be made for pickup for multiple or larger items. To schedule a pick-up call 541-323-2332.



BEND, OR -- The Public Health Director briefed Deschutes County Commissioners yesterday about the spread of COVID-19. Nahad Sadr-Azodi focused on contact tracing and noted one person was not truthful and denied working while sick. He says two other co-workers got sick and spread the virus to at least 10 more people and in turn that exposed 7 more people. Zadr-Azodi says the virus spread could have been stopped before it started had the worker not gone to the job or, admitted the truth when contacted by a tracer. 



PRINEVILLE, OR  -- Crook County Schools have asked the state to declare their 4th through 12th grade classes as a Pilot Program to get kids back in the classroom. Spokesman Jason Carr says the request was made because Crook county is close to state metrics, but one virus case tips the balance. He says the 600 students in K-3 classes have been in classrooms since day one but not one case has been tied to the schools. Carr says Superintendent Doctor Sara Johnson sent an email to state education director Colt Gill yesterday. He says Gill responded and said he would put together a team to review the request.

 



BEND, OR -- A 28-year-old Bend man has been arrested in connection with a stabbing that took place a week-and-a-half ago. On Sunday, September 6th, Bend Police were called to the Days Inn Motel on NE 3rd Street.  Upon arriving they found an 18-year-old man had a life-threatening injury after being stabbed in the chest.  The suspect was identified as Jonathan Roberson who had fled the scene in a black Toyota Camry.  Law enforcement has been looking for him ever since.  Last Friday, an office noticed the car around Country Club Drive and Murphy Road. Roberson was inside and was arrested.  Other evidence pertaining to the stabbing was collected at the scene and Roberson was jailed on assault charges.

 



Oregon reports 195 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 2 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed two more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 521, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 195 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 29,850.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (10), Clatsop (2), Coos (2), Deschutes (4), Douglas (2), Hood River (1), Jackson (15), Jefferson (5), Klamath (14), Lane (15), Linn (1), Malheur (17), Marion (23), Multnomah (32), Polk (3), Umatilla (2), Union (1), Wallowa (6), Wasco (2), Washington (33) and Yamhill (4).

Oregon’s 520th COVID-19 death is a 70-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on July 9 and died on Sept. 8 at OHSU. He did not have underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 521st COVID-19 death is a 79-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Aug. 4 and died on Sept. 10 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.


OHA announces new COVID-19 wastewater monitoring project

OHA today announced it had launched a statewide COVID-19 wastewater monitoring project to study the presence of the SARS-CoV-2 virus in more than 40 small- to medium-sized communities around the state. The project, which will include weekly wastewater testing over the next 30 months, will enable epidemiologists to better understand the circulation of COVID-19 in some of Oregon’s communities. It will serve as an “early warning” system to tell if COVID-19 is spreading silently in communities.

“This program holds promise to help us monitor COVID-19 in our communities,” said Melissa Sutton MD, MPH, Medical Director for Respiratory Viral Pathogens at OHA and a principal investigator for the wastewater study. “We look forward to our partnership with local communities and researchers. Together we hope to better understand the spread of COVID-19 in Oregon.”

Much of the work will be carried out by Oregon State University researchers, along with local partners. Funding for this program comes from the CDC.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



IRS announces tax relief for Oregon Wildfires and straight-line winds victims

 

OR-2020-03

 

Oregon — Victims of Oregon wildfires and straight-line winds that began Sept. 7 now have until Jan. 15, 2021, to file various individual and business tax returns and make tax payments, the Internal Revenue Service announced today.

 

Following the recent disaster declaration for individual assistance issued by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the IRS announced today that affected taxpayers in certain areas will receive tax relief.

 

Individuals and households who reside or have a business in Clackamas, Douglas, Jackson, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn and Marion counties qualify for tax relief. Taxpayers in localities added later to the disaster area will automatically receive the same filing and payment relief.

 

The declaration permits the IRS to postpone certain tax-filing and tax-payment deadlines for taxpayers who reside or have a business in the disaster area. For instance, certain deadlines falling on or after Sept. 7, 2020, and before Jan. 15, 2021, are postponed through Jan. 15, 2021. This includes individual and business tax filers that had a valid extension to file their 2019 return due to run out on Oct. 15, 2020.   

 

The Jan. 15, 2021 deadline applies to the third quarter estimated tax payment due on Sept. 15, 2020. It also applies to the quarterly payroll and excise tax returns normally due on Nov. 2, 2020. In addition, it applies to tax-exempt organizations, operating on a calendar-year basis, that had a valid extension due to run out on Nov. 16, 2020. In addition, penalties on deposits due on or after Sept. 7, 2020 and before Sept. 22, 2020, will be abated as long as the tax deposits were made by Sept. 22, 2020.

 

If an affected taxpayer receives a late filing or late payment penalty notice from the IRS that has an original or extended filing, payment or deposit due date that falls within the postponement period, the taxpayer should call the telephone number on the notice to have the IRS abate the penalty. For information on services currently available, visit the IRS operations and services page at IRS.gov/Coronavirus.

 

The IRS automatically identifies taxpayers located in the covered disaster area and applies filing and payment relief. But affected taxpayers who reside or have a business located outside the covered disaster area should call the IRS disaster hotline at 866-562-5227 to request this tax relief.

 

Covered Disaster Area

The localities listed above constitute a covered disaster area for purposes of Treas. Reg. §301.7508A-1(d)(2) and are entitled to the relief detailed below.

 

Affected Taxpayers

Taxpayers considered to be affected taxpayers eligible for the postponement of time to file returns, pay taxes and perform other time-sensitive acts are those taxpayers listed in Treas. Reg. § 301.7508A-1(d)(1), and include individuals who live, and businesses (including tax-exempt organizations) whose principal place of business is located, in the covered disaster area. Taxpayers not in the covered disaster area, but whose records necessary to meet a deadline listed in Treas. Reg. § 301.7508A-1(c) are in the covered disaster area, are also entitled to relief. In addition, all relief workers affiliated with a recognized government or philanthropic organization assisting in the relief activities in the covered disaster area and any individual visiting the covered disaster area who was killed or injured as a result of the disaster are entitled to relief.

 

Under section 7508A, the IRS gives affected taxpayers until Jan. 15, 2021, to file most tax returns (including individual, corporate, and estate and trust income tax returns; partnership returns, S corporation returns, and trust returns; estate, gift, and generation-skipping transfer tax returns; annual information returns of tax-exempt organizations; and employment and certain excise tax returns), that have either an original or extended due date occurring on or after Sept. 7, 2020, and before Jan. 15, 2021.

 

Affected taxpayers that have an estimated income tax payment originally due on or after Sept. 7, 2020, and before Jan. 15, 2021, are postponed through Jan. 15, 2021, will not be subject to penalties for failure to pay estimated tax installments as long as such payments are paid on or before Jan. 15, 2021.

 

The IRS also gives affected taxpayers until Jan. 15, 2021 to perform other time-sensitive actions described in Treas. Reg. § 301.7508A-1(c)(1) and Rev. Proc. 2018-58, 2018-50 IRB 990 (Dec. 10, 2018), that are due to be performed on or after Sept. 7, 2020, and before Jan. 15, 2021.

 

This relief also includes the filing of Form 5500 series returns that were required to be filed on or after Sept. 7, 2020, and before Jan. 15, 2021, are postponed through Jan. 15, 2021, in the manner described in section 8 of Rev. Proc. 2018-58. The relief described in section 17 of Rev. Proc. 2018-58, pertaining to like-kind exchanges of property, also applies to certain taxpayers who are not otherwise affected taxpayers and may include acts required to be performed before or after the period above.

 

Unless an act is specifically listed in Rev. Proc. 2018-58, the postponement of time to file and pay does not apply to information returns in the W-2, 1094, 1095, 1097, 1098 or 1099 series; to Forms 1042-S, 3921, 3922 or 8027; or to employment and excise tax deposits. However, penalties on deposits due on or after Sept. 7, 2020, and before Sept. 22, 2020, will be abated as long as the tax deposits were made by Sept. 22, 2020.

 

Casualty Losses

Affected taxpayers in a federally declared disaster area have the option of claiming disaster-related casualty losses on their federal income tax return for either the year in which the event occurred, or the prior year. See Publication 547 for details.

 

Individuals may deduct personal property losses that are not covered by insurance or other reimbursements. For details, see Form 4684, Casualties and Thefts and its Instructions.

 

Affected taxpayers claiming the disaster loss on a 2019 or 2020 return should put the Disaster Designation, “Oregon - Wildfires and Straight-line Winds,” in bold letters at the top of the form. Be sure to include the disaster declaration number, FEMA 4562, on any return. See Publication 547 for details.

 

Other Relief

The IRS will waive the usual fees and requests for copies of previously filed tax returns for affected taxpayers. Taxpayers should put the assigned Disaster Designation “Oregon - Wildfires and Straight-line Winds,” in bold letters at the top of Form 4506, Request for Copy of Tax Return, or Form 4506-T, Request for Transcript of Tax Return, as appropriate, and submit it to the IRS.

 

Affected taxpayers who are contacted by the IRS on a collection or examination matter should explain how the disaster impacts them so that the IRS can provide appropriate consideration to their case. Taxpayers may download forms and publications from the official IRS website, IRS.gov.

 



Peter Murphy at ODOT tells KBND News that two major closures are in place for people heading out of Central Oregon. Highway 22 to Salem and Highway 126 to Springfield/Eugene area are closed. Murphy says they aren’t in a position to assess damage on several highways that lead to the valley. However, he adds that Highway 20 to Albany and Highway 26 over Mount Hood are open.



BEND, OR -- Yesterday, the Bend LaPine School Board decided to allow K-3 students back to the classroom on a limited basis beginning October fifth.  Central Oregon Daily reports the schedule will include 3 days of distance learning and two full days in class with teachers each week. To reduce class size and maximize social distancing at schools, students will be split into two groups based on last names. To see the full story go herehttps://centraloregondaily.com/bend-la-pine-to-begin-limited-in-person-classes-oct-5th/



The Beachie Creek Fire Information Officer Stefan Myers says the fIre is at 190-thousand acres and 20-per cent contained. He says the weather has been favorable although there has been too much smoke for aircraft to help fight the blaze Myers says Beachie Creek has merged with a portion of the Lionshead Fire near Detroit. He says more personnel have been arriving to help and a Type 1 Incident Management Team is coming in to take over from a Type 2 Team.  



The Bend, Redmond and Prineville DMV offices closed yesterday due to hazardous air quality. If you have an appointment at DMV this week or next, check your office’s status at Oregon-DMV-dot-com.  The agency says they may not reopen until next week and even when they do so, may not be fully staffed. The Oregon Department of Revenue building in Salem and all it’s regional field offices will be closed to the general public beginning today.  They plan to reopen on Monday.



Firefighters are making progress battling the Lionshead Fire which is at almost 184-thousand acres and 10-per cent contained. Fire Information Officer Amy Lynn says the weather hasn’t been that bad but the smoke creates challenges. She says they have aircraft to fight the fire but the smoke is so heavy they haven’t been able to get up in the air. Lynn says they are also managing and coordinating with the Warm Springs TrIbes to increase fire containment lines on the reservation. She says they are also coordinating with the Riverside Fire managers.



                                Redmond’s Annual Bicycle and Pedestrian Count Event - CANCELLED

           

REDMOND, OREGON –Due to the forecasted unhealthy air quality conditions, the City of Redmond’s Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee (BPAC) has cancelled their annual bicycle and pedestrian count.  The event was schedule for this Thursday, September 17, from 3:30-5:30 p.m. and again on Saturday, September 19, from Noon to 2:00 p.m.

 

Thank you to all the volunteers who signed-up to participate, we look forward to seeing you next year.

 

The purpose of the BPAC is to increase pedestrian utility and bicycle ridership in Redmond – to encourage more people to bike and walk around Redmond as a means of exercise, sustainability and community. BPAC represents all bicycle and pedestrian users in Redmond, both current and future by advocating for the development of additional bike and pedestrian facilities that are user friendly, inviting and compelling, reviewing transportation projects from the viewpoint of bicycle and pedestrian users and spearheading encouragement and educational activities.

####

 



Oregon reports 184 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 8 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed eight more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 519, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 184 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 29,662.

The new cases are in the following counties: Clackamas (11), Clatsop (1), Columbia (1), Crook (1), Deschutes (2), Douglas (1), Gilliam (2), Jackson (10), Jefferson (3), Josephine (2), Klamath (3), Lane (9), Linn (6), Malheur (25), Marion (31), Morrow (3), Multnomah (35), Polk (2), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (4), Union (1), Washington (25), and Yamhill (5).

Oregon’s 512th COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old woman in Washington County who died on Sept. 1, at Tuality Healthcare. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death.

Oregon’s 513th COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old woman in Malheur County who tested positive on Sept. 7 and died on Sept. 11, at St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Idaho. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 514th COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Aug. 30 and died on Sept. 14, at Legacy Mt. Hood Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 515th COVID-19 death is a 66-year-old woman in Morrow County who tested positive on Aug.11 and died on Sept. 13, at OHSU. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 516th COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on July 31 and died on Sept. 9, in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 517th COVID-19 death is a 58-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Aug. 25 and died on Sept. 11, at Legacy Mt. Hood Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 518th COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Aug. 26 and died on Sept. 11, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 519th COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on Aug. 26 and died on Sept.10, at Providence Portland Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

TESTING NOTE: Wildfires and hazardous air conditions have affected COVID-19 testing in Oregon. The Oregon State Public Health Laboratory (OSPHL) is closed again today, Tuesday, Sept. 15 due to indoor air safety issues.

Most specimens that the OSPHL cannot process are being re-routed to commercial laboratories. As such OHA does not anticipate a large backlog of tests due to OSPHL’s closure.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



MADRAS, OR -- A Madras man has been charged with attempted murder after being arrested for attempted assault in the first degree over the weekend. Daniel Solis, with an already extensive criminal record at the age of 22, was taken into custody during a traffic stop after police suspected his involvement in a shooting. Solis led Madras Police on a high-risk vehicle pursuit after firing a gun at an unoccupied vehicle and near residents of the 500 block of Southwest Marshall Street. He is now lodged at Jefferson county jail.



BEND, OR -- Opposing views are causing rifts in our country leading to an increase in criminal activity. Deschutes County District Attorney John Hummel says a possible solution could be a concept called “restorative justice.” He says if a victim and offender can come together and reach resolution, then our community could too. Hummel says we should apply this idea towards how people treat each other.

 

 



Smoke levels have been fluctuating between unhealthy to hazardous for the state of Oregon. Morgan Emerson at Deschutes Health Services says cloth masks won’t protect you from harmful smoke particles. She recommends a N95 respirator under your cloth mask. Emerson adds that avoiding outdoor activities, using a HEPA filter, and leaving the area will give you temporary relief from the smoke. If you are considering leaving the area, be advised that several highways and roads are closed. It’s recommended to check TripCheck.com before traveling.

 



The Beachie Creek Fire is over 190-thousand acres and is 15% contained. Public Information Officer StefanMyers says this is because the safety of residents is most important. He also says the weather has been favorable allowing personnel to get the fire suppressed. The Lionshead Fire has burned more than 168-thousand acres and destroyed 264 homes. The Almeda Drive fire in southern Oregon is 100% contained but has destroyed 600 residences.



Oregon PUC Issues Statement IOn Wildfires*UPDATE* STATEMENT FROM THE OREGON PUBLIC UTILITY COMMISSION

 

News Release from Oregon Public Utility Commission
Posted on FlashAlert: September 11th, 2020 2:20 PM

 **UPDATE**

The PUC’s original statement explained the status of the PUC’s information regarding the investor-owned utilities that it regulates. By addressing only our information regarding investor-owned utilities, and not Oregon’s consumer-owned utilities, the PUC did not intend to imply that it had different information about consumer-owned utilities’ relationship to wildfires. The PUC clarifies that it also has no information attributing any specific wildfire to any of Oregon’s consumer-owned utilities, and has updated the bolded quotation below to reflect this. Results of full investigations are needed to determine whether power lines were the primary ignition of any specific wildfire and, if so, which ones.

****

Statement

“On behalf of the PUC, I extend our condolences to all our communities affected by this wildfire tragedy,” said Oregon Public Utility Commission (PUC) Chair Megan Decker. “The PUC is actively working to support first responders and firefighters who are working to ensure the safety of Oregonians, as well as our utility service providers working to restore essential services to Oregonians where it is safe to do so.”

As Oregon continues to prioritize efforts on life safety and fire containment, initial reports from fire managers have linked electric utility power lines to some of the fires burning in Oregon. The PUC regulates investor-owned electric utilities, such as Portland General Electric and Pacific Power. Thirty-eight consumer-owned electric utilities also provide electric service in the state. 

Downed power lines can be a source of ignition and will be examined in the formal investigations that are yet to come.  "At this point the PUC has no information attributing any specific wildfire to any specific Oregon utility," said PUC Chair Megan Decker. "As with every major fire, full investigations will deliver the facts that we need to determine root causes, including information about whether utility lines were a primary ignition source. Accurate, objectively determined facts are what we need to keep Oregonians safe from rapidly evolving fire threats in a changing climate."

In addition to reviewing the results of fire investigations conducted by others, which ultimately will determine the cause of each wildfire, the PUC is committed to rapidly incorporating any lessons that may be learned from this unprecedented weather event into our ongoing work on utility wildfire mitigation in preparation for future extreme weather events.

# # #



SHEPHERD'S HOUSE SEEKING PUBLIC HELP

Shepherds House is responding to the critical needs of the homeless and others impacted by the recent Oregon fires.  They are in need of N95 masks for those vulnerable populations living outside. They are also collecting gift cards from Fred Myer and monetary donations to assist those who are living in temporary shelters as a result of the recent wild fires.  Your support is critical and greatly appreciated.  Let’s be there for those who are suffering the most.

 

Drop off donations, M-S 9 am to 4 pm at:

1854 NE Division Street

Bend, OR 97701

 

Monetary donations securely online at:

https://shepherdshouseministries.org/donate/

To: “Where it is most needed”

 



CET Bend Fixed-Route services to end at 2 pm on Friday (9/11) and transition to Dial-A-Ride due to hazardous air quality and low ridership

 

September 11, 2020 Bend, ORE — Cascades East Transit (CET) Bend Fixed-Route services will end at 2 pm on Friday (9/11) and transition to a reservation-based Bend Dial-A-Ride service due to hazardous air quality and low ridership. Regional Community Connector and Dial-A-Ride services will continue to operate as scheduled. Riders can call 541-385-8680 to schedule rides (upon availability) within Bend on Friday, 9/11, as the Bend Dial-A-Ride service will be available to the general public. Riders are encouraged to check CET's website at www.CascadesEastTransit.com or visit CET’s social media pages for service updates, as smoky conditions will likely persist through early next week. All CET weekend services are currently suspended until further notice.

Our hearts go out to all those who continue to be affected by the devastating wildfires and we are hopeful that changing weather patterns will help firefighters gain control of the fires to prevent further damage and improve air quality.

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ODOT NEWS RELEASE: NORTH UMPQUA HIGHWAY WILL REMAIN CLOSED AT LEAST A WEEK (PHOTO)

 

News Release from ODOT: SW Oregon
Posted on FlashAlert: September 11th, 2020 1:04 PM

OR138E - Tree in highway east of Susan Creek (Sept. 10)

Downloadable file: OR138E - Tree in highway east of Susan Creek (Sept. 10)
Downloadable file: OR138E - Damaged utility pole near Susan Creek (Sept. 10)
Downloadable file: OR138E - Debris blocking highway near Susan Creek (Sept. 10)
Downloadable file: OR138E - Guardrail posts destroyed near Susan Creek (Thursday, Sept. 10)
Downloadable file: OR138E - Damaged road sign at Susan Creek (Sept. 10)

GLIDE – Oregon 138E (North Umpqua Highway) is expected to remain closed between Glide and U.S. 97 for at least a week due to hazardous conditions related to heavy winds and local wildfires.

Over the past three days, the Archie Creek Fire has expanded to more than 115,000 acres, mostly to the north of the North Umpqua River. The highway is also located north of the river. A second fire is located near Diamond Lake.

Trees, rocks and debris have fallen into the roadway in several locations, leaving some areas inaccessible. Several sections of guardrail have been destroyed by the fire. Signs and utility poles have also been destroyed. More than a hundred trees are in danger of collapsing onto the roadway. The fire has weakened slopes, posing a risk of landslides throughout the coming fall and winter. Bridges will need to be inspected for damage.

ODOT is developing short- and long-term plans to address these hazards.

Over the next several days, ODOT will monitor the fire and work with emergency services so that fire crews can maintain access to the area.

As the fire moves away from the highway, ODOT will remove debris from the roadway in an effort to open the highway to at least a single lane of traffic. This may involve flaggers and pilot cars.

The third phase will likely begin later this month, when the fire is more contained, and continue for several weeks or months. This will involve removing hazard trees and addressing weakened slopes. We anticipate frequent lane closures throughout the fall. Up-to-date information will be posted on www.TripCheck.com.

Emergency responders and evacuees have priority during this emergency. Other motorists are advised to avoid the area. Do not put yourself at risk by using forest roads to get around fire closures.

 

##ODOT##



Oregon reports 215 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 2 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed two more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 499, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 215 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 28,865.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (2), Benton (6), Clackamas (14), Columbia (1), Coos (2), Curry (1), Deschutes (3), Douglas (1), Jackson (7), Jefferson (3), Klamath (1), Lane (8), Linn (3), Malheur (27), Marion (36), Morrow (2), Multnomah (59), Polk (5), Umatilla (9), Union (2), Wasco (2), Washington (17), and Yamhill (4).

Oregon’s 498th COVID-19 death is a 64-year-old man in Jefferson County who tested positive on Aug. 5 and died on Sept. 10 at St. Charles Medical Center Bend. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 499th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Aug. 24 and died on Sept. 1 at Adventist Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Stay safe from wildfire smoke

With wildfire smoke creating unsafe air quality conditions, please remember to follow these tips to protect yourself and your family:

  • Stay indoors as much as possible.
  • Limit activity outdoors.
  • If you have heart or lung disease or respiratory illnesses such as asthma, follow your health care provider’s advice about prevention and treatment of symptoms.
  • Reduce other sources of smoke, such as cigarette smoking and wood-burning stoves, for example.
  • Check current air quality conditions. Go to http://oregonsmoke.blogspot.com/ to find the current air quality and wildfire smoke resources.
  • Stay hydrated. Drink plenty of water.
  • Remember that cloth masks and face coverings do not protect you from wildfire smoke, they do offer protection against COVID-19. N95 respirators may offer some protection if properly fit tested and worn. Otherwise, they may create a false sense of security. N95s are not available in children’s sizes.
  • Learn more about the dangers of wildfire smoke and how you can stay safe by visiting healthoregon.org/wildfires.

Emergency Preparedness and prescriptions

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



Wildfire Smoke and Animals Safety Precautions

 

Bend, OR (September 11, 2020) – The Humane Society of Central Oregon wants to remind people that unhealthy air quality also applies to animals. If you are experiencing breathing issues, scratchy eyes and throat, your body is reacting to toxins in the smoke. This smoke also affects pets, horses, livestock and wildlife in similar ways. Animals that have cardiovascular or respiratory disease are most vulnerable during poor air quality and should be monitored.

 

Keep your pets indoors and limit time outside. The Humane Society of Central Oregon rents dog crates for $5 a month if your dog is not fully housetrained and containment will help.

 

The Humane Society of Central Oregon and the American Veterinary Medical Association offers these tips:

Look for the following signs of possible smoke or dust irritation in animals. If your animal is experiencing any of these signs, please consult your veterinarian.

  • Coughing or gagging
  • Difficulty breathing, including open mouth breathing and increased noise when breathing
  • Eye irritation and excessive watering
  • Inflammation of throat or mouth
  • Nasal discharge
  • Asthma-like symptoms
  • Increased breathing rate
  • Fatigue or weakness
  • Disorientation or stumbling
  • Reduced appetite and/or thirst
  •  

Tips to Protect Pets

  • Keep pets indoors as much as possible, and keep your windows shut.
  • Birds are particularly susceptible and should not be allowed outside when smoke or particulate matter are present.
  • Let dogs and cats outside only for brief bathroom breaks if air quality alerts are in effect.
  • Avoid intense outdoor exercise during periods of poor air quality. Exercise pets when dust and smoke has settled.
  • Have a pet evacuation kit ready, and include your animals in your disaster preparedness planning.
  •  

Tips to Protect Livestock

  • Limit exercise when smoke is visible. Especially don’t require animals to perform activities that substantively increase airflow into and out of the lungs.
  • Provide plenty of fresh water near feeding areas.
  • Limit dust exposure by feeding low-dust or dust-free feeds and sprinkling or misting the livestock holding area.
  • Plan to give livestock 4 to 6 weeks to recuperate after the air quality returns to normal. Attempting to handle, move, or transport livestock may delay healing and compromise your animals’ performance.

 



Transportation:

ODOT: SW Oregon:
11 a.m. Keep highways/roads clear for first responders and evacuees.
Almeda Fire area: Oregon 99 remains closed to the public between north Ashland (South Valley View Drive) and south Medford (South Stage Road) for fire operations. This includes the cities of Talent and Phoenix. I-5 Talent Exit 21 remains closed. I-5 Phoenix Exit 24 is closed to the west, but open to the east.
No pedestrians will be allowed to cross I-5 Exit 24 Phoenix.
*Obenchain Fire area: All of Oregon 62 north of Oregon 234 north is closed. Crater Lake National Park is closed. This closure includes OR 62 north and east from U.S. 97.
Oregon 140 east of White City is being used as evacuation routes. Sections of it are in the Level 3 GO. Highway status may change.
*Archie Fire & Diamond Lake area fires: Oregon 138E remains closed from Glide east to the junction of U.S. 97.
*Slater Fire in Illinois Valley: U.S. 199 (Redwood Highway) remains closed from the OR/Cal border north to near Cave Junction. (Also closed in California)
Do not put yourself at risk by using forest roads to get around fire closure areas.

Please respect the closure areas. Do not drive through or around closure points.



FBI RELEASES STATEMENT ON MISINFORMATION RELATED TO WILDFIRES (PHOTO)

News Release from FBI - Oregon

FBI Portland and local law enforcement agencies have been receiving reports that extremists are responsible for setting wildfires in Oregon. With our state and local partners, the FBI has investigated several such reports and found them to be untrue. Conspiracy theories and misinformation take valuable resources away local fire and police agencies working around the clock to bring these fires under control. Please help our entire community by only sharing validated information from official sources. 

###

 



 

Start Date:  8/16/2020 

Approx. Size: est. 136,265 ac. 

Resources on the Fire: 

Cooperating Agencies: 

Cause: Lightning 

Containment: 5%                       

48 Crews 

Marion Co. Sheriff 

Incident Commander: 

Total Personnel: 1093 

63 Engines 

Linn Co. Sheriff 

Noel Livingston  

Pacific Northwest Team 3 

 

Approx. Distance: 

 20 miles west of Warm Springs 

 

10  Dozers 

51 Water Tenders 

11 Helicopters  

Jefferson Co. Sheriff 

Deschutes Co. Sheriff 

 

Lionshead Fire Update – Friday, September 11, 2020 – 9:00 a.m.

 

Weather and Fire Behavior: West to northwest winds are expected today, 6-10 mph with gust up to 15 mph.  The easterly transport winds are carrying the smoke to Central and Eastern Oregon, not only from The Lionshead Fire but also from The Beachie Creek and Riverside Fires. Temperatures will be in the mid 70-80’s with humidity in the teens on the easterly portion of the fire and west of the crest of the cascades in the lower 20’s.  

 

Current Situation: West of the cascades The Lionshead Fire continues to grow, challenging firefighters with complex terrain and difficult access. This makes finding potential locations for containment lines difficult, but also creates a safety hazard due to not having dependable communications. Yesterday a helitack crew was able to secure a lookout and communication tower to the south of the burned area, placing an additional radio repeater. This will give fire crews dependable communications for safer firefighting efforts. A structure task force continued to work in the area of Idanha and Detroit securing structures and infrastructure. Working with local firefighting resources and the National Guard infrared aircraft through the dense smoke. Crews continue to look for access to the north side of the fires edge to secure infrastructure and determine strategies for suppression. 

Crews working the eastern side of The Lionshead Fire located on the Warm Springs Reservation, continued to make great progress widening containment lines with strategic firing operations yesterday. Securing the eastern edges of the fire is critical in long term containment of the fire with the changing of the wind pattern to an easterly flow.  

 

Today’s Activities: On the west side of the fire the structure task force will continue to work on the southwestern edge of the fire, providing protection to infrastructures. Firefighters will also continue to scout for possible southern containment locations along established road systems. On the north side of the fire, firefighters will continue to work their way through the area, although active fire and hazards in the burned area make accessing infrastructure treacherous.  

On the eastern side of the crest of the cascades on the Warm Springs Reservation, firefighters will continue hardening containment, keeping close watch on the fire as the winds return to the westerly flow. Handline and dozer line will continue to be put in where needed, laying hose lays and mopping up areas along control lines that have heat. Crews will watch for any spot fires that may come from the change in winds or fire growth outside the fire area.  

Air resources are available to help the firefighters on the ground but will be dependent on visibility due to smoke.  

 

Evacuations: Please monitor the local area sheriff’s department websites and Facebook for updates. (Deschutes, Jefferson, Wasco, Linn, and Marion counties) The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has created an interactive database to help provide the most up to date information on evacuation statewide. https://www.oregon.gov/oem/emops/Pages/RAPTOR.aspx 

 

Closures: For public and firefighter safety, roads and trails on the southwest portion of the Warm Springs Reservation near the fires are closed to the public. Forest closures are in place for Deschutes, Mt. Hood and Willamette National Forests.   Deschutes NF Alerts     Willamette NF Alerts     Mt. Hood NF Alerts     



Beachie Creek Fire Update for Friday September 11, 2020 

 

Salem, Ore. – Firefighters spent yesterday morning mopping up areas along the southern fire front along the Highway 22 corridor. Crews were successful in establishing anchor points in the Mehama and Lyons area where significantly less fire growth occurred. Crews then transition to doing structure protection in Silver Falls State Park and the areas of Drake’s Crossing and Scott’s Mills. Structural protection and assessment were also done along the Abiqua drainage while additional crews established anchor points to limit rapid fire spread. As the fire continued north, work was performed along the northwest and northern fire fronts. Extremely dry condition fueled continued growth toward the Riverside Fire. 

 

Fire Officials continue to work closely with the Marion County Sheriff’s Office, ODOT and the Oregon State Police to coordinate recovery efforts along the Santiam Canyon. Currently 13,764 structures are at Level 3 evacuations and another 18,528 homes are under in level 2 evacuations.  

 

It is imperative to protect first responders and communities in the path of the fire that everyone heeds fire and law enforcement road closures and evacuations. Anyone who enters the fire perimeter is jeopardizing firefighting and rescue operations, increasing the time it will take to return residents to their communities and putting lives at risk. 

 

WEATHER:  The strong high pressure over the region for the past several days will weaken today and continue into the weekend.  Winds should also begin to fall below critical thresholds elsewhere. Onshore flow will begin today and continue through the weekend. Temperatures are expected to reach 83-88 degrees today. These weather conditions are generally excepted to improve firefighting conditions as crews work to make progress on the fire. 

 

SAFETY: Members of the public are encouraged to heed local evacuation orders issued by the county sheriff’s office and emergency notification systems. Know each Ready, Set, Go levels and make appropriate preparations. READY your belongings; SET your things at the door or prepack them in your car; GO Leave immediately. 

 

SMOKE:  Smoke is expected to remain heavy throughout the area for the next several days. Individuals with respiratory issues may find themselves affected by the intense smoke. Smoke levels are fluctuating between unhealthy for sensitive groups (orange) and hazardous (maroon) in these areas. Areas closest to fires - near Detroit, Florence, Chiloquin and Eugene - are having the worst smoke impacts. Smoke levels can change rapidly depending on weather. Check current conditions on DEQ's Air Quality Index or by downloading the free OregonAIR app on your smartphone. 

 

CLOSURES: Willamette National Forest roads, trails, and lands around the fire area are closed. View the official order (Order 06-18-04-20-13) or go to InciWeb (link below) for a list and map of the closed roads, trails, and recreation sites. 

 

Public information: 

Facebook: facebook.com/BeachieCreek

 

E-mail: BeachieCreek@gmail.com

Inciweb 

https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/7001/ 

 

Oregon Smoke Blog http://oregonsmoke.blogspot.com/p/air-quality-now.html 



Central Oregon Emergency Information Network

 

Three very important resources as Oregon faces significant wildfires this week.

1)

TripCheck.com

has a current map of highway closures and delays. https://www.tripcheck.com

2) InciWeb has details on each large fire, contact information for the fire and the latest evacuation/closure information. https://inciweb.nwcg.gov

3)

Red Cross Cascades Region

can provide shelter information and resources for evacuees and people trying to connect with loved ones. https://www.redcross.org/local/oregon.html

Finally, we strongly encourage you to sign up for emergency alerts with your County Sheriff or Emergency Manager to stay up-to-date on evacuation levels and any fire information they may share.

Stay safe and be well.



Air Quality Alert

ORC013-017-021-023-031-049-055-059-061-063-065-069-141815-
Crook-Deschutes-Gilliam-Grant-Jefferson-Morrow-Sherman-Umatilla-
Union-Wallowa-Wasco-Wheeler-
Including the cities of Prineville, Post, Paulina, Bend, Redmond,
Sunriver, Sisters, La Pine, Brothers, Condon, Lonerock, Arlington,
John Day, Monument, Dayville, Long Creek, Seneca, Madras,
Warm Springs, Culver, Boardman, Heppner, Lexington, Ione, Irrigon,
Wasco, Moro, Grass Valley, Hermiston, Milton-Freewater, Pendleton,
Athena, Pilot Rock, Stanfield, Umatilla, Ukiah, Helix, La Grande,
Elgin, Union, North Powder, Enterprise, Joseph, Wallowa..Imnaha,
Troy, Lostine, The Dalles, Maupin, Shaniko, Tygh Valley, Fossil,
Spray, and Mitchell
134 PM PDT Thu Sep 10 2020

...AIR QUALITY ADVISORY IN EFFECT UNTIL NOON PDT MONDAY...

Oregon Department of Environmental Quality has issued an Air Quality
Advisory...in effect until noon PDT Monday.

A Smoke Air Quality Advisory has been issued. Wildfires burning in
the region combined with forecasted conditions will cause air
quality to reach unhealthy to hazardous levels. When smoke levels
are hazardous everyone needs to take steps to protect themselves.

Pollutants in smoke can cause burning eyes...runny nose...aggravate
heart and lung diseases...and aggravate other serious health
problems.

Protect yourself when smoke levels are high:

* Avoid outdoor activities and stay inside if possible. Keep
      windows and doors closed.

* Be aware of smoke in your area and avoid places with the highest
      levels.

* Use high efficiency particulate (HEPA) air filters.

* If you have heart disease, lung disease, or asthma, follow your
      health care provider`s advice.

* Consider leaving the area if smoke levels are hazardous and you
      have heart disease, asthma or other respiratory conditions.

For additional information...please visit the web site at
https://www.oregon.gov/deq or oregonsmoke.blogspot.com or download
the free OregonAIR app on your smartphone.

$$




Deschutes County health officials urging parents to make sure they get their kids immunization records up to date. The Deschutes County Communicable Disease Program Manager, Jill Johnson says Pertussis or Whooping Cough immunizations are particularly important because the disease is so dangerous for infants. Johnson also reminds parents, the T-dap booster shot is required for all 7th graders. Immunizations available at School Health Centers as well as pharmacies and the county health department



CRATER LAKE PARK, OR -- Crater Lake National Park has issued a Level 1 “Be Ready” Evacuation Notice for visitors and residents. There is no fire in the park at this time. The evacuation notice is issued due to fire danger being extremely high, very low humidity and very dry conditions. Firefighting resources are stretched thin in Oregon and should a fire start, outside resources may be difficult to obtain. Everyone is asked to check the Crater Lake Park website, Facebook or Twitter for current status and updates.



Three teenagers, 15-year-old Shiloh Binder, his 17 year old sister Marah and a friend 17 year old Caden Bolic were hiking the Pacific Crest Trail this summer. They were told by a man his partner had a broken leg. Marah Binder and Caden Bolic hiked to the man’s location and gave first aid. Shilo Binder hiked and ran 17 miles to stay in contact with Search and Rescue who reached the injured man the next morning who was airlifted to a hospital.  Shiloh and Marah Binder and Caden Bolic will receive the National President of the American Legion Auxiliary Award at today’s 9-11 Event in Brooks Park. 

 



A 28-year-old Bend man will spend 18-months in prison for placing a hoax bomb at the Deschutes County Courthouse in July 2019. Jonathan Tyler Allen will also spend 3 years on supervised release. He must also pay more than 43-thousand dollars in restitution to the Circuit Court, the D-A’s Office, First Interstate Bank and Bend Fire & Rescue. An alleged co-conspirator in the hoax, 31-year-old Kellie Cameron has pleaded not guilty and is awaiting federal trial.



The Lionshead Fire has burned almost 123-thousand acres and is 5-per cent contained. Winds shifting from the East to the Northwest are bringing smoke into Central and Eastern Oregon through the weekend. The west edge of Lionshead Fire has now merged with the Beachie Creek Fire near Detroit Lake. Beachie Creek is over 185-thousand acres with zero containment.   In Lane County, along the McKenzie River corridor, the Holiday Farm Fire has burned nearly 145,000 acres and is zero-percent contained. The Riverside Fire in Clackamas County is nearly 121-thousand acres large with zero containment and the Archie Creek Fire near Roseburg is nearly 108-thousand acres large.  All tolled there are 38 active fires in the state and more than 805 thousand acres burned so far.



NEWS RELEASE
Governor Kate Brown Orders Flags Lowered to Half-Staff in Remembrance of Sept. 11, 2001

 
 

(Salem, OR) — Governor Kate Brown ordered flags at all public institutions throughout Oregon to be flown at half-staff from sunrise to sunset on Friday, Sept. 11 for Patriot Day.

The full Presidential Proclamation is available on the White House’s website.

 

###

 
 
   


 

 


Date:  09/11/20

By:  Lt. Bryan Husband, Search and Rescue Coordinator

Location:  Wickiup Reservoir

Rescued Subject:  Nicholas Casey 69 year old male, Bend, OR

 

On 09/10/20, at about 10:06pm, 9-1-1 Dispatch received a call from Nancy Capell, who reported her husband, Nicholas Casey, was overdue from a trip to Wickiup Reservoir.  Casey had taken his 14' skiff with electric trolling motor to the reservoir to fish earlier in the day.  Capell reported Casey had called her from his boat on the water at about 7:23pm, telling her he'd call when he got back to shore and had loaded up the boat on the trailer.  Capell never heard back from her husband.

Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Patrol Deputies responded to the Wickiup Reservoir area as well as initiated a cell phone ping to locate Casey.  Casey's cell phone carrier advised the phone had been turned off and phone activity from earlier in the day did not provide usefel ping information.  At about 12:03am, DCSO Patrol Deputies located Casey's vehicle and boat trailer at the Wickiup Butte boat launch, but Casey nor his boat, were there.  DCSO Patrol Deputies then requested assistance from the DCSO Search and Rescue Unit.

One DCSO Special Services Deputy and nine DCSO SAR Volunteers responded to the boat launch area to begin their search on the water.  Search teams consisted of DCSO SAR Swiftwater and Medical Team members.  Due to the reduced level of Wickiup Reservoir (approximately 3% capacity), DCSO's larger jet boats were not able to be used on this mission.  DCSO SAR Swiftwater Team members utilized their 12' Achilles raft with outboard motor to begin their search.  Conditions were extremely smoky with visibility being about 15-20'.  Sandbars and exposed stumps, due to low water levels, also caused additional challenges.

DCSO SAR Swiftwater team members located Casey in his boat at about 5:05am, a little over one mile from the boat launch.  Casey was in good condition and did not require medical attention.  Casey told rescuers that heavy smoke had blown into the area in the evening time, causing him to lose sight of landmarks.  Casey became disoriented and began traveling the opposite direction of the boat launch by accident.  As temperatures became cooler, Casey utilized his boat oars to row in an effort to stay warm.  DCSO SAR team members then towed Casey and his boat back to the boat launch.  Other than being a little cold, Casey was in good condition, refused further medical attention and was released to drive home on his own.

The Deschutes County Sheriff's Office would like to warn those considering recreating in these smoky conditions.  Visibility, as well as air quality, are poor and pose extra challenges.  Stay indoors if possible and consider additional navigation aids if having to travel in these conditions.

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is a full service agency that oversees the adult jail, provides patrol, criminal investigations, civil process and search and rescue operations. Special units include SWAT, Street Crimes, Marine Patrol, ATV Patrol, Forest Patrol, along with six K9 teams. Founded in 1916 and today led by your duly elected Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office serves the nearly 190,000 residents in Deschutes County. The agency has 230 authorized and funded personnel, which includes 187 sworn employees who provide services to the 3,055 square miles of Deschutes County.



 

The following message was sent to all families this morning:

Good morning RSD families,

Due to hazardous air quality RSD school campuses are closed and daily meal distribution will not occur today. Our school buildings exchange indoor air with outdoor air every night. Unfortunately, this has caused our school buildings to have poor indoor air quality levels.

If you have an appointment today at your student's school your school staff will be contacting you to reschedule.  

Thank you,

Redmond School District

 



FEMA Authorizes Federal Funds to Help Fight Clackamas County Complex Fire in Oregon 

 

BOTHELL, Wash. – The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has authorized the use of federal funds to help with firefighting costs for the Clackamas County Complex Fire burning in Clackamas County, Oregon. 

FEMA Region 10 Administrator Mike O’Hare determined that the fire threatened to cause such destruction as would constitute a major disaster, and on Thursday he approved the state of Oregon’s request for a federal Fire Management Assistance Grant (FMAG). 

The Clackamas County Complex Fire started on Monday, burning an unknown number of acres. At the time of the request, the fire was threatening homes in and around Clackamas County, including the cities of Molalla, Scotts Mills, Unions Mills, Colton, Redland and Logan. Evacuation notices have been issued for Clackamas County spanning to the Multnomah County border and the Portland Metropolitan Area. This fire complex consists of the North Cascade Complex Fire, the Unger Road Fire, the Whilhoit Road Fire, the Macksburg Road Fire, Dowty Road Fire, Blue Box Fire, Timothy Lake Fire, Old Cedar Fire, McGee Creek Fire, Lowe Creek Fire, Quarry Fire, Sisi Creek Fire, Hood Meadows Fire, La Dee Fire, and the Pot Creek Fire. 

The number of FMAGs approved for the state of Oregon now totals 14, most of them approved this week. 

FMAGs are provided through the President's Disaster Relief Fund and are made available by FEMA to assist in fighting fires that threaten to cause a major disaster. Eligible items can include expenses for field camps; equipment use, repair and replacement; mobilization and demobilization activities; and tools, materials and supplies. 

In addition to reimbursement funding for fighting the fire, $629,681 in mitigation assistance will be available to Oregon. The Disaster Recovery Reform Act of 2018 authorizes FEMA to provide Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) Post-Fire funds to eligible states and territories that receive Fire Management Assistance declarations and federally recognized tribes that have land burned within a designated area. 

FEMA encourages HMGP Post-Fire funds be used for the mitigation of wildfire and related hazards, such as flood or erosion. However, HMGP is available for risk reduction of any hazard. 

###.

FEMA Authorizes Federal Funds to Help Fight Two Additional Fires in Oregon 

 

BOTHELL, Wash. – The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) authorized the use of federal funds to help with firefighting costs for the Pike Road Fire in Tillamook County and the Slater Fire in Josephine County, Oregon. 

FEMA Region 10 Administrator Mike O’Hare determined that the fires threatened to cause such destruction as would constitute a major disaster, and on Thursday he approved the state of Oregon’s requests for federal Fire Management Assistance Grants (FMAG). 

The Pike Road Fire started on Tuesday, burning in excess of 220 acres of state and private land. At the time of the request, the fire was threatening over 1,355 homes in and around the communities of Bay City, Hobsonville and Idaville. Immediate threats are to Bay City, as well as the local water supply and watersheds in the surrounding hills. 

The Slater Fire started in California and crossed into Oregon on Wednesday, burning over 135,000 acres of federal and private land. At the time of the request, the fire threatening homes in and around the communities of Cave Junction, O’Brien and Kerby. The fire also threatened the Oregon Caves National Monument and Preserve, timber and national forest lands.  

The number of FMAGs approved for the state of Oregon now totals 13, most of them approved this week. 

FMAGs are provided through the President's Disaster Relief Fund and are made available by FEMA to assist in fighting fires that threaten to cause a major disaster. Eligible items can include expenses for field camps; equipment use, repair and replacement; mobilization and demobilization activities; and tools, materials and supplies. 

In addition to reimbursement funding for fighting the fire, $1,259,362 in mitigation assistance will be available to Oregon. The Disaster Recovery Reform Act of 2018 authorizes FEMA to provide Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) Post-Fire funds to eligible states and territories that receive Fire Management Assistance declarations and federally recognized tribes that have land burned within a designated area. 

FEMA encourages HMGP Post-Fire funds be used for the mitigation of wildfire and related hazards, such as flood or erosion. However, HMGP is available for risk reduction of any hazard. 

 

###

 



Oregon reports 187 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 497, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 187 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 28,654.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (4), Clackamas (12), Clatsop (3), Columbia (1), Coos (3), Deschutes (2), Hood River (1), Jackson (8), Jefferson (3), Josephine (1), Klamath (2), Lane (5), Lincoln (1), Linn (6), Malheur (16), Marion (35), Morrow (1), Multnomah (33), Polk (4), Umatilla (6), Union (3), Wasco (1), Washington (27), and Yamhill (9).

Oregon’s 495th COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Aug. 27 and died on Sept. 9, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 496th COVID-19 death is a 56-year-old man in Malheur County who tested positive on July 31 and died on Sept. 9, at St. Alphonsus Medical Center Nampa in Idaho. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 497th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Aug. 28 and died on Sept. 8, in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Wildfire Evacuation Protocol for People Quarantining or Isolating Due to COVID-19

During Oregon’s wildfires and safety evacuations, it is important to take precautions to avoid spreading COVID-19, particularly for those in isolation or quarantine due to a positive diagnosis or exposure to the virus.

The first priority in wildfire situations is responding to the evacuation and safety instructions of local and state fire officials – and heeding their warnings. Regardless of disease status, if you are asked or ordered to evacuate, you should do so. 

If you or a household member are quarantining or isolating to prevent the spread of COVID-19, please take the following precautions:

  • If ordered to evacuate, do so immediately. Follow all instructions from fire officials.
  • If you have time, reach out to your local public health authority, who should have already been in contact with you about your isolation/quarantine. They may have solutions to help you continue to isolate/quarantine if you are evacuated.
  • Should you be directed to a shelter or other evacuation space, please let officials know you are in isolation/quarantine so that they can take steps to keep you distanced from other evacuees. 
  • Wear a mask at all times when outside your home, or if you may come into contact with people who do not live with you.
  • If you are an older adult or a person with disabilities, reach out to the Aging and Disabilities Resource Connection for information about resources 1-855-ORE-ADRC(1-855-673-2372).
  • Practice physical distancing to the greatest extent possible, if you must travel outside your home for any reason, including evacuation.
  • More information about wildfire safety and your health is available on healthoregon.org/wildfires.
  • Additional resources can be found by calling 2-1-1.

COVID cases continue to drop

OHA released its weekly report today and during the week from Monday, Aug. 31, through Sunday, Sept. 6, OHA recorded 1,477 new cases of COVID-19 infection. It’s down 5 percent from the previous week and more than 30 percent since the pandemic’s peak in mid-July.

This marks the fifth consecutive weekly decline. Deaths also declined sharply during that week from 39 to 23. The percentage of positive tests also dropped from 4.4 to 4.3 percent.

The age group with the highest incidence of reported infection continues to be persons between 20 and 29 years old. Hospitalizations are highest in the older age groups and nearly half of all deaths were people 80 or older.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

#MyORHealth horizontal rule



 

Get Ready for the First Day of School

Technology training and practical tips from Bend-La Pine Schools’ educators

 

The first day of school is Monday, September 14, which makes this a great time for families to and students to get ready for that first day. From preparing a learning space to charging your iPad, there are a number of key steps that families can take now to ensure a successful start to the school year, according to Interim Superintendent Lora Nordquist.

 

“This year, the first day of school will look a little different, but it’s still an exciting time for our families and students. In order to make that first day as meaningful as possible, we want families to help get students ready to learn with a few simple steps,” said Nordquist.

 

ALL AGES

Prepare a space to learn. Talk to students about where they would like to set up a space to learn. “A learning space doesn’t need to be fancy or elaborate. But we know that having a dedicated area – the corner of the living room or a kitchen counter – can help prepare students mentally to learn each day,” said Nordquist. “Thinking about where children will learn can help set their frame of mind for that first day and the rest of the year.”

 

Adjust schedules. It’s time to start heading to bed earlier and getting up earlier in the morning so that students can avoid feeling groggy that first day back.

 

Free meals. Our schools continue to offer free meals for children age 0-18, serving breakfast and lunch ‘Grab and Go’ meals at 19 schools throughout Bend, La Pine and Sunriver between 11:30 a.m. and 12:45 p.m. Monday to Friday. Take a look at the list of schools to find the spot closest for your family (students can grab a meal at any location).

 

Material pick-ups. Most schools are hosting materials pick-ups for students, including hands-on learning materials, iPads and more. If you haven’t heard from your school, be sure to get in touch to collect any needed items before the start of school.

 

WebEx. Teachers will use the WebEx platform to host live meetings with students. Learn more about WebEx and how to download it onto a student issued iPad.  WebEx meetings, small groups and one-on-one sessions are hosted within teacher’s WebEx rooms. To find a teacher’s room, go to: http://bls.webex.com/meet/first.last Those experiencing challenges logging in to a teacher’s room should contact the school.

 

Home Help Line. Call the student support line for help with iPads and student accounts: 541-355-8700 (bilingual).

 

GRADES K-2

Teacher connection. Students in kindergarten to second grade will begin the year with a focus on connections and hands-on materials. Families should watch for communication from teachers this week about when and how to connect. 

 

Devices. Schools are awaiting a shipment of iPads for our K-2 students. For the moment, we will only be distributing to families who don’t have a device at home. We expect iPads to arrive within the next couple weeks.

 

Seesaw. Seesaw is an app where students, teachers, and families can share work and announcements in a safe, secure and private environment. It will be the primary platform that teachers in grades K-2 will use for instruction.

 

GRADES 3-5

iPads. Students in grades 4-5 should have their school-issued iPad from the previous school year. New students and those in grade 3 will receive an iPad from the school (be sure to check in with your school if you do not have one). Take time to charge the device. Find more iPad resources on our website.   

 

Google Classroom. Google Classroom is a workflow tool that allows teachers to assign work, share links and resources and make class announcements. It will be the primary platform that teachers in grades 3-5 use for instruction.

 

GRADES 6-12

iPads: Every student should have a school assigned iPad. Your iPad should be charged and ready for school every day. Students who do not have a school iPad should reach out to their school prior to the first day. Find more iPad resources on our website.   

 

Canvas: Canvas is our new learning management system for grades 6-12. All students in sixth through twelfth grade will be logging onto Canvas to access their course materials.  Students will be expected to log onto Canvas daily to access assignments, online discussions, and assessments. Learn more about Canvas on our website or watch these short overview videos:

 

·         VIDEO: Canvas Overview for Student

·         VIDEO: Canvas Overview for Families

 

Check email. Prior to the first day of school, students should check their school district email for updates and key information. Find instructions on how to set up student email on the iPad. 

 

Review Daily Learning Schedule. Starting Sept. 14, students should be ready to login to their first class and begin learning.

 

#END#

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



FEMA Authorizes Federal Funds to Help Fight Three Additional Fires in Oregon 

 

BOTHELL, Wash. – The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has authorized the use of federal funds to help with firefighting costs for the Riverside Fire in Clackamas County, the South Obenchain Fire in Jackson County, and the Archie Creek Fire in Douglas County, Oregon. 

FEMA Region 10 Administrator Mike O'Hare determined that the fires threatened to cause such destruction as would constitute a major disaster, and on Wednesday he approved the state of Oregon's requests for Fire Management Assistance Grants (FMAG).

The Riverside Fire started on Tuesday, burning over 100,000 acres of federal and private land. At the time of the request, the fire threatened an unknown number of homes in and around the communities of Colton, Elwood, Dodge, Faraday, Damascus, Beavercreek and Escatada. The fire also threatened transmission lines, private forest lands, industrial areas, fish bearing streams, along with unknown number of residences and business in the area. Almost all of Clackamas County is under Level Three evacuation notices. 

The South Obenchain Fire started on Tuesday, burning over 8,000 acres of private land. At the time of the request, the fire threatened 1,291 households in and around the communities of Eagle Point, White City, Butte Falls, Shady Cove, and the surrounding Rouge Valley. A reported nine structures had been destroyed. The fire also threatened Interstate 5 and Highway 140 and local watersheds in the area. 

The Archie Creek Fire started on Tuesday, burning in excess of 5,700 acres of federal and private land. At the time of the request, the fire threatened up to 300 homes in and around the communities of Gide, Idleyld Park, and Steamboat. The fire also threatened transmission lines in the area. More than 2,500 people are under Level Two and Three evacuation notices, and up to 300 homes are under Level Three evacuation notices with another over 500 homes under a Level Two notice.  

The total number of FMAGs approved for Oregon during this fire season is 11.  

FMAGs are provided through the President's Disaster Relief Fund and are made available by FEMA to assist in fighting fires that threaten to cause a major disaster. Eligible items can include expenses for field camps; equipment use, repair and replacement; mobilization and demobilization activities; and tools, materials and supplies. 

In addition to reimbursement funding for fighting the fire, $1,889,043 in mitigation assistance will be available to Oregon. The Disaster Recovery Reform Act of 2018 authorizes FEMA to provide Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) Post-Fire funds to eligible states and territories that receive Fire Management Assistance declarations and federally recognized tribes that have land burned within a designated area. 

FEMA encourages HMGP Post-Fire funds be used for the mitigation of wildfire and related hazards, such as flood or erosion. However, HMGP is available for risk reduction of any hazard. 

 

###



Greetings,
Today as fires are still raging across Oregon, causing large scale evacuations in Klamath, Jackson, Josephine, Douglas, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, and Clackamas Counties, we grieve for the families, businesses and beautiful natural areas severely affected by this unprecedented disaster in Oregon.
 
My heart goes out to all of the families and communities. Please reach out to loved ones and neighbors who are suffering and in need.  We are all in this together.
 
In Bend and Deschutes County the winds are forecasted to shift in the next 24-48 hours, bringing more smoke and increasing the chance of fire getting out of control in the forests on the edge of, and within, our communities. Deschutes National Forest, Deschutes County and the Bend Fire are all working to get this message out:   
 
Extreme Fire Danger, All Fires Prohibited
 
Currently there are no active fires in Deschutes County, and let’s do our best to keep it that way. With the recent wildfire events across the state of Oregon and extreme strain on our local fire resources, Bend Fire & Rescue has placed a ban on all fires, effective immediately. This is in conjunction with Redmond Fire & Rescue and other local, state and federal agencies. The ban will be in place until further notice. 
 
Fires can start so easily, with just one small spark from a dragging chain on a car or something equally as tiny and seemingly insignificant. It’s each and all of our job to be extremely careful during this time.
 
In order to stay informed on evacuations and emergency alerts in Deschutes County, you can sign up for alerts through Deschutes County Alerts System. This includes evacuation alerts like the ones sent out notifying residents of evacuation levels during the Rosland Road fire. 
 
Many have been asking me for fire information. Here are a number of social media pages. As this is an extremely rapidly evolving and unprecedented event, information management has been challenging, but is getting better.

 
Here is a brief update on what is happening in the county, from the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office Emergency Management:
 

  • There are NO active evacuations in Deschutes County
  • The Deschutes County Fairgrounds has been established as a Temporary Evacuation Point for those displaced by fires in the Santiam River Canyon (Beachie/Santiam/Mad Hatter/Lionshead Fires) and the McKenzie River Canyon (Holiday Farm Fire). The Red Cross is handling sheltering logistics. 
  • At this time, no congregate shelter in Deschutes County has been established due to COVID-19 concerns
  • The Pet Evacuation Team remains on standby to establish large animal sheltering operations at the Fairgrounds if that need arises
  • The Central Oregon Emergency Information Network (COEIN) has been activated virtually to support the dissemination of accurate and timely public information
  • The Red Cross’ Safe and Well program continues to be an excellent way to find and connect with displaced family members.

 
Be safe and look out for your neighbors. Please let me know if you have any questions.
 
Take care,
Sally



Crater Lake National Park Notifies Visitors and Residents to “Be Ready”  

for Potential Evacuation 

 

CRATER LAKE, OREGON – Crater Lake National Park has issued a Level 1 Evacuation Notice for the entire park effective at 12:00 Noon, September 10, 2020.  The Level 1 notice informs residents and visitors to “be ready” for a potential evacuation, including employee dormitories and trailer sites, in the event that a fire approaches these areas.  Current or projected threats from nearby fires indicate that there may be a need to evacuate in the future, however, there are no mandatory evacuations at this time.    

 

There are three evacuation notice levels: Level 1 “BE READY” for potential evacuation; Level 2 “BE SET” to evacuate; and Level 3 “GO” evacuate now.  This is the time for preparation and precautionary movement of persons with special needs, mobile property, and pets.  If conditions worsen, emergency services personnel may contact you via an emergency notification system.  In the event that this occurs, the park will make every attempt to contact visitors and residents personally.  If you are absent from your residence, lodging room, campsite, or vehicle for more than a short time, please leave a note with your name and a contact telephone number in a door or window where it can be easily seen. 

 

Residents and park visitors will be advised as conditions change and are encouraged to check the park website (www.nps.gov/crla), Facebook, or Twitter for current status and updates.  Fire information is also available at the two entrance stations and on information boards located around the park.   

 

While there is not currently a fire in the park, there are several reasons for the implementation of this notice.   

  • Fire danger is extremely high, with very low humidity and exceptionally dry conditions after long periods of high temperatures with no precipitation.  
  • There is an extreme shortage of fire fighting resources because of numerous fires throughout the West and Northwest.  Should a fire start in the park, outside resources may be difficult to obtain. 
  • The egress in and out of the park is impacted by nearby fires and road closures and could be further reduced as conditions change. 
     


 



HOW TO REDUCE IMPACT OF HAZARDOUS WILDFIRE SMOKE AT WORK

 

News Release from SAIF

SAIF offers ten considerations for reducing smoke exposure in the workplace.

-----

With several days of hazardous smoke conditions in the forecast, SAIF wants to make sure workplaces are as safe as possible. 

“This was already a difficult time for Oregon businesses, and we know wildfire smoke is now another significant concern,” said David Johnson, industrial hygiene supervisor at SAIF. “There are simple things any business can do to reduce the impact the poor air quality has on employees.”

In addition to a brief video on quick tips, here are ten things to consider during a wildfire smoke event—and balancing it with a pandemic:

  1. Reduce outdoor air flow: Shut down outside air intakes and adjust your air conditioning to use recirculated air. While the precaution for COVID-19 is to increase outdoor air flow, that should not be the case when the outdoor air quality is considered hazardous.
  2. Change your HVAC filters: Consider also using a HEPA-rated room air filtration unit.
  3. Keep windows and doors closed: Reduce entering and exiting the building.
  4. Re-assign work: If possible, relocate or re-assign outdoor activities out of the smoke zone.
  5. Cease work: If the air quality and/or visibility presents health and safety hazards, consider closing or stopping specific job functions.
  6. Communicate frequently with employees and customers: Let them know about any changes to your schedule, operations, or availability.
  7. Monitor communication channels: This includes the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality and Oregon Health Authority.
  8. Consider providing masks: While N-95 masks are in short supply, other face masks will provide some protection, including N-99, N-100, or an elastomeric respirator with cartridges that offer the same level of filtration.
  9. Reduce other pollutants: Cut down on other sources of air pollutants, like vacuuming and cooking indoors, or smoking and burning fuel outdoors.
  10. Update your plan: Once the smoke has cleared, consider adding wildfire smoke events to your emergency response and business continuity plans.

Find more information at saif.com/prepare, and download this handout on preparing for wildfire season

About SAIF

SAIF is Oregon's not-for-profit workers' compensation insurance company. Since 1914, we've been taking care of injured workers, helping people get back to work, and striving to make Oregon the safest and healthiest place to work. For more information, visit the About SAIF page on saif.com.



At 7:00 am, Friday, Sept. 11 Bend Heroes Foundation and volunteers will be honoring those who perished and wounded by terrorist attacks in New York, Pentagon and Pennsylvania 19 years ago. Bend’s First Responders, veterans and volunteers will install flags at Bend Heroes Memorial (Brooks Park) and along Veterans Memorial Bridge (Newport Ave.). Proclamations will be read.

 

As part of the 9/11 ceremony, a special award will be presented to 3 young heroic hikers from Prineville who helped rescue a severely injured hiker in the Cascades last July. The award is from the National President of the American Legion Auxiliary. The award was requested by Yvonne Drury, President of the American Legion Auxiliary in Bend. Yvonne will present the award to the heroic hikers and their parents. Yvonne is also Vice President, Bend Heroes Foundation.

 

Mark Morical reported this amazing search and rescue effort and the heroism of the 3 young hikers in July and August.

 

Dick Tobiason

Chairman, Bend Heroes Foundation

LTC US Army, Retired



Lionshead Fire Update – Thursday, September 10, 2020 – 9:00 a.m. 


 

Weather and Fire Behavior: Morning winds from the southeast are expected to shift to the northwest this afternoon, promoting fire spread back to the south and east. Temperatures will be in the 70s with minimum relative humidity in the teens. Drought conditions, higher temperatures and low relative humidity will continue to contribute to the active fire behavior. 

Current Situation: The Lionshead fire continues to actively grow on the west side of the crest of the cascades, expanding both to the north and the south. The western edge of the fire has joined with the Beachie Creek Fire near Detroit Lake. Fire personnel continue to scout the northern and southern edges of the fire area, identifying where the fire has grown and looking for potential locations for containment lines. Due to the extreme low visibility and fire activity in the area firefighters were assisted by the 141st Air Refueling Wing of the Washington National Guard with one RC-26 aircraft and Distributed Real-Time Infrared (DRTI) capabilities. Night crews continued to patrol and secure fire edges around Idanha and Detroit, working to secure properties and infrastructure. 

Crews continue to aggressively work to strengthen lines of the fire on the eastern side of the crest of the cascade on the Warm Springs Reservation. In preparation of the predicted westerly wind change forecasted this afternoon night crews used strategic firing operations to widen and improve control lines. Firefighters will use the strengthened lines combined with natural barriers to help hold the fire from spreading when winds move back to a westerly flow this afternoon.  

Today’s Activities: Current wildfires in the Pacific Northwest continue to be a dynamic situation. The highest priority for the Lionshead Fire continues to be safety of the public and our firefighters. West of the crest of the cascade firefighters will continue to scout the north and south fire edges to determine locations for containment lines. Providing protection to infrastructure, assisting local fire departments and agencies as needed. On the Warm Springs Reservation firefighters will continue hardening containment lines and preparing for the wind to return to the westerly flow. Additional fire camps and air operation bases are being set up, crews and equipment are coming in as resources are available. 

Evacuations: Orders are being issued for evacuations as conditions change. Please monitor the local area sheriff’s department websites and Facebook for updates. (Deschutes, Jefferson, Wasco, Linn, and Marion counties). The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has created an interactive dashboard to help provide the most up-to-date information on evacuations statewide. https://experience.arcgis.com/experience/6329d5e4e13748b9b9f7f33f06a3c376/ 

Closures: For public and firefighter safety, roads and trails on the southwest portion of the Warm Springs Reservation near the fires are closed to the public. Forest closures are in place for Deschutes, Mt. Hood and Willamette National Forests.  For more information about forest closures, please refer to National Forest websites.  

 Deschutes NF Alerts     Willamette NF Alerts     Mt. Hood NF Alerts    

 

FOR ADDITIONAL FIRE INFORMATION:  

TripCheck: https://www.tripcheck.com/

Inciweb:  https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/7049/        

Facebook: www.facebook.com/LionsheadFire   

Email:  2020.lionshead@firenet.gov     



 

Start date: Aug, 16, 2020 

Location: 

Santiam Canyon west of Detroit, OR, Southern Clackamas County 

 

Cause: Unknown 

 

Fire size: 182,000 Acres 

 

Air Assets Assigned: 5 

Total personnel: 423 

 
Start date: Aug, 16, 2020 
Location: Santiam Canyon west of Detroit, OR, Southern Clackamas County 
 
Cause: Unknown 
 
Fire size: 182,000 Acres 
 
Air Assets Assigned: 5  
Total personnel:   423  
Beachie Creek Fire (*Incident Name Update) Update for Thursday September 10, 2020 
 
Salem, Ore. – Fire Operations continue to be in rescue mode; however, firefighters made significant progress yesterday in opening roadways for emergency personnel. This has created critical access for crews to affect rescues and for trapped citizens to evacuate. Additionally, as fire crews and law enforcement officers patrol the interior of the fire we gain critical intelligence on the extent of destruction. 
 
The cities of Mill City, Gates, Lyons, Mehama, Detroit and other areas along Hwy 22 have seen significant damage.  The fire has destroyed multiple buildings along the Santiam Canyon.  Fire managers have now determined that at least 13 new fires were started between Detroit and Mehama from downed powerlines during the peak of Monday’s wind event and then on Tuesday a large front of wind-driven fire ran through the city of Detroit from the east. Local fire departments along the Hwy 22 corridor and along the northern flanks of the fire continue to respond to 911 calls for rescues and new fires. Firefighters also continued their rescue operations in the North Fork Area and along the northern and western perimeter areas of the fire. 
 
Fire crews are working in close coordination with ODOT, Oregon State Police and the Marion County Sheriff’s Office to create road access, effect rescues and assess the extent of damage. Evacuation notices are being coordinated by the Marion County Sheriff’s Office who are working to identify victims and notify next of kin.  
 
Rescue operations have been extensive and wide-ranging. Rescues have varied widely, in some cases individuals were impeded by downed trees and roadway blockages while others escaped the heavy smoke, high heat and flames by moving to local waterways. Individuals found with injuries were transported to local hospitals for further care and assessment.  
 
Currently 9,764 structures are at Level 3 evacuations and another 11,941 homes are under in level 2 evacuations.  
 
For the safety of first responders, fire officials want to stress how important it is that the public stay out of the fire perimeter. There are many fallen trees, hanging snags and power lines impeding roadways and it is not safe to access these areas. 
 
Fire is a dynamic situation and a rapidly evolving incident. For better accounting of fire resources assigned, the name has been updated to reflect the original assignment. The name of the fire will be referred to as the Beachie Creek Fire. 
 
WEATHER: Red Flag Warnings have been extended through 8 AM PDT Thursday due to the continuation of dry and windy  conditions in these areas tonight. Winds should begin to fall below critical thresholds elsewhere. Dry and possibly unstable  conditions are expected today. Onshore flow returns by Friday and continues through the weekend and into next week. 
 
SAFETY: Members of the public are encouraged to heed local evacuation orders issued by the county sheriff’s office and emergency notification systems. Any public trying to access the area are asked to stay away to keep roads clear for those evacuating and for emergency vehicles. The roads are extremely hazardous due to falling debris, smoke and emergency vehicle traffic. Members of the public in the immediate area are asked to keep the Ready, Set, Go levels of evacuation in mind. READY your belongings; SET your things at the door or prepack them in your car; GO Leave immediately.  
 
SMOKE:  Smoke is expected to remain heavy throughout the area for the next several days. Individuals with respiratory issues may find themselves affected by the intense smoke. Smoke levels are fluctuating between unhealthy for sensitive groups (orange) and hazardous (maroon) in these areas. Areas closest to fires - near Detroit, Florence, Chiloquin and Eugene - are having the worst smoke impacts. Smoke levels can change rapidly depending on weather. Check current conditions on DEQ's Air Quality Index or by downloading the free OregonAIR app on your smartphone. 
 
CLOSURES: Willamette National Forest roads, trails, and lands around the fire area are closed. View the official order (Order 06-18-04-20-13) or go to InciWeb (link below) for a list and map of the closed roads, trails, and recreation sites. 
 



Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office Emergency Management wanted to take a few minutes this morning to update you as to the fire situation around the state and how it relates to Deschutes County:

• There are NO active evacuations in Deschutes County

• The Deschutes County Fairgrounds has been established as a Temporary Evacuation Point for those displaced by fires in the Santiam River Canyon (Beachie/Santiam/Mad Hatter/Lionshead Fires) and the McKenzie River Canyon (Holiday Farm Fire). The Red Cross is handling sheltering logistics.

• At this time, no congregate shelter in Deschutes County has been established due to COVID-19 concerns

• The Pet Evacuation Team remains on standby to establish large animal sheltering operations at the Fairgrounds if that need arises

• The Central Oregon Emergency Information Network (COEIN) has been activated virtually to support the dissemination of accurate and timely public information

• The Red Cross’ Safe and Well program continues to be an excellent way to find and connect with displaced family members.



PACIFIC POWER WORKING TO RESTORE SERVICE, ASSIST EMERGENCY RESPONDERS AND PREPARE COMMUNITIES FOR RECOVERY

 

News Release from Pacific Power
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Pacific Power working to restore service, assist emergency responders and prepare communities for recovery

 

PORTLAND, Ore.  — Pacific Power crews continue to work closely with emergency responders inspecting damage and restoring service to customers across a wide region of Oregon still being devastated by historically severe wind-fueled wildfires.

 

As of 8 p.m. Wednesday, approximately 17,000 Oregon Pacific Power customers were without power due to the windstorm and ensuing wildfires that hit the state beginning Sept. 7. That figure is down from 60,000 customers out during the peak on Sept. 7. About 11,000 of the customers without service are out because Pacific Power turned off electricity to several lines in Jackson County at the request of local emergency agencies to allow firefighters to do their jobs safely.

 

“We are here to support our communities and customers during this historic event in our state,” said Scott Bolton, senior vice president of external affairs and customer solutions. “Our priority is to assure the safety of people on the ground and protect the power grid from damage. We know the days ahead will be challenging for many Oregonians and we stand ready to help our communities both now and as we rebuild in the coming weeks and months.”

 

Pacific Power is working together with local emergency authorities to ensure safety, assess outages and support efforts during these early and very active stages of the wildfires in Oregon. Information will be shared as it becomes available. Pacific Power is aware of unconfirmed reports that fires have been started by electrical equipment, however, until crews have greater access to the regions affected, this information cannot be verified.

 

The latest list of communities hardest hit by power outages includes:

Jackson and Josephine Counties: 12,000 customers out

Lincoln County: 2,500 customers out

Marion and Linn Counties 900 customers out

 

Pacific Power is encouraging all customers to be prepared for prolonged power outages by having on hand adequate food, water and back-up batteries. Forecasts indicate high winds will subside Thursday and restoration will accelerate where possible. In many instances, Pacific Power crews need to stay clear of fire-ravaged areas until given permission by local firefighting authorities.

 

Additional crews and line personnel have been deployed and are assisting in outage restoration efforts. Customer care agents are also on the job to answer your inquiries.

 

Pacific Power urges customers and all residents to keep themselves informed of local alerts and follow guidance from emergency officials.

 

Shelter Information

Pacific Power is assisting with evacuations under the direction of local authorities, engaging with the Red Cross, and will provide additional support to emergency services as needs become clear. Pacific Power stands with our communities during this challenging time. Support is available for those in wildfire affected areas at the following community shelter locations:

 

Oregon

Josephine County Fairgrounds – 1451 Fairgrounds Rd, Grants Pass

Jackson County Expo – 1 Peninger Rd, Central Point

Oregon State Fairgrounds – 2330 17th St. NE, Salem

Klamath County Fair Grounds – 3531 S 6th St, Klamath Falls

Kla-Mo-Ya Casino – 34333 US-97, Chiloquin

Linn County Fairgrounds – 3700 Knox Butte Rd E, Albany

Benton County Fairgrounds – 110 SW 53rd St, Corvallis

Deschutes County Fairgrounds – 3800 SW Airport Way, Redmond

Douglas County Fairgrounds – 2110 Frear St., Roseburg

Polk County Fairgrounds – 520 S Pacific Hwy W, Rickreall

Newport Recreation Center – 225 SE Avery St, Newport

 

Northern California:

Kahtishraam Wellness Center – 1403 Kahtishraam, Yreka

Siskiyou County Fairgrounds (taking large animals) – 1712 Fairlane Rd, Yreka



BEND FIRE DEPARTMENT CLOSING ALL RECREATIONAL FIRES

News Release from Bend Fire & Rescue
 

With the recent wildfire events across the state of Oregon and extreme strain on our local fire resources, Bend Fire & Rescue has placed a ban on all recreational fires, effective immediately. This is in conjunction wtih Redmond Fire & Rescue and other local, state and federal agencies. The burning ban will be in place until further notice. 

Recreational fires include those used for pleasure, religious, ceremonial, cooking, warmth, or similar purposes. Barbeques and propane fires are still allowed.

For more information about burn regulations in Bend please visit our website at www.bendoregon.gov/burninginfo



Transportation:

ODOT: SW Oregon:
Morning Situation Report:
*Almeda Fire area: Oregon 99 remains closed to the public between north Ashland (South Valley View Drive) and south Medford (Garfield Street) for fire operations. This includes the cities of Talent and Phoenix. Please respect the closure areas. Do not drive through or around closure points. This is a hazard to public/first responder safety and clogs the transportation routes.
*Obenchain Fire area: Oregon 62 between Oregon 234 north through Shady Cove to Tiller-Trail junction. This section of highway remains closed to traffic for fire operations. Avoid the area. Motor carriers: seek alternate routes.
*Archie Fire & Diamond Lake area fires: Oregon 138E remains closed from Glide east to the junction of Oregon 230.
*Slater Fire in Illinois Valley: U.S. 199 (Redwood Highway) remains closed from the OR/Cal border north to near Cave Junction. (Also closed in California)
Do not put yourself at risk by using forest roads to get around fire closure areas
Updated highway conditions at Tripcheck.com UPDATE



SANTIAM CANYON, OR  --The battle continues against the Santiam fire, formerly called the Beachie Creek Fire, that has burned at least 159-thousand acres and is zero-percent contained. Incident commander Les Uhlman says, when the fire raced down from the cascades, firefighters did their best to slow it and get people evacuated. He says crews are just starting to search the towns of Detroit, Lyons and Gates. At least three deaths have been confirmed, with more expected. Uhlman says the fire will forever change the landscape of the canyon.



BEND, OR -- Officials from Summit Medical briefed Deschutes County Commissioners about their recent COVID-19 testing efforts. Chief Operating Officer Justin Sivill says they have tested more than 21-hundred people for the virus in the last 4 weeks and had a positive rate of less than 1-per cent. Summit officials also told commissioners the number of virus tests have dropped off but they expect an uptick in testing when flu season arrives.



BENDF, OR -- Deschutes County Commissioners were briefed yesterday about suicide rates between the years 2000 to 2017. Suicide Prevention Coordinator Whitney Schumacher told the board the report is the first of its kind in Deschutes county. She says the report look at the reasons for suicide including intimate partner problems and financial hardship. Schumacher says a troubling statistic is the number of people under age 24 who have taken their own lives more than doubled between 2000 and 2017. To read the 57 page analysis log onto www.deschutescounty.org/suicide prevention.



CENTRAL OREGON -- At one minute after midnight tonight no camp fires or propane fire pits are allowed on any US Forest Service or BLM managed lands in Central Oregon. Public Information Officer Kassidy Kern with the Forest Service says there are not enough....resources to fight any more wildfires in the area. She says also just after midnight the Industrial Fire Protection Level is being raised to Number 4, which is a general shutdown for the commercial logging industry.



The Lionshead Fire moved to the west over the crest of the Cascades due to east winds. The fire is only 5-per cent contained and is at 109-thousand-223 acres. Officials say the fire movement led to long range spotting, contributing to 12 miles of fire spread. The Lionshead Fire is near Breitenbush Hot Springs and Detroit Lake. The fire also crossed Highway 22 in multiple places forcing evacuation notices for residents and campers in the area. The Riverside Fire on the Mount Hood National Forest has burned nearly 113-thousand acres. It’s two miles southeast of Estacada where numerous evacuations are active throughout Clackamas County



VENETA, Ore. — State forestland in Lane, Douglas, Coos, Jackson, Josephine, and Klamath counties are closed to public entry and use until further notice.

This includes the Gilchrist and Sun Pass state forests in Klamath County. Closure is necessary due to the current extreme fire conditions that are endangering life, forest resources, and property as well as very limited fire and emergency response resources.

This move means that all lands managed by the Oregon Department of Forestry are closed to public use. It also includes the Tillamook, Clatsop and Santiam state forests and other ODF-managed forestlands in Lane, Douglas, Coos, Jackson, Josephine, Klamath, Polk, Lincoln, & Benton counties. The Santiam State Forest is closed until further notice. Other closures in northwest Oregon will last until at least Sunday, Sept. 13 at 11 p.m.



Salem, OR – September 9, 2020 – A second night of strong winds continued to fuel fires across Oregon and conditions are changing rapidly. The State Emergency Coordination Center (ECC) is working with state agencies, counties and tribes to support a wide variety of needs.

An Oregon Wildfire Resource Website has been created to help Oregonians stay informed and safe: https://wildfire.oregon.gov/.  For additional information, the media and public are encouraged to follow OEM social media platforms @OregonOEM and https://www.facebook.com/OMDOEM/

“We are all in this together,” said OEM Director Andrew Phelps. “If you’re somewhere safe, stay put. Stay informed, be ready, and know where to go and what to bring if you must evacuate.”

Evacuation status
Local evacuation information can be found on the OEM Wildfire dashboard. Information is ever-changing so continue to check back for updated content.

Check with your county office of emergency management to sign up for local emergency alerts.

Know your evacuation levels!

Level 1 – BE READY – Monitor emergency services websites and local media outlets for information. This is the time for preparation and precautionary movement of persons with special needs and, in some cases, pets and livestock.

Level 2 – BE SET – Be ready to leave at a moment’s notice. There is significant danger to your area. Be prepared to voluntarily relocate to a Temporary Evacuation Point (TEPO as set up by the Red Cross, or move to family/friends outside of the affected area.

Level 3 – GO – Leave immediately! Danger to your area is current or imminent. Do not delay leaving to gather any belongings or make efforts to protect your home.

The American Red Cross is operating several Temporary Evacuation Points (TEPs) where evacuees can go for information and assistance. Locations change with the need. As of 10 a.m. today, TEPs are located at:

  • Thurston High School, 333 58th St., Springfield, OR
  • Deschutes County Fairgrounds, 3800 SW Airport Way, Redmond, OR
  • Clackamas Community College, 19600 Molalla Ave., Oregon City, OR
  • Douglas County Fairgrounds, 2110 Frear St., Roseburg, OR
  • Oregon State Fairgrounds, 2330 17th St., NE, Salem, OR
  • Taft High School, 3780 Spyglass Ridge Dr., Lincoln City, OR

Letting loved ones know you are safe
The American Red Cross Safe and Well Website is a way for people affected by disaster to enter information regarding their welfare so family and friends can check their status. OEM encourages people affected by the current fires, whether or not they have evacuated, to register on the site. It is a helpful tool that can bring relief to people looking for loved ones during these fires, and help inform search efforts.

Donations
State partners, local communities and voluntary organizations are working to identify needs of Oregonians affected by the fires. At this time, the best way to support the communities is to provide financial donations to relief organizations actively responding to these disasters. For verified disaster relief organizations, please refer to Oregon Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (ORVOAD) at www.orvoad.org. Organizations include the American Red Cross, Team Rubicon, Salvation Army, Southern Baptist Disaster Relief, and the Wildland Firefighters Fund. As needs for donations and volunteers are identified, they will be messaged out through the State JIC.

Transportation/Travel
Several roads are closed in affected fire areas. Check TripCheck for the latest information.  If you do not need to travel, please stay off roadways to allow clear access for first responders and evacuees.

Public Safety Power Shutoffs
PGE implemented a public safety power shutoff (PSPS) due to hot, dry, and windy conditions for customers in fire-risk areas near Mt. Hood. This is a proactive safety outage to help protect people, property and the environment in the face of extreme fire danger conditions and high winds forecast in the area. For information about PSPSs, including a map of the affected area, go to PortlandGeneral.com/wildfire or call 503-228-6322 or 800-542-8818. Real-time information about unplanned outages can be found at PortlandGeneral.com/Outage. 

Smoke
Smoke levels are currently fluctuating between unhealthy for sensitive groups and hazardous in areas closest to fires. Smoke can irritate the eyes and lungs and worsen some medical conditions. Young children, adults over 65, pregnant women and people with heart disease, asthma or other respiratory conditions are most at risk. Cloth, dust and surgical masks don’t protect from the harmful particles in smoke. Additional information on wildfire smoke can be found on the Oregon Smoke Blog.

State Park and State Forest Closures
State parks that are closed until further notice include Silver Falls, Detroit Lake, North Santiam and Collier (north of Klamath Falls). No entry for any purpose is permitted.

Due to the current extreme fire conditions that are endangering life, forest resources and property, as well as very limited fire and emergency response resources The Tillamook, Clatsop and Santiam state forests are closed to all public entry and use effective immediately, as are scattered state forestlands in Polk, Lincoln and Benton counties. Anyone currently in these areas needs to leave right away.

The Santiam State Forest is closed until further notice. Other closures will last until at least Sunday, Sept. 13 at 11 p.m.

COVID-19
Amid wildfire, smoke and erratic weather, the COVID-19 pandemic is still rampant. Face coverings are required in all parts of the state and Oregonians are reminded to maintain social distancing, and wash hands frequently.

This update contains information from other state agency reports.



FEMA Authorizes Federal Funds to Help Fight Three Fires in Oregon 

 

BOTHELL, Wash. – The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) authorized the use of federal funds to help with firefighting costs for the Holiday Farm Fire in Lane County, the Powerline fire in Washington County, and the Echo Mountain Complex Fire in Lincoln County, Oregon. 

FEMA Region 10 Administrator Mike O’Hare determined that the fire threatened to cause such destruction as would constitute a major disaster. He approved the state of Oregon’s requests for federal Fire Management Assistance Grants (FMAG) for these incidents on Tuesday. 

The Holiday Farm Fire started on Tuesday, burning over 15,000 acres of federal and private land, and at the time of the request the fire threatened more than 200 homes in and around the communities of Blue River, Vida, Leaburg, and Thurston Hill. The fire also threatened a fire station, Highway 126, transmission lines and multiple small businesses in the area. Level One, Two and Three evacuations were issued for approximately 28 miles. 

The Powerline Fire started on Tuesday, burning more than 50 acres of private land, and at the time of the request the fire threatened more than 600 homes in and around the community of Cherry Grove. The fire also threatened a slow water sand filter plant that provides water resources to the larger Hillsboro area, the Stimpson Mill, and Henry Hagg Lake. Level Three evacuations were issued for approximately 600 homes. 

The Echo Mountain Complex Fire started on Tuesday, burning over 1,350 acres of federal and private land, which includes the Kimberling Road Complex Fire, as well as unnamed fires burning in Lincoln County. At the time of the request, the complex threatened more than 250 homes in and around the town of Otis. The fire also threatened homes near Highway 18, Panther Creek, Rose Ledge, and Willis Creek in the area. Level One, Two, and Three evacuations were issued for at least 250 homes. 

With these latest three fire declarations, FEMA has granted the state of Oregon a total of seven FMAGs this fire season. 

FMAGs are provided through the President's Disaster Relief Fund and are made available by FEMA to assist in fighting fires that threaten to cause a major disaster. Eligible items can include expenses for field camps; equipment use, repair and replacement; mobilization and demobilization activities; and tools, materials and supplies. 

In addition to reimbursement funding for fighting the fire, $1,889,043 in mitigation assistance will be available to Oregon. The Disaster Recovery Reform Act of 2018 authorizes FEMA to provide Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) Post-Fire funds to eligible states and territories that receive Fire Management Assistance declarations and federally recognized tribes that have land burned within a designated area. 

FEMA encourages HMGP Post-Fire funds be used for the mitigation of wildfire and related hazards, such as flood or erosion. However, HMGP is available for risk reduction of any hazard. 

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FEMA's mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters



Forest Officials to ban all campfires on federally managed public lands beginning Friday Industrial Fire Precaution Level increases to IV—full shutdown 
 
Central Oregon – Forest officials for the Deschutes and Ochoco National Forests and Crooked River National Grassland and the Prineville District Bureau of Land Management will implement a complete ban on all campfires and propane fire pits on all federally managed public lands and raise the Industrial Fire Precaution Level (IFPL) to IV effective Friday, September 11 at 12:01 a.m. 
 
With multiple human caused starts in the past several days while firefighters battle numerous large fires in Oregon, in addition to the EXTREME fire danger in Central Oregon, the decision was made to ban all active flames from campfires and propane fire pits. This is a change from previous Public Use Restrictions where campfires were allowed in designated campgrounds. Camp stoves used specifically for cooking are still allowed on public lands.  
 
An IFPL Level IV or “General Shutdown” means that all industrial operations (thinning and logging) are prohibited. No waivers will be granted for any activity. Personal use firewood cutting remains prohibited under this level.  
 
Fire officials encourage the public to be diligent with all ignition sources on public lands, ensuring all cigarette butts are properly extinguished in an ashtray or dish of water and spark arrestors are in place on all motorized equipment. Additionally, all motorized recreationists should park in areas cleared of vegetation – the undercarriage of a vehicle can be hot enough to start a fire. Also, officials want to remind the public that using explosive target material, such as Tannerite, and the use of explosives and fireworks continues to be prohibited on all federal public lands. 
 
For more information on wildfires in Central Oregon, visit: www.centraloregonfire.org  
 



Holiday Farm Fire – This fire started yesterday, although the exact cause isn’t yet known. The fire is currently burning on both sides of Highway 126 and the McKenzie River. It is moving west from approximately mile post 47 and is currently two miles past Vida. The fire is estimated at 37,000 acres.

At 2:33 a.m. the Governor declared this fire a conflagration. This allows local resources from across the state to help, however firefighting resources are extremely scarce due to the large number of fires burning in Oregon and along the entire west coast.

There were a number of residents who were unable to evacuate due to roads blocked by fire and debris. After several roads were cleared, firefighters helped 46 people escape the evacuation zone this afternoon.

Three Lane County Task Force teams responded around 8:30 p.m. last night to help fight the fire. They were blocked in due to fallen debris on roads. The crews were in a safe area and no firefighters have been injured. As of 1:45 p.m. today the road has been cleared and the firefighters were able to return to the firefight. Rescue, evacuation work and road clearing continue throughout the area.

Despite the hard work of firefighters, the fast-moving flames have destroyed homes and structures last night and today. Crews are diligently working to find anyone still trapped in their homes and will assess the damage over the coming days.

This fire damaged communications towers throughout the area. Communications are limited along the Highway 126 corridor. Teams are actively working to reestablish effective communications.

Additional wild land fire suppression resources, including an Oregon Department of Forestry Type 1 Incident Management Team, are continuing to arrive. These personnel will be looking for every opportunity to attack the fire directly.

Weather/Fire Behavior:

Conditions will make rapid fire spread likely for at least the next two days; a red flag warning remains in effect until Thursday. Winds are blowing smoke and ash from the Holiday Farm Fire throughout the area.

Evacuations:

Evacuations remain in effect due to this fire, impacting the communities of Vida, Blue River, Mohawk, McKenzie Bridge, Leesburg, and Waterville.

The Lane County Sheriffs' Office is the lead agency for all evacuation-related information.

Resources for Evacuees:

The updated evacuation point is Thurston High School for those in Blue River and west of Blue River. People east of Blue River are encouraged to travel east to the Deschutes County Fairgrounds in Redmond (3800 SE Airport Way).

William has opened the Bob Keeper Center (250 S. 8-M St., Springfield, OR 97478) and William Adult Activity Center (215 W. C St., Springfield, OR 97477) as temporary rescue shelters for community members who have been evacuated or lost power.

Quick Facts

Incident Summary

Approximate Acreage

37,000

Fire
Containment:

0%

Start Date and Cause:

September 7, unknown

Incident Commander:

Ian Yocum, Oregon State Fire Marshal’s Red Team

For Additional Information

Facebook:  facebook.com/Holiday-Farm-Fire-118457783322010

E-mail: Holiday@gmail.com

Lane County Sheriff’s Office: https://www.facebook.com/LaneCountySheriffsOffice

Lane County Emergency Services: lanecounty.org/cms/one.aspx?paged=17035134



Santiam Fire Update for Wednesday September 9, 2020 

 

Keizer, Ore. – Wildland firefighters, working on the Beachie Creek Fire, were forced to evacuate their encampment in Gates, Ore. after several electrical lines and transformers were destroyed in an extreme wind event which began on Monday afternoon. Pacific Team Northwest 13 is currently headquartered at Chemeketa Community College in Salem. 

 

Originally listed at 469 acres, the fire has grown overnight to over 131,000 acres driven by high winds and extremely dry fuels. Originally named the Beachie Creek fire, it has been renamed the Santiam Fire acknowledging that the Beachie Creek Fire no longer was the main cause of rapid fire growth and was instead fed by a series of small fires largely caused by downed power lines and other ignition sources throughout the area. 

 

WEATHER: A Red Flag Warning for strong winds will be in effect today through 8:00 p.m. Wednesday. Wind gusts are likely to reach between 30-40 mph with 50-60 mph gusts likely on exposed ridges. The wind may ease Tuesday night and into Wednesday. Fire conditions are expected to improve later in the week. 

 

SAFETY: Members of the public are encourage to heed local evacuation orders issued by the county sheriff’s office and emergency notification systems. Any public trying to access the area are asked to stay away to keep roads clear for those evacuating and for emergency vehicles. The roads are extremely hazardous due to falling debris, smoke and heavy traffic. Members of the public in the immediate area are asked to keep the Ready, Set, Go levels of evacuation in mind. READY your belongings; SET your things at the door or prepack them in your car; GO Leave immediately. 

 

SMOKE: Smoke is expected to remain heavy throughout the area for the next several days. Individuals with respiratory issues may find themselves affected by the intense smoke. Smoke levels are fluctuating between unhealthy for sensitive groups (orange) and hazardous (maroon) in these areas. Areas closest to fires - near Detroit, Florence, Chiloquin and Eugene 

- are having the worst smoke impacts. Smoke levels can change rapidly depending on weather. Check current conditions on DEQ's Air Quality Index or by downloading the free OregonAIR app on your smartphone. 

 

CLOSURES: Willamette National Forest roads, trails, and lands around the fire area are closed. View the official order (Order 06-18-04-20-13) or go to InciWeb (link below) for a list and map of the closed roads, trails, and recreation sites. 

 

Public information: 

Facebook: facebook.com/santiamfire2020 

E-mail: Santiamfire2020@gmail.com Phone: 541-583-0526, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. 

Inciweb 

https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/7001/ 

 

Oregon Smoke Blog http://oregonsmoke.blogspot.com/p/air-quality-now.html 



Lionshead Fire Update - Wednesday, September 9, 2020

Lionshead Wildfire
The Pacific Northwest experienced historic fire activity over the last two days.  Continued easterly winds have pushed the Lionshead Fire to grow to 105,340 acres.

Weather and Fire Behavior: Temperatures will be warmer with slightly lower humidity levels than yesterday. Easterly winds will persist through most of the day, changing to southeast in the late afternoon. East winds will decrease; however, drought conditions, high temperatures and low relative humidity will contribute to continued active fire behavior.

Current Situation: Extreme drought conditions combined with strong easterly winds, due to a cold front, pushed the fire spread west over the crest of the cascades and north of Mt. Jefferson. Long range spotting contributed to more than 12 miles of fire spread that included the areas around Breitenbush and Detroit Lake. The fire also crossed highway 22 in multiple places. Fire personnel coordinated with local emergency services on evacuations, providing escort for residents and campers. Crews on the Warms Springs Reservation portion of the fire took advantage of the easterly winds to prepare and strengthen indirect containment lines. On the eastern and southern flanks of the fire, crews worked to clear roads in anticipation of a return to westerly prevailing winds to prevent the fire from moving toward Warm Springs and the Metolius Basin.

Today’s Activities: Safety of firefighters and the public remains our highest priority.  Firefighters will continue to assist with any necessary evacuations as needed. Crews will assess and provide protection to structures at risk in the Detroit area. On the west side of the crest of the cascades, fire crews will scout from the north and south to determine locations for containment lines. To the south fire crews will be looking for access in the area around Idanha and Detroit area. On the Warm Springs Reservation firefighters will continue preparing roads to be used as containment lines on the northeast and southern side of the Lionshead Fire. Air resources will be available as needed to help with containment efforts.

Evacuations:  Orders are being issued for evacuations as conditions change. Please monitor the local area sheriff’s department websites and Facebook for updates. (Deschutes, Jefferson, Wasco, Linn, and Marion counties)

Closures: For public and firefighter safety, roads and trails on the southwest portion of the Warm Springs Reservation near the fires are closed to the public. Forest closures are in place for Deschutes, Mt. Hood and Willamette National Forests.  For more information about forest closures, please refer to National Forest websites.

 Deschutes NF Alerts     Willamette NF Alerts     Mt. Hood NF Alerts

A Temporary Flight Restriction is in place over the P-515 and Lionshead Fires. Wildfires are a No Drone Zone. 

FOR ADDITIONAL FIRE INFORMATION:

TripCheck: https://www.tripcheck.com/.

Inciweb:  https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/7049/

Facebook: www.facebook.com/LionsheadFire 



Oregon reports 125 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 8 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed eight more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 494, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 125 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 28,471.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (7), Columbia (1), Curry (1), Deschutes (1), Jackson (7), Jefferson (1), Josephine (3), Klamath (1), Lane (11), Linn (11), Malheur (11), Marion (23), Morrow (2), Multnomah (22), Polk (2), Tillamook (2), Umatilla (5), Union (1), Washington (10), and Yamhill (1).

Oregon’s 487th COVID-19 death is a 96-year-old woman in Deschutes County who tested positive on July 14 and died on Aug.10 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 488th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on August 25 and died on Sept. 3 at Kaiser Westside Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 489th COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Aug. 3 and died on Sept. 5 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 490th COVID-19 death is a 49-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on July 17 and died on Sept. 4 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 491st COVID-19 death is a 64-year-old man in Malheur County who tested positive on Aug. 24 and died on Sept. 6 at St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 492nd COVID-19 death is a 97-year-old woman in Umatilla County who tested positive on July 16 and died on Sept. 8 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 493rd COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old man in Morrow County who tested positive on Aug. 7 and died on Sept. 4 at Good Shepherd Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 494th COVID-19 death is a 68-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Aug. 23 and died on Aug. 30 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.


Wildfire Smoke and COVID-19

With air quality very poor across the state due to wildfires, OHA reminds Oregonians that exposure to smoke and other forms of pollution can increase the risk and severity of respiratory infections, including possibly COVID-19.

When smoke is heavy, the key protection strategy is to lessen exposure to the smoke, particularly for people who have a condition that makes them more sensitive. People can do this by staying inside at home, getting and using an air filter, and spending time in a cleaner air space. For those who are asked to evacuate or those who choose to leave home to go to an area with cleaner air, remember to take and use a face covering along with hand sanitizer and to practice physical distancing from non-household members.

If it’s safe to do so, staying home to lessen exposure to wildfire smoke also lessens the risk for contracting COVID-19. Further information on how to protect against wildfire smoke can be found at healthoregon.org/wildfires.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



CROOK COUNTY, OR -- A head-on collision Sunday morning sent two people to the hospital. Sergeant Mitch Madden with the Crook County Sheriff says the wreck involved a Honda Accord and an Ford F-150 pickup at Northwest Grimes Road and Northwest Lamonta Road. He says the driver of the Honda, a 16-year-old girl from Prineville, drove through a stop sign. Madden says the driver was cited for running the stop sign and careless driving. She and another female passenger were taken to the hospital. The pickup driver, 44-year-old Bill Rodriguez of Prineville was not injured.



BEND, OR -- COCC students can now apply to receive financial help with expenses related to COVID-19. Director of Public Relations Jenn Kovitz says eligible students can receive a maximum of one thousand dollars per term. Kovitz says to qualify, students must be a US citizen or an eligible noncitizen enrolled in a minimum of three credits. The money will be disbursed on a first-come, first-served basis. For more info on how to apply, go to the COCC website.

 



BEND, OR -- Bend home and business owners who have underground irrigation systems need to get the backflow system tested before end-of-season sprinkler system blowouts. D-J Buhman is Safe Drinking Water Coordinator for the City of Bend. He says the tests are the single most critical thing you can do to make sure the water in the home or business is safe and clean.  Buhman says the tests cost between 40-and-80-dollars. He says backflow assemblies that fail must be repaired as soon as possible and retested until they pass.



SISTERS, OR  -- Yesterday ODOT locked the gates at both ends of Highway 242 that runs from Sisters to Springfield due to the Holiday Farm Fire. Peter Murphy at ODOT says they closed Highway 242 to prevent people from using it to get around blockades at Santiam Junction. Murphy says they told people on Highway 242 to drive east to Sisters. He says they also put leaflets on parked cars urging the drivers to leave the area as soon as possible and head east. Murphy says if you have to travel, go to the  tripcheck-dot-com website for the safest, most open route to your destination.



PRINEVILLE, OR -- Crook county schools opened yesterday and having met state metrics, they were able to have K-to-3 students in the classroom, although there was a bit of a different feel to it. Spokesman Jason Carr says in the past, doors would have opened early for kids to get their breakfast meal. He says they had to send students in one at a time after they went through temperature checks. Carr says each student brings their own mask to school but once inside the classroom teachers and students have face shields. 



OCHOCO fOREST -- A Silver Lake man, camping with friends, was killed Monday night when a tree, blown over by high winds, came crashing down onto his trailer, crushing it. 76-year-old Jack Pierson was out with long-time friends off Forest Road 22 near Scotts Camp in the Ochoco’s.  The windstorm sheared off the tree near the stump around 10 o’clock. Pierson’s friends went through the debris and located him, already deceased. Due to no cell service in the area the friends had to drive for an hour to get coverage and call for help. Crook County responders determined Pierson died instantly in a tragic accident.

 



STATE FIRE MARSHAL MOBILIZES OREGON FIRE SERVICE RESOURCES TO THE HOLIDAY FARM FIRE AND THE BEACHIE CREEK AND LIONSHEAD FIRES (PHOTO)

 

News Release from Oregon State Fire Marshal
Downloadable file: thumb_OSFM_Comms_Team.jpg

Gov. Kate Brown has declared the Beachie Creek and Lionshead Fires in Marion County and the Holiday Farm Fire in Lane County as Conflagrations.

The Beachie Creek and Lionshead Fires were active overnight in the Santiam canyon. The Holiday Farm Fire is active near McKenzie Bridge.

The invocation of the Conflagration Act by Gov. Brown cleared the way for the State Fire Marshal to mobilize firefighters and equipment to assist local resources battling the fires.

The Office of State Marshal’s Green Incident Management Team has been mobilized to the Beachie Creek Fire and Lionshead fires and the OSFM’s Red Incident Management Team has been mobilized to the Holiday Farm Fire.

As of 8 a.m. this morning, four task forces from Marion, Benton, Linn, and Clatsop counties are deployed with the Green Team to support the Santiam Canyon communities being impacted by the Beachie Creek and Lionshead fires.

Two task forces from Polk and Yamhill counties are deployed with the Red Team.

Currently, evacuations have been ordered near both fires by local law enforcement.

In addition to its deployment of two IMTs, the OSFM has sent resources to Klamath County to support local firefighting resources who are responding to a fire near Collier State Park.

The predicted wind event has impacted much of the state. Multiple requests for structural firefighting resources have been made through the Oregon Fire Mutual Aid System.

All Oregonians should monitor communications coming from their local emergency response systems and communications from local law enforcement agencies, who are responsible for ordering evacuations.

The OSFM is asking residents to keep their fellow Oregonians and firefighters in their thoughts.

Additional updates for the incident may be accessed at:

• Oregon State Fire Marshal Facebook: www.facebook.com/OregonStateFireMarshal/

• Oregon Department of Forestry Facebook: www.facebook.com/oregondepartmentofforestry/

• ODF statewide wildfire blog: https://odfwildfire.wpengine.com/

• Wildfire Evacuation Readiness: www.oregon.gov/osp/programs/sfm/Pages/Wildland-Urban-Interface.aspx#evacuation



News Release from Oregon Office of Emergency Management
 

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management is assisting through the State Emergency Coordination Center multiple counties encountering limited firefighting resources, challenging transportation access, as well as power outages and cellular service interruption. 

Local evacuation information may be unclear due to power outages and a quickly changing situation. Stay tuned to trusted social media sources – county emergency management offices, Red Cross Cascades, state agencies such as the State Fire Marshal, Oregon Department Forestry, Oregon Department of Agriculture, etc. If Internet resources are not possible, contact your county sheriff’s department. If possible, check in on family, friends and neighbors to ensure their safety.  

Know evaluation level actions and heed them!

  • Level 1 – BE READY – Monitor emergency services websites and local media outlets for information. This is the time for preparation and precautionary movement of persons with special needs and, in some cases, pets and livestock.
     
  • Level 2 – BE SET – Be ready to leave at a moment’s notice. There is significant danger to your area. Be prepared to voluntarily relocate to a Temporary Evacuation Point (TEPO as set up by the Red Cross, or move to family/friends outside of the affected area.
  • Level 3 – GO – Leave immediately! Danger to your area is current or imminent. Do not delay leaving to gather any belongings or make efforts to protect your home.

Several roads are closed in affected fire areas and due to wind storm damage. Check TripCheck for the latest information.  Additional statewide wildfire information can be found on the State of Oregon Wildfire Dashboard

“Life safety is our number one priority,” said OEM Director Andrew Phelps. “Several jurisdictions have already declared a state of emergency. We are working closely with counties and tribes to assist in any and all ways that we can.”

Public Safety Power Shutoffs
PGE implemented a public safety power shutoff (PSPS) due to hot, dry, and windy conditions for about 5,000 customers located in high fire-risk areas near Mt. Hood.  This is a proactive safety outage to help protect people, property and the environment in the face of extreme fire danger conditions and high winds forecast in the area. This is expected to last 24-48 hours.

For additional information about public safety power shutoffs, including a map of the affected area, go to PortlandGeneral.com/wildfire or call 503-228-6322 or 800-542-8818. Real-time information about unplanned outages can be found at PortlandGeneral.com/Outage. 

Smoke
Smoke levels are currently fluctuating between unhealthy for sensitive groups and hazardous in areas closest to fires. Detroit, Florence, Eugene and Chiloquin – are having severe smoke impacts, as are other areas. 

Smoke can irritate the eyes and lungs and worsen some medical conditions. Young children, adults over 65, pregnant women and people with heart disease, asthma or other respiratory conditions are most at risk. 

  • Stay inside if possible. Keep windows and doors closed.
  • Be aware of smoke in your area and avoid places with the highest levels.
  • If smoke levels are hazardous, consider leaving the area.
  • Use high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. These can be portable filters or can be installed in indoor heating, ventilation, cooling and air purification systems.
  • If you have heart or lung disease or asthma, follow your healthcare provider’s advice.

Additional information on wildfire smoke can be found on the Oregon Smoke Blog.

State Park Closures
State parks that are closed until further notice include Silver Falls, Detroit Lake, North Santiam and Collier (north of Klamath Falls). No entry for any purpose is permitted.

COVID-19
Amid wildfire, smoke and erratic weather, the COVID-19 pandemic is still rampant. Face coverings are required in all parts of the state and Oregonians are reminded to maintain social distancing, and wash hands frequently.

This update contains information from other state agency reports.



Governor Kate Brown Invokes the Emergency Conflagration Act in Response to Beachie Creek, Lionshead, and Holiday Farm Fire  

 
 

(Salem, OR) — Governor Kate Brown approved an emergency conflagration declaration for the Beachie Creek, Lionshead, and Holiday Farm Fire. The Beachie Creek and Lionshead Fires were active overnight in the Santiam Canyon. Holiday Farm Fire is active near McKenzie Bridge.  

"Almost every year since becoming Governor, I've witnessed historic wildfire seasons," said Governor Kate Brown. "This past weekend, we experienced significant wind that is fueling wildfires with devastating consequences across Oregon, on top of a dire pandemic. For people and families in the evacuation areas, please listen to local calls to evacuate as needed — these lifesaving measures can protect the lives of you and your loved ones, as well as our firefighters. In addition, I am asking all Oregonians to remain vigilant with any activity that could spark a wildfire during this historic wind event. We all need to do our part to help the many firefighters battling multiple fires across Oregon."

In accordance with ORS 476.510 - 476.610, Governor Brown determined that a threat to a life, safety, and property exists due to fire, and the threat exceeds the firefighting capabilities of local firefighting personnel and equipment. The Governor's declaration authorizes the Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal to mobilize resources to assist local resources battling the fire.
 

 

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                                       Crater Lake National Park Implements Fire Restrictions  

 

CRATER LAKE, OREGON – With the increased fire danger in Southern Oregon, Crater Lake National Park will go into a complete fire ban. To ensure public safety and to provide the highest degree of protection to park resources, the following restrictions were implemented effective at 9:00 AM on Tuesday, September 8, 2020:  

 

Campfires 

  • NO wood fires or charcoal fires are not allowed anywhere in the park.  
  • Gasoline and propane camp stoves and gas grills are permitted in campgrounds, picnic areas, backcountry areas, and residential areas.  

 

Smoking  

  • Smoking is permitted only in the following areas:
    • In vehicles, provided that an ashtray is used for ashes and butts.  
    • While stopped in an area at least three feet in diameter that is barren or free of all flammable materials. Ashes and butts must be disposed of safely and may not be discarded on the ground.  

 

Fireworks  

  • Fireworks are prohibited in the park at all times.

 

These restrictions are implemented pursuant to the authority described in 36 Code of Federal Regulations 2.13(c), 2.21(a) and 2.38 (b). Our goal is voluntary compliance; however, persons who fail to comply with these restrictions may be cited or arrested. Thank you for your cooperation.  

 

-NPS- 

 



Weather and Fire Behavior:  The Red Flag Warning continues throughout today for gusty winds and low relative humidity. East winds are expected to be strongest early in the day, then gradually subside. Temperatures will be cooler today, reaching the 70s in the lowlands and the 60s at higher elevations. The winds are expected to continue to push the fire west further onto the Willamette National Forest. The fire may also be pushed to the southwest, past the south flank of Mt. Jefferson.

Last 24 hours: The Lionshead Fire was actively burning early Monday.  Sunday’s spot fires on the northwest flank burned into the main fire. As a strong cold front approached and passed through the vicinity, winds became gusty and shifted to coming from the east. The winds, smoke, and blowing dust grounded aircraft mid-day. The winds aligned with terrain and pushed the northwest edge of the fire through a band of heavier fuels north of Mt. Jefferson, south of Shitike Creek. The fire ran 4 miles in less than 2 hours, crossing onto the Willamette National Forest in the Mt. Jefferson Wilderness. The fire continued to burn actively through the night, spreading west to near Idanha and the community of Breitenbush.

More work was completed on the J-100, J-173, P-400, and P-500 roads, preparing them as potential control lines. Work was nearly finished on the roads between the south end of the fire and the Warm Springs Reservation boundary.

Today’s Activities: Due to the strong east winds and continued low humidity, the fire is expected to spread further to the west. Firefighters will be shifted as needed to areas where they can safely and effectively work to slow the fire’s spread. Some fire personnel will continue to prepare indirect control lines to the south and north of the fire. Aircraft operations may be restricted by the wind and poor visibility.

Evacuations: Orders are being issued for evacuations as conditions change. Please monitor the local area sheriff’s department websites and Facebook pages for updates. (Deschutes, Jefferson, Wasco, Linn, and Marion counties)

Closures: For public and firefighter safety, roads and trails on the southwest portion of the Warm Springs Reservation, Willamette and Deschutes National Forests near the fires are closed to the public. Forty miles of the Pacific Crest Trail are closed between Santiam Pass and Olallie Lake. Much of the Mt. Jefferson Wilderness and some nearby lands and recreation sites are closed. See Willamette, Deschutes, and Mt. Hood N.F. websites for trail, road and area closures.  Deschutes NF Alerts     Willamette NF Alerts     Mt. Hood NF Alerts

 

A Temporary Flight Restriction is in place over the P-515 and Lionshead Fires. Wildfires are a No Drone Zone.

 



Oregon reports 169 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 4 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed four more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 486, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 169 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 28,355.

The new cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (17), Crook (1), Deschutes (1), Jackson (17), Jefferson (2), Lane (7), Malheur (4), Marion (25), Morrow (4), Multnomah (39), Polk (4), Umatilla (10), Wasco (1), Washington (25), and Yamhill (11).

Oregon’s 482nd COVID-19 death is a 78-year-old woman in Lane County who tested positive on Aug. 27 and died on Sept. 5, in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 483rd COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Aug. 29 and died on Sept. 3, in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 484th COVID-19 death is a 100-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on July 28 and died on Sept. 7, in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 485th COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Aug. 26 and died Sept. 6, in her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 486th COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Aug. 28 and died on Sept. 6, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



Oregon Department of Transportation Closes Highway 242 Due to Holiday Farm Fire

 

Sisters – Officials with the Oregon Department of Transportation in conjunction with the Deschutes and Willamette National Forests have closed Highway 242, which runs between Sisters and Highway 126, due to the nearby Holiday Farm Fire. Visitors currently in the area will need to proceed east on Highway 242 to Sisters.

Due to the evolving wildfire situation across the Central Cascades, visitors should check www.tripcheck.com for the safest, open route to their destinations. For local wildfire information please visit centraloregonfire.org or @CentralORFire on Twitter. For information on specific wildfire incidents visit https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/ and monitor local news sources.

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IF YOU'RE ON EVACUATION ALERT THESE QUICK TASKS WILL SAVE YOU THOUSANDS IN A WILDFIRE

 

News Release from Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services
Posted on FlashAlert: September 8th, 2020 10:45 AM

Here are resources for people who are on evacuation alert.  

Two tasks to do today to save time, money, and stress during a wildfire:

  1. Create a home inventory – Take photos or video of each room in your home. Pay close attention to what’s on walls, in closets and drawers, and storage spaces.
  2. Check your insurance coverage – Make sure you have the right coverage for fire damage. For example, you need comprehensive coverage on your auto policy to cover damage caused by fire.

These two tasks will help people save thousands following a disaster, and they are good for everyone to do, no matter where you live. 

Visit the Division of Financial Regualtion website for more resources: dfr.oregon.gov/preparenow

 



Matsutake Mushroom season gets underway today on the Deschutes, Fremont-Winema and Willamette National Forests. Jean Nelson-Dean at the Deschutes National Forest says they’ve made a change to the mushroom permitting process due to COVID-19. She says you can go to any of the three national forest or to ranger district webpages for the letter, with one exception. She says the Sisters Ranger District does not allow mushroom harvesting. Matsutake mushroom season ends November 8th

 



BEND, OR -- Late Saturday afternoon Bend Fire & Rescue responded to Robberson Ford on Northeast 3rd Street, on a report of a dumpster fire. Crews arrived and found the fire was not in a dumpster, but was burning pallets, a utility pole, three vehicles, and landscaping. The fire was quickly knocked down, but due to the electrical hazard from arcing power lines, complete extinguishment was delayed about a half hour when Pacific Power shut off the power. Losses estimated at 60-thousand dollars primarily due to vehicle damage. The cause of fire was an electrical failure of unknown type at the utility pole. The utility says power should be restored today.

 



As part of its recovery and resilience efforts, United Way is awarding $100,000 to help families with childcare through Better Together’s Child Initiative. Executive Director Ken Wilhelm says the money will give people access to full-day care for kids ages 5-to-10. He said they’ve identified thousands of those “high-need” families who simply don’t have the financial ability to purchase childcare services if they could find a slot. You can learn more at united-way-central-oregon-dot-org.



BEND, OR -- On Sunday Bend Police were dispatched to the Days Inn Motel located on NE 3rd Street on a reported stabbing. Upon arrival, officers contacted the victim who had been stabbed in the chest and sustained a life-threatening injury. Bend Fire Medics  transported the victim to St. Charles Bend. During the investigation police learned the victim was involved in a physical altercation with another man, Jonathan Roberson, just prior to police being dispatched. Roberson had left the scene in a black 2006 Toyota Camry and police are actively attempting to locate Roberson.

 



BEND, OR -- Bend Fire crews are mopping up a fire at Ron's Auto Body on S.E. Armour Road in Bend this morning.  The fire was first reported about 10 o'clock last night. Arriving firefighters found flames coming through the roof of the main building. The roof began to collapse soon after arrival and crews were evacuated from the building for their safety. Crews are still on scene working to extinguish all the remaining hot spots, hampered by the collapsed roof. S.E. Armour is closed until further notice. The cause is under investigation.

 



Oregon reports 154 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 482, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 154 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 28,190. The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (9), Benton (2), Clackamas (16), Columbia (1), Deschutes (1), Douglas (2), Jackson (9), Jefferson (3), Lane (7), Lincoln (1), Linn (3), Malheur (7), Marion (19), Multnomah (29), Polk (5), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (5), Washington (26), Yamhill (8).

Oregon’s 482nd COVID-19 death is a 78-year-old woman in Lane County who tested positive on Aug. 27 and died on Sept. 5 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Note: Tomorrow, Tuesday, Sept. 8, OHA will tally the Labor Day weekend totals.

See table below for total cases, deaths, and negative tests by county.

County

Cases1

Total deaths2

Negative tests3

Baker

86

2

1,412

Benton

227

6

11,133

Clackamas

2,079

58

53,647

Clatsop

97

0

4,997

Columbia

136

1

6,192

Coos

126

0

5,750

Crook

57

1

2,344

Curry

23

0

1,441

Deschutes

704

11

25,559

Douglas

182

3

11,107

Gilliam

4

0

253

Grant

8

0

794

Harney

12

0

728

Hood River

238

0

4,566

Jackson

904

3

25,747

Jefferson

474

7

4,323

Josephine

171

2

9,659

Klamath

236

2

9,277

Lake

30

0

765

Lane

795

8

55,628

Lincoln

470

13

8,039

Linn

405

13

14,427

Malheur

1,295

20

4,467

Marion

4,061

82

42,284

Morrow

455

3

1,563

Multnomah

6,302

124

125,646

Polk

453

15

7,737

Sherman

18

0

318

Tillamook

43

0

2,728

Umatilla

2,785

39

12,020

Union

423

2

3,035

Wallowa

23

1

869

Wasco

222

3

4,468

Washington

3,974

49

81,709

Wheeler

0

0

156

Yamhill

672

14

15,188

Total

28,190

482

559,976

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases.

3This includes cases who test negative and are not epi-linked to a confirmed case.



BEND, OR -- MidOregon Credit Union is holding virtual workshops this month. The Women and Investing workshop will be held on September 8th at 4pm and the Social Secuirty and Your Retirement workshop will be on September 16th at 5:30pm. Vice President Kyle Frick says the workshops are about a half an hour long and attendance has increased by 50-100%. He says for more information and to sign up, check out their webpage at mid-oregon-dot-com.



BEND, OR -- During a briefing with Deschutes County Commissioners this week, Health Director Doctor George Conway said the masks people wear to prevent the spread of COVID-19 aren’t much good when the air is filled with smoke from wildfires. Conway says an N-95 mask that is properly fitted can keep small pollutants from wildfires out of the lungs. He says the very small size of particulates from wildfire smoke can be especially harmful to people with respiratory and other health issues.



Deschutes County Sheriff’s deputies are trying to locate the driver of a truck who led a deputy on a chase Monday afternoon. Detective Sergeant Jason James says the driver almost hit a deputy’s vehicle on Northwest Way and sped off. The deputy pursued the truck into the Tetherow Crossing neighborhood. Police used a K9 but the driver was not found. However the truck passenger, 35 year old Ryan Matthew Rowe of Redmond was found and cited for Attempting to Elude and Criminal Trespassing. Police are still looking for the driver of the truck. 

 



BEND, OR -- A Bend man has plead guilty to one count of distribution of child pornography. 24- year old Pierce Matthew Morrow was charged with possessing, distributing, and receipt of pornography involving children in January 2018. Investigators found Morrow participated in an online chat room that involved posted images of girls and boys engaged in sexual conduct. Morrow admitted to posting child pornography online, a charge punishable by up to twenty years in prison, with a 5-year mandatory minimum sentence. He will be sentenced December 3rd . Photo credit Central Oregon Daily.



BEND, OR -- A Bend woman was cited last night following a wreck on Highway 20 near Northeast Azure Avenue. Police say 24 year old Anne Marie Perrault was driving east on Highway 20 when she lost control of her Mercedes, went over the median and ended up facing west in the westbound lanes of Highway 20. Perrault’s car was rear ended by a 1993 Volkswagen. Both cars were totaled and two men in the V-W were taken to the hospital. Police say Perrault was visibly intoxicated and she was arrested and cited for DUII, Assault and Reckless Driving.



BEND, OR -- Bend Mayor Sally Russell says the city has extended its administrative order discouraging people traveling to Bend through. October 26th. She says the order is intended to help limit the spread of COVID-19 in Bend and to protect the medical system. The Mayor says preventing the spread of the virus is critical to reopening schools and getting kids in the classroom..



Oregon reports 274 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 470, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 274 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 27,336.

The new cases are in the following counties: Baker (2), Clackamas (24), Columbia (2), Coos (4), Deschutes (4), Douglas (1), Jackson (18), Jefferson (6), Josephine (1), Lane (13), Lincoln (1), Linn (2), Malheur (23), Marion (36), Morrow (7), Multnomah (65), Umatilla (15), Wasco (4), Washington (40), and Yamhill (6).

Oregon’s 468th COVID-19 death is a 79-year-old man in Malheur County who tested positive on July 14 and died on Aug. 23, at Vibra Hospital of Boise, Idaho. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 469th COVID-19 death is a 56-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Aug. 1 and died on Aug. 22, at Providence St. Vincent. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 470th COVID-19 death is a 96-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on July 8 and died on Aug. 21 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

NOTE: OHA has more information about Oregon’s 416th COVID-19 death first reported on Aug. 22. She was a 37-year old woman who tested positive on Aug. 10 and died on August 15, at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had no known underlying conditions. Due to a data compilation error, she was also reported as Oregon’s 449th COVID-19 on Aug. 29. OHA regrets the error.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



Oregon’s Senior Senator Ron Wyden is not happy with President Donald Trump’s rhetoric about protests over social justice issues. Wyden says he wishes the President would work to unite Americans instead of polarizing issues and dividing the country. Wyden also says he hopes, when the US Senate comes back to Washington next week, they can address the need to help millions of Americans still out of work.



The Oregon State Marine Board is accepting public comments on rules affecting boaters on North and South Twin Lakes. Program Coordinator Dorothy Diehl (deal) says the rule change came at the request of a Deschutes county resident. She says the person asked that people with disabilities be able to use a boat with an electric motor at not to exceed slow, no-wake speed. Diehl says public comments on the proposed rule change are being taken by the Marine Board until October 4th .



BEND, OR -- Deschutes County Commissioners got a briefing yesterday about the availability of P-P-E, Personal Protection Equipment. Emergency Manager Nathan Garibay says two PPE’s, medical grade N-95’s and Nitro Gloves remain in high demand. He says he has learned that when given a delivery date, add a month and double it because that’s how long it takes. Garibay says Nitro Gloves like N-95’s are back ordered. He says the demand for gloves come as more industries have started using them.

 



BEND, OR -- Bend Police recovered two stolen vehicles from the Portland area and two suspects are in custody. Yesterday, police were at the Pines West Mobile Home Park and found a stolen motorcycle from Clackamas parked near a home.  34 year old Jordan Kenneth Ashley of Bend was inside and refused to come out. A CERT Team went to the scene and convinced Ashley to give up. A 27 year old woman, Sarah Elizabeth Vernon of Bend was also taken into custody. Police later discovered a stolen car from Beaverton near the home. Ashley and Vernon are jailed on vehicle theft charges. 



Oregon reports 140 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 468, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 140 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 27,075.

The new cases are in the following counties: Baker (1), Clackamas (4), Coos (2), Curry (1), Deschutes (1), Douglas (1), Jackson (14), Josephine (3), Lane (11), Lincoln (1), Linn (1), Malheur (8), Marion (19), Morrow (1), Multnomah (32), Polk (7), Sherman (1), Umatilla (13), Wallowa (1), Wasco (1), Washington (16) and Yamhill (1).

Oregon’s 466th COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old woman in Polk County who tested positive on Aug. 27 and died on Aug. 29. Location of death is being confirmed. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 467th COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Aug. 14 and died on Aug. 29 at Rogue Valley Medical Center in Medford. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 468th COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on July 29 and died on Aug. 31 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Morrow County COVID 19 workplace outbreak

 An outbreak of 21 cases of COVID-19 has been reported at Port of Morrow Cold Storage in Morrow County. The case count includes all persons linked to the outbreak, which may include household members and other close contacts to an employee. 

The outbreak investigation started on Aug. 1, but the initial case count was below the threshold for public disclosure. State and county public health officials are working with the company to address the outbreak and protect the health of workers.

COVID-19 daily cases continue to decline

During the week of Monday, Aug. 24, through Sunday, Aug. 30, OHA recorded 1,558 new cases of COVID-19 infection. This is down 8.6% from last week’s tally of 1,704 and Oregon’s lowest weekly total since the end of June.

The percentage of positive tests also dropped to 4.4 percent, the lowest in two months. Thirty-nine Oregonians were reported to have died, up from 32 last week. The 26,713 cases reported in Oregon as of Aug. 30 equates to about to 631 cases per 100,000 persons. Also, as of Aug. 30, 459 Oregonians have died with COVID-19, a mortality rate of 11 deaths per 100,000 Oregonians.

The age group with the highest incidence of reported infection continues to be 20–29-year-olds, with rates decreasing in subsequent decades of life. Through April 18, 51 percent of reported cases had been among persons 50 or older and 48 percent of the deaths have involved persons 80 or older.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

 Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



BEND, OR -- Families are invited to join Bend-La Pine School educators to learn more about Comprehensive Distance Learning for elementary, middle and high school students. Deputy Superintendent Katie Legace says the live events will be broadcast on the district’s Facebook and Vimeo accounts. Elementary is today in Spanish and tomorrow in English, both at 6pm. Middle and high schools will be today in Spanish and tomorrow in English at 7:30pm as well. Legace says the event will also be recorded to be viewed later on the Bend La Pine Schools website.



Fire danger remains extreme across Central Oregon. Jean Nelson-Dean at Deschutes National Forests says they are dividing personnel into smaller groups and assigning handwashing stations to slow the spread of the virus. Fire Incident Management Teams are assigned and moved to locations dependent on components such as containment. Firefighters have a work schedule of a maximum of 14 days followed by 2 days of rest. So the changeover provides time for them to regroup between fires.



BEND, OR -- Bend fire crews responded to a structure fire on Tumalo Road around 2:45pm yesterday. Arrival crews found a fully involved detached two car garage with fire spreading to adjacent trees and brush and threatening an RV, vehicles, and a residence. Crews made an aggressive attack on the fire which kept it from spreading to the nearby threatened exposures. The fire was controlled just before 4-o’clock. Cause of the fire is still under investigation.



PRINEVILLE, OR -- Crook county schools will have K-through-3-students back in the classrooms on September 8th. Spokesman Jason Carr says they hope to learn early next week if they can have 4th through 12th graders back soon. He says ironically once students are back in class the thresholds become less strict. Carr says this year students will be separated into groups known as cohorts. The cohorts will go to class, recess and lunch together all year long. Carr says working parents in the district are happy their kids will be back in class this year.

 



Oregon reports 243 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 6 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed six more lives in Oregon raising the state’s death toll to 465, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 243 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 26,946.

The new cases are in the following counties: Baker (4), Benton (4), Clackamas (26), Clatsop (1), Deschutes (1), Douglas (1), Hood River (2), Jackson (10), Jefferson (4), Josephine (4), Lane (9), Lincoln (2), Malheur (10), Marion (39), Morrow (2), Multnomah (50), Polk (4), Umatilla (15), Union (1), Washington (42), and Yamhill (12).

Oregon’s 460th COVID-19 death is a 41-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Aug. 7 and died on Aug. 23, at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 461st COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old woman in Linn County who tested positive on Aug. 24 and died on Aug. 28, at Samaritan Albany General Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 462nd COVID-19 death is a 66-year-old man in Umatilla County who tested positive on July 31 and died on Aug. 28, at Good Shepherd Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 463rd COVID-19 death is a 27-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on July 31 and died on Aug. 28, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 464th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Aug. 22 and died on Aug. 27. Location of death is being confirmed. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 465th COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Aug. 7 and died on Aug. 28, in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



BEND, OR -- Tomorrow marks the 75th anniversary of V-J Day which stands for Victory Over Japan Day and the end of World War 2. The chair of the Bend Heroes Foundation, Dick Tobiason, says the public is invited to a special event at 9-tomorrow morning at the Memorial in Brooks Park. Tobiason says there are 15, World War 2 survivors in Bend and they have been invited to tomorrow’s event. He says given the age and health conditions of the veterans, many may not be able to make it. Tobiason says they’ve invited family members to the celebration in case their relative can’t make it.

 



BEND, OR -- The Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities has accredited COCC for a term of seven years, the maximum period possible. Director of Communications Jennifer Kovitz says this process was uniquely challenging because of this year’s virtual visit. After commending COCC for strengths from their strategic use of technology to enhance communication to their high level of engagement during a pandemic, they’ve made four recommendations for improvement. Kovitz says they’re confident they will have addressed and presented the improvements long before the 7 year term is up.


 



The Frog Fire is now 90% contained and crews will work this week to achieve full containment. A Type 2 Incident Management Team was brought in to add capacity to firefighting efforts. It will be monitored continually until declared “controlled” or “dead out.” An area closure is in place for lands west of Forest Road 16. To view closures orders and maps, visit the forest service website.



CAMP SHERMAN, OR -- The Green Ridge Fire is 4,338 acres and 85% contained. The fire team expects to be at 100% containment by Wednesday. Greenridge Fire officials also reported a drone flying over the area Sunday night. Public Information Officer Tom Fields, says firefighting aircraft must land if drones are spotted near a wildfire for safety reasons. He says to operate a drone near a wildfire interferes with the effort to fight the fire and is illegal. This can lead to a serious fine and/or court appearance. Fields says a drone can compromise firefighter and public safety.  


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